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  #61  
Old Posted Oct 3, 2016, 2:41 PM
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CITY HALL AND NATHAN PHILLIPS SQUARE:

Nathan Phillips Square is Canada's largest square, at a size of 4.85 hectares. It is sitauted between the new and the old City Hall. It was named after Nathan Phillip, who was Toronto's mayor from 1955-1962. In 2006 a revitalization plan was presented, that was inspired by Greek agoras and theaters. It was finished in 2014. Queen St, Dundas St, Bay St and University Ave surround it.
In the middle of this square you find fountains, ponds, trees and a very large Toronto sign, popular for photographs. Futuristic skybridges, that partly surround the square, connect the square with nearby hotels. The Toronto sign was installed temporarily for the 2015 Pan American Games, and was intended to be moved to another location after the games, but it became so popular that it is now a permanent feature of Nathan Phillips Square. It is so large that you can go inside the letters, and they are beautifully illuminated at night. The sides of the white letters are coloured in different colours and have different Toronto neighbourhoods written in them.
The pond is a popular place to skate, and the square is center for both the Cavalcade of Light festiival (lighting of the christmas tree) and the New Years Eve party.
The City Hall of Toronto is situated in one historic building, and two modern ones. The new part consist of two futuristic curved highrise buildings, designed by the Finnish architect Viljo Revell and completed in 1965. The tallest one has 27 floors. They were built because there were not enough space i the old city hall. There is a podium with a futuristic white dome, the inside of it can be seen from the lobby. The city's largest accessible green roof is situated on top of the podium.
Opposite the modern City Hall stands the Old City Hall, also a Toronto landmark, but completely different in style. The Old City Hall was built in 1899 in a beautiful romanesque revival style, with its landmark clock tower. It was designed by Edward James Lennox. We were allowed to go inside, after a security scan, but not to take pictures of the beautiful romanesque atrium inside. For many years it was one of the tallest buildings in Toronto. The clock tower is actually somewhat taller then the new city hall, 104m to the top. Since 1984 it is a National Historic Site.
The Peace Garden is a memorial to the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Pope John Paul II lit the flame with an ember from the Peace Flame in Hiroshima, and poured water from a river that flows through Nagasaki into the pool.
Other sculptures, like Henry Moores The Archer can also be found.
The historic, 98m tall, Canada Life Bldg from 1931, can be seen from the square. Trump Tower, Hilton and Sheraton Centre are also near.
http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Toronto_Nathan.html

Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall 13 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall 14 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall 15 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall 16 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall 17 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall 21 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall 25 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall 26 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall 28 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall 30 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall 31 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall 32 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall 33 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall 40 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall 42 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall 43 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall 44 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall 45 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall 47 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall 51 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall 53 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall 57 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall 58 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall 59 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Toronto_Nathan.html
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  #62  
Old Posted Oct 3, 2016, 2:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nouvellecosse View Post
Downtown wasn't dangerous to begin with, but there are definitely lots of positive things such as large numbers of people being able to access jobs and amenities in a walkable setting without having to travel long distances, which reduces carbon emissions and traffic congestion compared to having people live farther out (in many cities population growth occurs at the edge). And it also makes downtown more lively and interesting, since it can support more businesses and attract more people which is something that can be enjoyed by both downtown residents, and people visiting downtown.

The ironic thing is that the styles aren't even those prevailing in Asia, and the Asian cities that do have similar styles started adopted them after Toronto and Vancouver did. The only similarity is that there is highrise residential.
Toronto is more Amercian looking then Asian looking but I was definately thinking while walking on some streets, that they reminded of some Asian city.
Some streets for example Charles St W looked, opposite our hotel. like Hong Kong, or may be Tokyo. A bit further away, towards Queens Park, it looked like London. Honestly the central part of Yonge St (north of Dundas), reminded me of London. The CBD part of course more of New York. The area around Dundas Square looks like Tokyo, and Chinatown of course like China. Anyway, a really great city you have, and yes it is nice that it is residential buildings and hotels that are popping up and not so many office buildigns.
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  #63  
Old Posted Oct 8, 2016, 9:50 AM
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  #64  
Old Posted Oct 8, 2016, 9:50 AM
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SUBWAY (sorry for the blurry quality)

