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  #23681  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2014, 1:16 AM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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Good find FredH.




Dotty Dean 633 S. Broadway

tumblr/memoriastoica




transformed into Le Roy's Jewelers

tumblr/memoriastoica





..and here is 633 S. Broadway today

GSV

-damn, talk about ruining a building. -sheesh!


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Last edited by ethereal_reality; Sep 16, 2014 at 2:08 AM.
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  #23682  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2014, 1:20 AM
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HossC HossC is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post

... just last week I came across this very intriguing photograph that shows a tunnel on the Raymond Hotel property.


eBay

I don't remember discussing such a tunnel, even though we've visited the Raymond Hotel numerous times.
I know the hotel sits atop a large hill, so I initially thought this might be a service tunnel.
The size of the trees made me think it was likely to be the second Raymond Hotel, built after the first burned down. This has also been discussed here previously - there's a nice 1906 view in post #4194. Below is a 1918 aerial view which I believe is new to this thread. The golf course and grounds used to extend to where Garfield Park is today!


USC Digital Library

Then I found a reference to the tunnel in an article on www.kcet.org:

With 400 rooms, golf links, and formal gardens, the Raymond's second iteration was even grander than the first. At the entrance, a new floral display, augmented by 575 electric lights, announced in ten brightly colored letters that visitors had arrived at "THE RAYMOND." Guests then entered a tunnel -- which still exists today, though sealed, under Raymond Hill -- and ascended into the hotel via elevator.

There's a close-up view of the tunnel entrance in a book called 'South Pasadena' by Rick Thomas:


books.google.com

Unsurprisingly, the tunnel is also mentioned in 'South Pasadena's Raymond Hotel', also by Rick Thomas. This book says that the waiting station in the caption above was restored in 1978. The road in the picture below is Mockingbird Lane. I took the Googlemobile to the same spot, but couldn't work out exactly where the entrance used to be.


books.google.com
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  #23683  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2014, 1:31 AM
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"The tunnel was then resealed." Wow, so it's still there.
Good work HossC....very good work.
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  #23684  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2014, 1:57 AM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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photoshop before photoshop.

-aeroplane 1912.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/C-1912-LOS-A...item4adc292ee5





...and here is an extra-LARGE scan, so we can all savor Los Angeles, circa 1912, that appears below the 'airplane'.


http://www.ebay.com/itm/C-1912-LOS-A...item4adc292ee5
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Last edited by ethereal_reality; Sep 16, 2014 at 2:53 AM.
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  #23685  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2014, 3:17 AM
Lorendoc Lorendoc is offline
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Silver Republicans

Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Here's a bit of a mystery (to me anyway...I've never heard of a Silver Republican Club)
Political party. In the Gilded Age, the Republicans were the party of the wealthy industrialists, the Democrats were the agrarian and immigrant party.

The debtor class (farmers and city workers) favored inflationary monetary policies, such as going off the gold standard ("You shall not crucify mankind upon a cross of gold") in favor of bimetallism or "Free Silver." Monetizing silver would have increased money in circulation, hence devaluing the currency. If the dollar was worth less today than it was when a debt was incurred, the debtor wins.

The Silver Republicans were a small set of wealthy western silver mine owners whose personal economic interests ran counter to their party interests. They didn't last long.

Last edited by Lorendoc; Sep 16, 2014 at 4:03 AM.
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  #23686  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2014, 6:05 AM
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Pasadena used to be ''DRY"....

Quote:
Originally Posted by HossC View Post
The size of the trees made me think it was likely to be the second Raymond Hotel, built after the first burned down. This has also been discussed here previously - there's a nice 1906 view in post #4194. Below is a 1918 aerial view which I believe is new to this thread. The golf course and grounds used to extend to where Garfield Park is today!


USC Digital Library

Then I found a reference to the tunnel in an article on www.kcet.org:

With 400 rooms, golf links, and formal gardens, the Raymond's second iteration was even grander than the first. At the entrance, a new floral display, augmented by 575 electric lights, announced in ten brightly colored letters that visitors had arrived at "THE RAYMOND." Guests then entered a tunnel -- which still exists today, though sealed, under Raymond Hill -- and ascended into the hotel via elevator.

There's a close-up view of the tunnel entrance in a book called 'South Pasadena' by Rick Thomas:
The dining room was the largest room in the house, able to seat 400 people. Pasadena City, which boasted of being a “dry” town, had an ordinance disallowing the sales of alcohol — except to the hotel guests.

