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  #121  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 2:08 AM
badrunner badrunner is offline
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Originally Posted by ThePhun1 View Post
I can't say I agree with that. For LA's Downtown to be a popping, very important area, Hollywood would have had to have been in it or adjacent to it along with some movie studios.
Movie studios in DTLA? lol I'm starting to think that you've never been to LA if you really think a movie studio would make DTLA more vibrant. Do you have any idea what they're like at street level?
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  #122  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 2:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Quixote View Post
The comparisons to Miami/South Florida are equally superficial, if not more so. LA actually has way more in common with Houston than Miami.
How so? With LA and Miami, I'm looking at the multi-nodal nature of the metro, the urban-like beach culture compared to the inland suburban culture, the Latin influence, the African American influence in certain communities, and more so the dense streetcar suburb layout that makes up a good chunk of both cities and can be found in other towns in the metro areas.


I guess I can see similarities with Houston. Both it and LA have more diversity in people and economy and they both are the largest cities in the Sunbelt. But despite the new growth in townhouses( will will make it denser in the long run), Houston is not as cohesive like LA. It has lots of room to grow and took advantage of that historically. It's also newer in a sense of its urban growth. But in terms of built environment, LA and Southern California reminds me of South Florida more. Houston reminds me more of Dallas, New Orleans outside of the core, and most other Southern cities that are rising along with it.
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  #123  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 2:36 AM
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Originally Posted by badrunner View Post
Movie studios in DTLA? lol I'm starting to think that you've never been to LA if you really think a movie studio would make DTLA more vibrant. Do you have any idea what they're like at street level?
I clearly said "adjacent" to as well as "in." Where are you gonna put a movie studio in anyone's Downtown, at least in a major city?
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  #124  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 2:49 AM
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Originally Posted by ThePhun1 View Post
I clearly said "adjacent" to as well as "in." Where are you gonna put a movie studio in anyone's Downtown, at least in a major city?
Adjacent is equally bad. Why would you want to plop down an impenetrable urban fortress with no street level activity and no public access anywhere near the core of your city? It's literally the worst possible location. Both from the perspective of the studio and from the perspective of the neighborhood. What would it add to a neighborhood besides an endless stream of cars entering and exiting the front gate. They also take up a ton of space and are filled with ugly nondescript warehouse looking buildings. I could think of a million better ways to utilize that space.
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  #125  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 3:39 AM
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Los Angeles already has a movie/TV studio in downtown LA, or at least DTLA adjacent, on the west side of the 110 Freeway:

https://www.lacenterstudios.com/

It is indeed a veritable fortress. It's where the former Unocal headquarters was located.
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  #126  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 3:47 AM
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Originally Posted by jd3189 View Post
How so? With LA and Miami, I'm looking at the multi-nodal nature of the metro, the urban-like beach culture compared to the inland suburban culture, the Latin influence, the African American influence in certain communities, and more so the dense streetcar suburb layout that makes up a good chunk of both cities and can be found in other towns in the metro areas.
I don't agree with your observations.

Just about every major metro is "multinodal" to some degree (when will people actually come to this realization?); Miami-Dade County doesn't strike me as a stand-out metro in that regard. LA also isn't a true beach town even though it's been endlessly depicted as such in film and television. And LA's Latino culture is mostly Mexican/Central American, while Miami's is more Caribbean/South American. Warm-weather climate? There's a big difference between Mediterranean/dry and tropical/humid. Miami gets a ton of rainfall each year, while it "never rains in LA." One city has to deal with earthquakes/wildfires and the other hurricanes/floods.
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  #127  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 3:51 AM
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DTLA, and downtowns in general, aren't meant as one stop shops for anything and everything monopolizing every good thing in the city. Hollywood should be in Hollywood. And the beach and ports don't need to be in DTLA.
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  #128  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 8:03 AM
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Originally Posted by ocman View Post
DTLA, and downtowns in general, aren't meant as one stop shops for anything and everything monopolizing every good thing in the city. Hollywood should be in Hollywood. And the beach and ports don't need to be in DTLA.
Numerous Downtowns are situated next to their port. It's incredible how relatively bland DTLA is considering the amount of cultural attractions the area has overall. I like it just fine but it could be so much more. Pound for pound (again, I said pound for pound) I like Pasadena, Pomona and Long Beach's core areas more than LA's. And I definitely favor San Diego's over LA's overall.
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  #129  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 12:37 PM
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Originally Posted by sopas ej View Post
Los Angeles already has a movie/TV studio in downtown LA, or at least DTLA adjacent, on the west side of the 110 Freeway:

https://www.lacenterstudios.com/

It is indeed a veritable fortress. It's where the former Unocal headquarters was located.
Interesting. Driven by this place a thousand times and never knew it existed, which just goes to show how little impact it has in the area. It just doesn't engage with the neighborhood at all.
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  #130  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 12:45 PM
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Originally Posted by ThePhun1 View Post
Numerous Downtowns are situated next to their port. It's incredible how relatively bland DTLA is considering the amount of cultural attractions the area has overall. I like it just fine but it could be so much more. Pound for pound (again, I said pound for pound) I like Pasadena, Pomona and Long Beach's core areas more than LA's. And I definitely favor San Diego's over LA's overall.
Downtown Pomona? You must be trolling. I've been there and it's a ghost town, even when the LA county fair was going on just a stone's throw away. It's just too far away from the urban center. It has its charms but it's just like any other sleepy downtown area you find all over the IE.

Pomona does have twice the population density as Houston though. There's that.
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  #131  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 1:15 PM
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It's a ghost town if you don't know where to look.