Toronto subway 03 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Toronto subway 04 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Toronto_subway.html

ST LAWRENCE MARKET:

St Lawrence Market is the center of the St Lawrence neighbourhood in Old Toronto. The main entrance is at Front Street, but there is also a lower entrance at the Esplanade, since the markethall is situated on one of Toronto's few sloping hills. There are totally four buildings, the 3-storey South Market building was Toronto's City Hall (and market) until 1899, when it was replaced by the monument one, and later the new highrises. The first one was a primitive wooden structure from 1803. The North market has existed over a century but the current markethall is the 3rd markethall building after fires and destruction. Meat, fruit, vegetables, food, drinks and souvenirs can all be found here so the markethall is a popular place to visit for both locals and tourists. There are also restaurants and café with fresh bakeries inside. During our visit there was an exhibtion about "The Beatles in Toronto" and a live band playing.

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Toronto_Lawrence.html

St Lawrence's Market 01 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

St Lawrence's Market 02 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

St Lawrence's Market 03 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

St Lawrence's Market 04 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

St Lawrence's Market 05 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

St Lawrence's Market 06 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

St Lawrence's Market 07 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

St Lawrence's Market 08 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

St Lawrence's Market 09 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

St Lawrence's Market 10 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

St Lawrence's Market 11 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

St Lawrence's Market 12 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Toronto_Lawrence.html
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  #65  
Old Posted Oct 9, 2016, 10:48 PM
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YONGE STREET:

Yonge Street is the leading street of Toronto, going from the financial district and harbour in the south to the northernmost suburbs. The most central part, where we stayed, at Comfort Hotel Downtown, is a hip entertainment district with somewhat neglect townhouses, cheap restaurants, drug stores (cannabis etc!), fastfood chains, hotels, department stores and super luxurious residential skyscrapers (in the middle of that!). A bit further to the South you will find fancy brand stores, and to the North it is more residential in its character (actually Yonge St changes character lots of times), and passes the posh Yorkville neighbourhood. Even further south, it is an ultramodern shopping and business district with some of Toronto's tallest skyscrapers.Yonge St was the world's longest road according to Guiness Book of Records, but was a conflation; it's extension is not counted part of Yonge St, so it is actually 86km long and not 1896km, but still enough to pass through the whole Toronto including suburbs, in South-North direction.

The most central part is the Yonge-Dundas Square, at the intersection of these two streets. Dundas Square is an ultramodern square with neon lights, ads, crowded restaurants, department stores, entertainment - the closest you come to Times Square in New York, or Shibuya in Tokyo. Especially after dark, this place look impressive. Eaton Centre, Toronto's foremost shopping mall, also has an entrance at Yonge St, right at the square.

At Yonge St and Asquith Ave you find the Toronto Reference Library, built in 1977 and designed by Raymond Moriyama. It is the biggest public reference library in Canada, and might not look so special from the outside with its boxy facade, but once you get inside you will find a large light 5-storey atrium and a pond. One might think you have just entered a luxury hotel. There is also a special Arthur Conan Doyle Room, dedicated to the author of Sherlock Holmes, complete with books and a room that is furnished to look like the author's writing room. The room be a bit hard to find, situated behind glass on the upper floor. In the library, there are also music instruments that can be borrowed!

Not until the recent years there have been many skyscrapers built along Yonge Street. The most significant skyscrapers along Yonge St are Aura, a mixed-use, 78-storey, 272m tall skyscraper from 2014 with its own shopping galleria.
One Bloor, a 76-storey, 257m tall glass scraper with curved balconies, almost completed during our visit in 2016. It is situated right next to our hotel, at Yonge, Bloor and Charles streets. These two are the tallest residential towers in Toronto. In the southermost part of Yonge St, you will since 2015 find the L Tower, a curved 58-storey condo glass building designed by Daniel Liebeskind, right next to the Sony Centre for Performing Arts.