If you stayed at the Raymond you could booze it up 24/7.



wiki image
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  #23687  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2014, 12:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post

Here's a bit of a mystery (to me anyway...I've never heard of a Silver Republican Club)

Los Angeles 1909

tumblr/memoriastoica

Only one directory had any information on 'silver republican'.
The 1898 L.A. City Directory. -533 S. Main

It would be fun to locate this house in one of the early panoramas that we've seen from USC.
I've haven't found the building in any panoramas yet, but I'm thinking that this is the Main Street address, although no later than 1900. When I Googled the Silver Republican Club, I got a few references to a 1943 journal article by Harold F. Taggart which appeared in The Quarterly: Historical Society of Southern California, Vol. 25, No. 3. Luckily, I found a link to a PDF version of the article on phdtree.org. From the article:

Soon after the [1894] election the Silver Republican Club moved into its new quarters, a two story frame house of 14 rooms at 533 South Main street, opposite the Burbank Theatre and near the Athletic Club and the Concordia Club. A reading room was equipped with magazines and newspapers, a second room was made into a library, a third fitted with billiard tables, and a fourth arranged for cards and other games, while the largest room became the assembly hall. The kitchen and dining rooms were put to their appropriate use; daily twenty or thirty of the members lunched at the club, although several complained that the club house was too far out. No liquor was served.

The Club didn't exist for very long. The article closes with the following:

On November 28, 1900, just before he left for the East, [Nathan] Cole made a statement to the newspapers, which marks the end of Silver Republicanism in California:
I believe the silver Republican organization will be abandoned and the party incorporated with the democracy. Personally I shall henceforth act with that party. I am satisfied it is the duty of silver Republicans everywhere to stand by the party which has made such a gallant fight for the principles and men so dear to our oragnization. Besides it may be necessary for us to become democrats in order to help hold that party in line with its own profession of faith. The democratic party has ceased to be conservative. It is radical and must continue so. If anything it must go forward. It cannot retrograde and live. I am still in favor of the Chicago and Kansas City platforms. I am still for [William Jennings] Bryan. I think he is the inspiring leader of democratic hosts and must continue to be their leader.
I also found this small piece in the 2 October 1897 edition of the Los Angeles Herald.


California Digital Newspaper Collection

Could this be the old clubhouse to the left of The Brennan on the 1910 Baist map? In 1911 the Optic Theatre opened at 533 S Main. Two years later, the Brennan suffered a devastating fire - see post #11832 by tovangar2.


www.historicmapworks.com

For anyone who's interested, USC has a zoomable version of the original picture.
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  #23688  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2014, 2:17 PM
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Grauman's Chinese Theater on "Breakfast Matinee" day, February 26, 1941

Kurt from at graumanschinese.org provided me this shot of Grauman’s. It’s unusual in that it was taken on February 26, 1941, the one day that the theater offered a “Breakfast Matinee.” The doors opened at 7:00 AM and served a menu of pancakes and eggs for early-rising filmgoers. I wonder how many people showed up to wolf down their breakfast while watching “Andy Hardy's Private Secretary” and “Dr. Kildare’s Crisis.”

FYI: http://graumanschinese.org/ has indexed every film that's ever played at Grauman's, including dates, posters and links to IMDB.

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  #23689  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2014, 3:52 PM
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LOL! That 1912 airplane is powered by a nice bronze cash register.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
photoshop before photoshop.

-aeroplane 1912.



...and here is an extra-LARGE scan, so we can all savor Los Angeles, circa 1912, that appears below the 'airplane'.


http://www.ebay.com/itm/C-1912-LOS-A...item4adc292ee5
__
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  #23690  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2014, 3:53 PM
so-cal-bear so-cal-bear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorendoc View Post
Political party. In the Gilded Age, the Republicans were the party of the wealthy industrialists, the Democrats were the agrarian and immigrant party.

The debtor class (farmers and city workers) favored inflationary monetary policies, such as going off the gold standard ("You shall not crucify mankind upon a cross of gold") in favor of bimetallism or "Free Silver." Monetizing silver would have increased money in circulation, hence devaluing the currency. If the dollar was worth less today than it was when a debt was incurred, the debtor wins.

