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  #1  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2013, 3:44 PM
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More than two million people could call Edmonton area home in next 35 years

Well.. I guess my intention of living in a small town in Beaumont is going out the window. I've already seen a lot of change in no time, but these projections are brutal.

It would be nice to compare this projected growth against other major Canadians cities to see how we would move up in the ranks.

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...617/story.html
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Old Posted Jan 19, 2013, 10:49 PM
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I just hope we see the opportunity to intensify our current urban cores.
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Old Posted Jan 20, 2013, 4:55 AM
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Intensification doesn't seem to be the priority in the future, given how Beaumont is going to more than quadruple its current population, and make room through annexing more land...
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Old Posted Jan 20, 2013, 5:03 PM
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It's going to be hard to change.

I am all for cities become more dense, but it's near impossible to changed people's habits. I lived in a condo in downtown my early 20's in Windsor, ON, and then up till I was in my late had a row house in downtown in St. John's, NL. But, now with kids, a place like Beaumont makes more sense, you get a larger house with a yard and privacy that you cannot get in the city. It creates mixed feelings as I think cities need to build up more and be walk-able etc.. However, I am selfish and want to live the exact opposite for myself.
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Old Posted Jan 20, 2013, 6:09 PM
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Which leads me into my 'our city is a product of how we choose to live within it'.
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Old Posted Jan 20, 2013, 8:46 PM
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All major cities grow out and grow up. That's just how it is. There will always be a market for those who want a new home in a suburban neighbourhood and there will always be a market for those who want a house in a mature neighbourhood. As our city grows other factors that influence where people decide to live will become more important. Eg. commuting times, access to transit and good schools, proximity to employment, etc. We're a city in transition.
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Old Posted Jan 20, 2013, 9:14 PM
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Wanting to move to a single-detached home with a yard doesn't need to warrant new residential neighbourhood construction. There are already plenty of options in established and mature neighbourhoods, just look at how many young families are moving into Alberta Avenue.
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Old Posted Jan 20, 2013, 10:10 PM
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^ It shouldn't warrant new construction, but sadly we've based a lot of our economy in North America around that. Personally I don't know why anyone would want a new home. I live in a satellite community, but the house I purchased last year is 32 years old. I just like the small town feel with big city access now that I have children.
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Old Posted Jan 20, 2013, 11:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrChills View Post
^ It shouldn't warrant new construction, but sadly we've based a lot of our economy in North America around that. Personally I don't know why anyone would want a new home. I live in a satellite community, but the house I purchased last year is 32 years old. I just like the small town feel with big city access now that I have children.
For the same reason that people want a new car. It's personal choice.

@Harrison - there simply is not enough inventory in existing neighbourhoods to accommodate demand.
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Old Posted Jan 21, 2013, 12:01 AM
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The new houses that get built in Alberta Ave area get snatched up as fast as they are built. There's been a lot of infill activity, but if they're only adding two or three dozen new homes a year, that's only a tiny number of new homes vs. what gets built in one brand new tract housing subdivision during that same time frame.

Plus its a lot easier to buy in a new tract housing development. They have a bunch of show homes, you can pick the lot you want... etc. In a mature central neighborhood, you're limited to what comes on the market.
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Old Posted Jan 22, 2013, 3:32 PM
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^We are seeing increased activity (both builders and buyers) for infill housing product in Edmonton (and even in St. Albert, Sherwood Park). There is a reason why many traditional greenfield builders are starting to enter the infill market (e.g Parkwood Homes). I also think a greater proportion of the next generation of home buyers and downsizers will be looking at infill / mature communities. We have seen this trend taking place in other cities and are starting to see the signs here.
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Old Posted Jan 22, 2013, 3:49 PM
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^ I don't doubt it.. in fact I've seen it first hand.

It would be nice to see the pace of greenfield subdivisions slow down, and hopefully that'll happen. But people buy way out there for a reason.. And the type of person or family that is going to buy an infill property in Alberta Ave or Westmount is different than the type that's going to go to a brand new subdivision on the edge of town. It's easier and more convenient, people get more options.. and the bigger one I think is the (perceived) exclusivity. A lot of people want to be surrounded by people exactly like them. You don't get that in mature enighborhoods.. even the higher end ones.
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Old Posted Jan 22, 2013, 4:07 PM
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Different strokes for different folks that's for sure, but the importance of (as you well know) making mature neighbourhoods more attractive/retaining infrastructure is key. We need to provide more reasons/value to consider these areas as viable options.

We also need the City/Developers/Communities to work to make infill less of a perceived or real obstacle/challenge.
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