IMG_8007 by Nightsky, on Flickr

IMG_8052 by Nightsky, on Flickr

IMG_8066 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Toronto by Nightsky, on Flickr

Toronto by Nightsky, on Flickr

Toronto by Nightsky, on Flickr

Toronto by Nightsky, on Flickr

Toronto by Nightsky, on Flickr

Toronto by Nightsky, on Flickr
Toronto by Nightsky, on Flickr
Aura skyscraper

IMG_8803 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Hockey Hall of Fame

IMG_8047 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Dundas Square 21 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Dundas Square 20 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Toronto Bus Tour 118 by Nightsky, on Flickr

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Toronto_Yonge.html
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  #66  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2016, 5:49 PM
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YONGE ST BY NIGHT:

Toronto by night 29 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Toronto by night 30 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Toronto by night 31 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Toronto by night 33 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Toronto by night 35 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Toronto by night 36 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Toronto by night 37 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Toronto by night 38 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Toronto by night 39 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Toronto by night 40 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Toronto by night 41 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Toronto by night 43 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Toronto by night 44 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Toronto by night 45 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Toronto by night 46 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Toronto by night 47 by Nightsky, on Flickr

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Toronto_by_night.html

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Toronto_Yonge.html
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  #67  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2016, 10:26 PM
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CASA LOMA:
- Sir Henry Pellatt's castle, Casa Loma neighbourhood, North Toronto


To the North of central Toronto you find Casa Loma, an impressive house in gothic revival style. This is Toronto's own castle, formerly a mansion by Sir Henry Pellatt, built 1909-14. Pellatt became rich by providing electricity to Toronto's citizens. After Pellatt went bankrupt due to bad housing speculations, the city of Toronto bought it in 1937. Casa Loma has 98 rooms on seven floors. The grandiose interior is open to public (Grand Hall, bedrooms, bathrooms, garage, gardens etc), and can be visit. The exterior is quirky and features towers that look like they come from a medieval German castle. The architect, E.J. Lennox, also designed other famous Toronto landmarks. The Grand Hall is the center of the building, a two-storey atrium with expensive furniture. The Oak Room, Windsor Room, the library, Sir Henry's suite, mrs Pellatt's suite, bathrooms, the terrace, several other rooms and the gardens can all be visited. The rooms are complete with furniture, and you will find music instruments here and there. In the Oak Room you find a wing for example, and in the Grand Hall an organ. There is an exhibition about Toronto's past dark side, such at poverty and the great fire, in the somewhat creepy tunnels underneath. The tunnels take you to the garage and carriage building, that is situated several blocks away from the castle, and is an impressive building itself. Currently the garage and stable building has an exhibition of 1900s cars and wagons. In the castle there are also exhibitions about sculptures, art, military uniforms and contemporary clothes.

During the years, Casa Loma has been a popular filming location, for example X-Men and Cocktail were filmed there. The neighbourhood around the castle is also called Casa Loma. Casa Loma is very beautiful and a must visit when in Toronto. On a very hot and sunny day, we hopped on the Big Bus double decker, and made a stop at Casa Loma. It is a popular place for weddings, and during our visit there was one wedding. Casa Loma can also be rented, after closing hours.

Casa Loma 099 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 097 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 095 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 094 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 093 by Nightsky, on Flickr
INTERIOR:
Casa Loma 091 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 086 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 085 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 082 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 079 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 079 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 071 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 069 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Casa Loma 067 by Nightsky, on Flickr
http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Toronto_Casa_Loma.html
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  #68  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2016, 2:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beedok View Post
Dundas Square: Toronto's attempt at Shibuya.
This area of Toronto has been full of neon, billboards, and over the top advertising for a very long time. It's not attempting to be anyone. All that's happened is that Toronto refreshed, updated, and expanded it for the 21st century.
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  #69  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2016, 2:42 AM
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Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
You realize this area of Toronto has been full of neon, billboards, and over the top advertising for a very long time. It's not attempting to be anyone. All that's happened is that Toronto refreshed, updated, and expanded it for the 21st century.
I was saying that to head off the inevitable Time Square comparison everyone does by making it clear that other cities have such a thing. (And pointing out it looks far more like Tokyo than New York there.)
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  #70  
Old Posted Oct 15, 2016, 3:20 AM
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Casa Loma has been turned into a huge haunted house for the Halloween season, I really wanna check it out!
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  #71  
Old Posted Oct 15, 2016, 10:58 AM
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Originally Posted by softee View Post
Casa Loma has been turned into a huge haunted house for the Halloween season, I really wanna check it out!
This must look cool, I'm jealous at your Toronto citizens right now.
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  #72  
Old Posted Oct 15, 2016, 10:59 AM
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MORE CASA LOMA:

