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  #45081  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2018, 11:53 PM
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628 and 636 S. Serrano Avenue

I posted a small photo of these two "mystery" houses previously, but I've just figured out where they were,
plus now the photo is zoomable so we can see them a little better.

February 27, 1916, Los Angeles Times:





ProQuest via LAPL


That's 628 on the left and 636 on the right, with a bit of 640 behind the palm. I'd guess this photo is c. 1918.
As far as I could tell, Hobart, Serrano and Oxford between 5th and Wilshire are the only north-south residential
streets in that part of town where the sidewalk is next to the curb, without a strip of grass between the two:



UCLA/Islandora


August 25, 1916, BP for 628-630 S. Serrano. There is a BP with the same date for 636-638 S. Serrano. The
Certificates of Occupancy for the two buildings are dated April 23, 1917:



LADBS


1921 Sanborn with north at right and 628 and 636 S. Serrano just left of center. I believe 610 and 616 (now 618)
are still standing:



ProQuest via LAPL


September 30, 1971, demo permit for 636 S. Serrano. There is a demo permit with the same date for 628:



LADBS


Here's a closer look at 636 and 640 S. Serrano from the photo above:




This is 628 S. Serrano:




This is 1125 (formerly 1121-23) 3rd Avenue, which I believe is the structure mentioned in the article at the top of this
post ("identical in plan with a flat being constructed by the same builder on Third Avenue, near Eleventh Street"):



June 2017 GSV


The BP for 1121-23 3rd Avenue has the same owner's last name, architect, and building dimensions, confirming what
was written in the article at the top of this post:



LADBS


The Beidlers' old home at 1133 3rd Avenue is still standing.
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  #45082  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2018, 12:18 AM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Many years before the now defunct Los Angeles amusement park Busch Gardens...


ebay


there was the world famous Busch Gardens in Pasadena.


ebay




usually referred to as the Busch 'sunken' Gardens.

ebay





larger view/simply beautiful

ebay




The Adolf Busch residence overlooking his beloved sunken gardens.

unknowned




hmmm...how many Busch residences were there? three...four?

ebay




interesting stats.

http://pasadenapio.blogspot.com/




rppc/ebay




I'm not sure if that's Helen Burke or Snow White?

rppc/ebay




and there was even a lake. (note the lone hilltop house in the far distance)

ebay




folder dated 1913.



ebay






rppc/ebay




one last view of the mill. Is that a stork on the chimney?

ebay




tourist's snapshots 1910s. (see the woman walking past the sculptured shrub) -reminds me of 'Last Year at Marienbad'.

ebay



ebay




The Busch 'eagle' in flowers/lower right

ebay





The borders of Adolf's Busch Gardens. This place was HUGE!


gsv

Bellafontaine Street is the northern border/ Madeline Drive is the southern.
__



1906 - Annheuser Busch residence, Pasadena
http://exhibits.sos.ca.gov/files/ori...ed47f81659.jpg
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  #45083  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2018, 12:27 AM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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Originally Posted by Tourmaline View Post
Thank you for posting the bridge-crossing photo. It is worth noting that vestiges of the Venice and Eastlake Rail works still exist at the Billy Jones Wildcat Railroad in Los Gatos.


http://bjwrr.org/wp-content/uploads/...00H267_O60.jpg

http://bjwrr.org/wp-content/uploads/...00H601_O60.jpg



Interweb sources describe Jones' i1939-discovery of the Venice Locomotive in San Francisco. He allegedly purchased it for $100 and the rest . . . is history. http://bjwrr.org/about/history/ and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_%22Billy%22_Jones Not surprisingly, a man named Disney took a keen interest in this miniature train.

A video of the BJWRR offering a taste of the Venice Loco can be seen here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_d2VwhnsC8


1915 - Venice Miniature RR traversing canal bridge
http://exhibits.sos.ca.gov/files/ori...9f2eb84186.jpg



1915 - Gondolas and Motor boat rides (Wonder about the dependability of the later in 1915? Is the artillery for show or was it defending against encroaching motor boat businesses? )
http://exhibits.sos.ca.gov/files/ori...6789dc9e0a.jpg




1911 - Foot traffic over Lion Canal Bridge
http://exhibits.sos.ca.gov/files/ori...8940890df5.jpg
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  #45084  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2018, 12:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post
...and those clunky stairs themselves. They make the place look like a school or post office or something...
You're right t2, they're completely oversized. (I hadn't noticed.....I was too busy counting the lamps. )
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  #45085  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2018, 12:49 AM
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Speaking of lamps and their placement.

posted by Tourmaline

tsk...tsk

i may be the only one, but shouldn't the lamps be at either end of the bridge.
that spot is where people should be able to stand and gaze down the length of the canal.