I've had a ton of fun at Cal Poly's Downtown Center, which is the main attraction imo. There's a few other things of interest there too. I'll take that over Hollywood Blvd. any day.

And again, I said pound for pound, DTLA has more going for it because it's much bigger obviously.
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  #132  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 1:41 PM
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Originally Posted by ThePhun1 View Post
It's a ghost town if you don't know where to look.

I've had a ton of fun at Cal Poly's Downtown Center, which is the main attraction imo. There's a few other things of interest there too. I'll take that over Hollywood Blvd. any day.

And again, I said pound for pound, DTLA has more going for it because it's much bigger obviously.
Even pound for pound it doesn't compare. Pomona effectively functions as an LA exurb. Which is why it is comparatively high in density, but comparatively low in terms of street life and urban vitality. The gravity of urban, core LA just sucks in all the activity, all the best talent, and all the money from the whole region. You're trying to tell me that a sleepy bedroom community on the outskirts of LA county is somehow a more happening place (pound for pound) than the city that dominates the whole region. I mean, there are plenty of smaller cities that punch above their weight in the area - the beach cities, Pasadena, Glendale. Pomona isn't one of them. It's just too far away from the action.
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  #133  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 1:57 PM
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I clearly was referring to the Downtown areas alone. Obviously that's debateable as well.

If it wasn't for the historic area, Downtown LA would have the appeal of Downtown Dallas or Houston, which isn't terrible but certainly nothing special, not for a city of its size and with its cultural amenities.
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  #134  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 2:07 PM
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Originally Posted by ThePhun1 View Post
I clearly was referring to the Downtown areas alone. Obviously that's debateable as well.

If it wasn't for the historic area, Downtown LA would have the appeal of Downtown Dallas or Houston, which isn't terrible but certainly nothing special, not for a city of its size and with its cultural amenities.
Well, the historic core is about half of DTLA so yeah, if you took away half of DTLA, you'd have something resembling Dallas or Houston.
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  #135  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 2:11 PM
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btw, I was also speaking of downtown areas only. Look at downtown Glendale and compare it to downtown Pomona. No comparison. They are similar tier cities in terms of population. Location does matter.
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  #136  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 2:19 PM
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Originally Posted by badrunner View Post
Well, the historic core is about half of DTLA so yeah, if you took away half of DTLA, you'd have something resembling Dallas or Houston.
And the historic core is cool to see in person and on photos but not really worth going too far out of your way to visit unless you have business in the area.
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  #137  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 2:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quixote View Post
I don't agree with your observations.

Just about every major metro is "multinodal" to some degree (when will people actually come to this realization?); Miami-Dade County doesn't strike me as a stand-out metro in that regard. LA also isn't a true beach town even though it's been endlessly depicted as such in film and television. And LA's Latino culture is mostly Mexican/Central American, while Miami's is more Caribbean/South American. Warm-weather climate? There's a big difference between Mediterranean/dry and tropical/humid. Miami gets a ton of rainfall each year, while it "never rains in LA." One city has to deal with earthquakes/wildfires and the other hurricanes/floods.
Well, you pretty much shared some similarities already, despite them being general. Miami isn't a beach town either, and I was referring to the metros themselves in terms of their coastal beach towns ( Santa Monica/ South Beach) vs their more inland suburbs (Inland Empire/ Homestead,Loxahatchee, and everything bordering the Everglades.)


It could be said that most metros are multi-nodal, but many metros are still more heavily centralized ( ex. Chicagoland, Greater NYC, Seattle, Boston, Atlanta, etc). Those metros pretty much have all their major economic, political, and entertainment options in the central city while the other outer cities serve mainly as bedroom communities with some businesses here and there.

Although LA and Miami are the largest and most dominant cities of their respective metro areas, they aren't the main action around. At least in South Florida, you can live years in Palm Beach or Broward county without ever having to go to Miami Dade. West Palm Beach and Fort Lauderdale have good downtowns for their size and several other towns that complement them like Boca Raton, Delray, Pompano, Hollywood, etc.


Even in Miami Dade county, a lot of the action is in South Beach as opposed to downtown Miami, which is similar to Downtown LA in that it has some old bones but is still on the path of becoming "solid".

So it can be safe to say that LA shares some similarities and differences with its Sunbelt peers. The similarities don't demean it. In fact, it makes it a bit more familiar, at least for me.
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  #138  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 2:32 PM
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One way that I found Socal similar to South Florida is that every square inch of the urbanized area is either paved or landscaped. And the kind of landscaping is also very similar. I don't know if you'd put that under the "superficially similar" category though.
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  #139  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 2:34 PM
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Originally Posted by badrunner View Post
btw, I was also speaking of downtown areas only. Look at downtown Glendale and compare it to downtown Pomona. No comparison. They are similar tier cities in terms of population. Location does matter.
I've always questioned his knowledge of LA, and the Pomona comparison just proves my point. He has no idea what he's talking about.

Not to mention, what in Dallas or Houston compares to the Arts District, Little Tokyo, Chinatown, or the Fashion District? Please don't say Deep Ellum either. That place wouldn't stand out in LA whatsoever.

The Fashion District is messy and not everyone's cup of tea, but it is LARGE. If it was in any other sun belt city (except New Orleans or South Beach), it would be considered the most vibrant/urban neighborhood easily.

Last edited by LA21st; Jun 14, 2018 at 2:47 PM.
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  #140  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 2:35 PM
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Originally Posted by badrunner View Post
One way that I found Socal similar to South Florida is that every square inch of the urbanized area is either paved or landscaped. And the kind of landscaping is also very similar. I don't know if you'd put that under the "superficially similar" category though.
I don't see the Florida comparisons to LA either. LA seems to be much older and dense overall.
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