Casa Loma 063 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 058 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 054 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 053 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 051 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 050 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 045 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 044 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 035 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 033 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 030 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 029 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 028 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 027 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 026 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 020 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 016 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 013 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 006 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 001 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 158 by Nightsky, on Flickr

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Toronto_Casa_Loma.html
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  #73  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2016, 12:05 PM
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EVEN MORE CASA LOMA:

Casa Loma 155 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 154 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 148 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 147 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 146 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 145 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 138 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 136 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 134 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 133 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 129 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 127 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 126 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 125 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 124 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 123 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 113 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 111 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 106 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 105 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Casa Loma 103 by Nightsky, on Flickr

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Toronto_Casa_Loma.html
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  #74  
Old Posted Oct 22, 2016, 4:55 PM
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@ Nightsky

As a person from Malmö, do you feel more of a connection and association with Stockholm due to it being Swedish, or with Copenhagen for its proximity? And which do you personally prefer and why?
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  #75  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2016, 8:31 PM
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@ Nightsky

As a person from Malmö, do you feel more of a connection and association with Stockholm due to it being Swedish, or with Copenhagen for its proximity? And which do you personally prefer and why?
I don't want to take away the attention from Toronto, but as you ask I will have to answer. I have only been three times to Stockholm, but a hundred times to Copenhagen so naturally I feel more connection with Copenhagen, it is also more of a continental city, a very nice escape for the day (though Danish is not the easiest language to understand always). Stockholm is very beautiful too but more stiff then Cph, and it is always more relaxing to be abroad, so I would say the Danish capital.

Now when we are talking about it, I take the chance to promote my Copenhagen thread as well:

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=225262
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  #76  
Old Posted Oct 26, 2016, 4:38 PM
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YORKVILLE

Yorkville is a posh neighbourhood with some of the most expensive townhouses, condo skyscrapers and brand stores in the country. It is situated in Midtown Toronto, close to downtown, and just a couple of blocks of our hotel. On Yonge St, take west on Yorkville Avenue. Here you find the Four Seasons Hotel and Residences, built 2012, where Canada's most expensive penthouse recently was sold, and lots of speciality boutiques. The residence tower of Four Seasons has 55 floors and the hotel tower has 30 floors. Prada, Tiffany, Cartier, Hugo Boss, Bang and Olufsen, Maserati and Ferrari can all be found in Yorkville, many along Bloor Street. This is the area were most celebrities like to go and shop. Here you also find a small fire station, and the ultra luxury Hazelton Hotel, popular among celebrities. At the hotel you find Hazelton Avenue, also posh street with townhouses, leading to the more busy Davenport Road, a road that soon shifts to a somewhat less glamourus character, with a few dull highrise blocks. Originally a separate village, Yorkville was annexed into Toronto in 1883. One Bloor, a 76-storey, 257m tall glass scraper with curved balconies, almost completed during our visit in 2016. It is situated right next in the intersection Bloor St/Yonge St, at the border to Yorkville.
http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Toronto_Yorkville.html

Yorkville 13 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Yorkville 14 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Yorkville 15 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Yorkville 16 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Yorkville 17 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Yorkville 19 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Yorkville 20 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Yorkville 21 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Yorkville 22 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Yorkville 26 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Yorkville 01 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Yorkville 02 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Yorkville 04 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Yorkville 05 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Yorkville 06 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Yorkville 08 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Yorkville 09 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Yorkville 10 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Yorkville 11 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Yorkville 12 by Nightsky, on Flickr

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Toronto_Yorkville.html
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  #77  
Old Posted Oct 26, 2016, 4:40 PM
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ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM

Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) is Canada's largest art museum, and is situated at Bloor St in Yorkville. It is a museum of art, world culture and natural history, established in 1912. In 2007, Daniel Liebeskind designed a significant addition to the museum, the Crystal, that has became a landmark with its sharp angles and deconstructivist style. This odd, cool, futuristic building is a sharp contrast to the adjancent heritage buildings of the museum, and that is where the main entrance is. The facade consists of glass and a special fabricated aluminium.