The Silver Republicans were a small set of wealthy western silver mine owners whose personal economic interests ran counter to their party interests. They didn't last long.
Some things never do change, do they?
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  #23691  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2014, 5:42 PM
Retired_in_Texas Retired_in_Texas is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MartinTurnbull View Post
Kurt from at graumanschinese.org provided me this shot of Grauman’s. It’s unusual in that it was taken on February 26, 1941, the one day that the theater offered a “Breakfast Matinee.” The doors opened at 7:00 AM and served a menu of pancakes and eggs for early-rising filmgoers. I wonder how many people showed up to wolf down their breakfast while watching “Andy Hardy's Private Secretary” and “Dr. Kildare’s Crisis.”

FYI: http://graumanschinese.org/ has indexed every film that's ever played at Grauman's, including dates, posters and links to IMDB.

I may be mistaken, but as I recall in the post WWII era they served lunch during a matinee. Whether it was a daily thing or just once a week I don't recall, nor have I been able to find a single photo of tables in the auditorium which i do remember being there in 1947-48.
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  #23692  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2014, 5:47 PM
Retired_in_Texas Retired_in_Texas is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
photoshop before photoshop.

-aeroplane 1912.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/C-1912-LOS-A...item4adc292ee5





...and here is an extra-LARGE scan, so we can all savor Los Angeles, circa 1912, that appears below the 'airplane'.


http://www.ebay.com/itm/C-1912-LOS-A...item4adc292ee5
__
Great photo, but can anyone even begin to imagine flying around in that contraption with not even a seat belt to keep you from being blown out of it by a sudden gust of wind.
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  #23693  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2014, 6:07 PM
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Here's a nice color slide of the Shrine Auditorium in the 1950s.

ebay
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  #23694  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2014, 6:12 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MartinTurnbull View Post
Kurt from at graumanschinese.org provided me this shot of Grauman’s. It’s unusual in that it was taken on February 26, 1941, the one day that the theater offered a “Breakfast Matinee.”

FYI: http://graumanschinese.org/ has indexed every film that's ever played at Grauman's, including dates, posters and links to IMDB.

Thanks for the photo and link. I'd never heard of a Breakfast Matinee, much less at the Chinese. This is an interesting site with all kinds of fascinating stuff, although I wish some of the photos were linked to larger sizes!

The site brings to mind--as readers may know, the theatre is now known as the TCL Chinese Theatre, which I cannot bear to say...it'll always be Grauman's to most Hollywood history fans or just the Chinese Theatre at the very least, but I've noticed whenever it's referenced on news programs they always say TCL Chinese Theatre as though it's a requirement they have to say that. I wonder why? If I were a reporter I'd just say the Chinese Theatre.
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  #23695  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2014, 6:12 PM
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"Elmer Dickens Eggs & Chickens billboards, Los Angeles CA -Boyle Heights, possibly Pico Blvd."


ebay

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Last edited by ethereal_reality; Sep 18, 2014 at 11:56 PM.
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  #23696  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2014, 6:19 PM
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This elaborate "Victorian" is quite remarkable!

Los Angeles

ebay

At first, I thought this couldn't be Los Angeles, but then I noticed the hills in the background on the right.
It's hard to believe I've never seen this home before...unless I simply forgot about it (which seems unlikely...it's pretty unforgettable isn't it!?)

__




Here's how it appeared on ebay, with Los Angeles written across the top (and I adjusted the colors a bit)

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Sep 16, 2014 at 9:49 PM.
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  #23697  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2014, 7:00 PM
Retired_in_Texas Retired_in_Texas is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
This extremely elaborate Victorian is quite remarkable! (I found it on ebay last night)

Los Angeles


At first, I thought this couldn't be Los Angeles, but then I noticed the hills in the background on the right.
It's hard to believe I've never seen this home before...unless I simply forgot about it (which seems unlikely...it's pretty unforgettable isn't it!?)
__




Here's how it appeared on ebay, with Los Angeles written across the top (and I adjusted the colors a bit)
"Elaborate Victorian?" Not to be argumentative but I'd be more prone to describe it as a Gingerbread. An overly busy one at that.
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  #23698  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2014, 8:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
This extremely elaborate Victorian is quite remarkable! (I found it on ebay last night)

Los Angeles


At first, I thought this couldn't be Los Angeles, but then I noticed the hills in the background on the right.
It's hard to believe I've never seen this home before...unless I simply forgot about it (which seems unlikely...it's pretty unforgettable isn't it!?)
__


When I studied architectural history in college, we called this Neo Gothic...Gothic Revival or Victorian Gothic.