Toronto Bus Tour 267 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Toronto Bus Tour 263 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Toronto Bus Tour 183 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Toronto Bus Tour 182 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Toronto Bus Tour 181 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Toronto Bus Tour 180 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Toronto Bus Tour 179 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Toronto Bus Tour 178 by Nightsky, on Flickr

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Toronto_Yorkville.html
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  #78  
Old Posted Oct 27, 2016, 12:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightsky View Post
I don't want to take away the attention from Toronto, but as you ask I will have to answer. I have only been three times to Stockholm, but a hundred times to Copenhagen so naturally I feel more connection with Copenhagen, it is also more of a continental city, a very nice escape for the day (though Danish is not the easiest language to understand always). Stockholm is very beautiful too but more stiff then Cph, and it is always more relaxing to be abroad, so I would say the Danish capital.

Now when we are talking about it, I take the chance to promote my Copenhagen thread as well:

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=225262
That's quite interesting! I looked at the thread and it makes me want to visit the city. In most of the pictures I've seen before, somehow Stockholm seemed more appealing, but I may have mis-judged.

Either they, they both seem quite different than Toronto, so it must have been a real contrast as a visitor.
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Old Posted Nov 2, 2016, 1:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nouvellecosse View Post
That's quite interesting! I looked at the thread and it makes me want to visit the city. In most of the pictures I've seen before, somehow Stockholm seemed more appealing, but I may have mis-judged.

Either they, they both seem quite different than Toronto, so it must have been a real contrast as a visitor.
In some way Stockholm is cleaner, have more open water and more beautiful buildings then Copenhagen but as a Swede the cosmopolitan atmosphere in Copenhagen is more appealing, that we don't have much of here in Sweden.
Yes Toronto is very different from anything in Europe (though parts remind me of London) and thus very exciting, it's more like New York for me, but a bit smaller. Love Toronto!
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Old Posted Nov 2, 2016, 1:40 PM
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CHINATOWN:

Chinatown is very authentic and one of the largest in North America. It was well established already in 1935. Here you find Chinese stores and restaurants, all with typical chinese signs. It is situated around Spadina Avenue and Dundas St West, just northwest of downtown. Formerly it was situated near the City Hall, but it had to move westward because of the construction of the new city hall. Chinese restaurants, bakeries , cheap souvenir shops, grocery stores, markets and malls with colourful chinese signs can be found here. Many visitors compare it to Hong Kong. Old Chinatown as this one is called, is the largest of approximately six chinatowns in Greater Toronto! At Spadina Crescent, a circular traffic circle just at the North borders to Chinatown, there is a significant heritage building, currently under reconstruction. It is a yellow brick gothic revival building, that will host University of Toronto's faculty of architecture, design and lanscape. Royal Museum of Ontario is also bordering Old Chinatown.

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Toronto_Chinatown.html


Chinatown Toronto 19 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Chinatown Toronto 16 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Chinatown Toronto 21 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Chinatown Toronto 22 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Chinatown Toronto 20 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Chinatown Toronto 18 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Chinatown Toronto 13 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Chinatown Toronto 12 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Chinatown Toronto 11 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Chinatown Toronto 10 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Chinatown Toronto 08 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Chinatown Toronto 07 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Chinatown Toronto 06 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Chinatown Toronto 03 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Chinatown Toronto 02 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Chinatown Toronto 43 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Chinatown Toronto 24 by Nightsky, on Flickr

http://www.worldtravelimages.net/Toronto_Chinatown.html
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