This house is particularly intense with detail...almost too much. It kind of hurts my eyes to look at it.
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  #23699  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2014, 10:55 PM
3940dxer 3940dxer is offline
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e_r's innaugural Noirish Los Angeles photo - part 2

In this post I'll post some "now" versions of e_r's inaugural photo on NLA.

First, a little background info about how I found the location. In a post here a year or so ago, when I floated the idea of capturing a modern version of this image, ProphetM replied, suggesting the area around Lilac Terrace and Dodger Stadium. An initial field trip to Lilac Terrace proved that he was entirely correct. Predating the stadium by many years, Lilac Terrace is an old street that appears on many early maps. It even seems to appear (albeit un-named) on the 1909 hand-drawn aerial that we've seen here at times.

While Lilac Terrace allows easy access to the right location, I quickly learned that I couldn't get my now photo from that street -- a large Fire Dept. training tower and numerous trees now block the view. There's a mostly bare hillside above Lilac, but access is blocked by a chain link fence and many NO TRESPASSING signs are posted. So I started looking at locations around the parking lots at the stadium. The Dodgers had several night games last month and I found that an hour or so after the games begin, you can enter the lots without paying and kind of do your thing. A few spots around the stadium seemed promising but in each case, trees and bushes stopped me from getting the right view. Also, I realized that all the possible stadium spots were too high, and gave the wrong perspective.

After a few more visits, I found a hidden opening in the fence, which allowed access to the hillside between Lilac Terrace and the stadium. Two clues in the original photograph helped me pinpoint the best spot. If you look closely, you can see that the corner of the upper left roof line of the Hall Of Justice lines up very closely with the left edge of City Hall. Also, 7 1/2 stories of the middle section of City Hall are visible above the Hall Of Justice. Hiking around the hillside while checking these details with binoculars, I found an unobstructed spot with almost exactly the same view. There's a paved pathway there, which may have been built for fire access or to manage water runoff. Over the course of several days and nights this became "my spot". I believe that the original photographer stood either in this same spot, or atop the LAFD fire tower.

So with that introduction, here are the original photo with and without annotations, my daytime photo with and without annotations, and a night time photo. I hasten to add that the night shot was not taken by me, but by my friend Joe Sidore. (I learned that night time skylines are really hard to capture properly. With my limited skill set and mid-range camera, the results were disappointing. Joe, thanks for saving me!)


http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/se...1/order/nosort


http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/se...1/order/nosort

The culmination of my little project, this wonderful night time view, which I won't compromise with graphics or text:


Joe Sidore (Thank you Joe, for this fantastic contribution to the thread!)

My daytime photo, with annotations:

My photo

And without:

My photo

I don't think much explanation is needed but referring to the daytime shot; some brief notes:

#8, the Roybal Federal Bldg., and #9, the Metro Detention Center, are near the southwest corner of Alameda and Aliso Streets.

#11, the LAFD tower, is part of a large Fire Department training center. (That campus is open to the public and is quite interesting, in and of itself. There's a 9/11 memorial near the entrance with a large piece of steel framework that was salvaged from the World Trade Center. More on this in a future post, maybe.)

#12, the new Water District building, is between Union Station and the 101 freeway.

#17, the new Metro HQ building, is behind Union Station, just south of Cesar Chavez Ave.

#19, the new Chinatown Gold Line station, is at the northwest corner of Spring and College streets.

#20, the sprawling Twin Towers Correctional Facility, is near the southeast corner of Bauchet and Vignes streets.

One aspect of this project disappointed me. Despite much effort, I was unable to identify many of the buildings in Chinatown, or any of the buildings in the north Bunker Hill area. Though many of these structures are clearly visible in the original shot, I couldn't really match any of them up with the homes and businesses that still stand in this area. I walked all of the streets in that area, enlargements of the original photo in hand, hoping to find just one -- without success. Maybe someone else can identify one or two that survive.

Thanks again to all who helped!

Last edited by 3940dxer; Dec 8, 2014 at 3:39 AM.
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  #23700  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2014, 11:13 PM
Retired_in_Texas Retired_in_Texas is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug View Post
When I studied architectural history in college, we called this Neo Gothic...Gothic Revival or Victorian Gothic.

This house is particularly intense with detail...almost too much. It kind of hurts my eyes to look at it.
Regardless of what one might call the style, if one knocked on the door they would expect Lurch to open it.
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