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Jan 22, 2018 at 1:57 AM.
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  #45086  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2018, 1:55 AM
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Excellent discovery Flyingwedge.

So the surviving flat on Serrano no doubt had that same elaborate freize. (now missing)
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  #45087  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2018, 2:05 AM
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crumbling infrastructure

Children playing in a canal, Venice California 1950s


EBAY

I didn't realize the canals were in that bad of shape in the 1950s.

it's possible the seller misdated the slide... does that look like a 1950s bicycle?



Here's a second slide.


EBAY

It was really dark so I tweaked it quite a bit-

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Jan 22, 2018 at 2:19 AM.
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  #45088  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2018, 2:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
You're right t2, they're completely oversized. (I hadn't noticed.....I was too busy counting the lamps. )
Just a thought on the stairs and all those those lights (18 total if there are three step lights per section plus the six lanterns). What's the point of the imposing (pretentious?) stairs? I'm assuming there's a quite a bit of parking space for guests on the other side of the porte cochere, so who'd be walking up those well-lit stairs?
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  #45089  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2018, 4:11 AM
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403 and 411 Carroll Canal

Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Children playing in a canal, Venice California 1950s


EBAY

I didn't realize the canals were in that bad of shape in the 1950s.

it's possible the seller misdated the slide... does that look like a 1950s bicycle?

Here's a second slide.


EBAY

It was really dark so I tweaked it quite a bit-

Those are nice photos; at first I thought a 1950s date was reasonable, but I think you're right about the bike.

The second and fourth houses from the left are the ones in your two photos, e_r. We're looking north from the
Dell Avenue bridge over Carroll Canal. The home with the arch over the entrance is 411 Carroll Canal, and second
from left is little 403. Google needs a gondola to get better views of those canal homes!



Jan 2016 GSV

Last edited by Flyingwedge; Jan 22, 2018 at 7:09 AM. Reason: not sure about date
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  #45090  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2018, 9:17 AM
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My first post here!

HOLY COW, some of you here are just AMAZING experts on the history of Los Angeles architecture. I thought that *I* knew this stuff, but so many of you here have simply blown me away with your expertise. I have learned so much in this thread, and I thank you all for it! Let me just say, this is the most amazing internet thread EVER.

Hello, this is my first post on the forum. I have lived my entire life in Los Angeles, and I absolutely love the beautiful old buildings, so many of which (see my avatar) we have lost in the name of “progress”.

I’ve been reading this thread for probably a year now. I had originally intended to not make any comments until I had caught up, but this thread is now over 2,000 pages long! I just passed page number 1007, and at the rate I’m going, I’m never gonna catch up!

With the help of you fine people, I now believe that I could easily navigate old LA if I were thrown into a time machine. I could explore the beautiful, long-gone tunnels on Hill and on Broadway. I could make my way around the much-missed Bunker Hill, visit the Bradbury Mansion, and ride down Court Flight. And I could find myself a good lunch in the original Chinatown. And boy, would it be a pleasure to do it!

Anyways, here’s my thanks to all of you people who have made this such an amazing thread‼



PS: If any of you would like to tell us how you became such experts on the history of Los Angeles architecture, I’d love to hear your stories!
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  #45091  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2018, 10:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Charles View Post
HOLY COW, some of you here are just AMAZING experts on the history of Los Angeles architecture. I thought that *I* knew this stuff, but so many of you here have simply blown me away with your expertise. I have learned so much in this thread, and I thank you all for it! Let me just say, this is the most amazing internet thread EVER.


PS: If any of you would like to tell us how you became such experts on the history of Los Angeles architecture, I’d love to hear your stories!
Here is my answer and welcome to this Forum. I arrived in LA on a train with my mother and brother when WW II was still blazing. So when you've lived here that long, one has a lot of associations and memories of this city.
But keep in mind that the Forum was started by ER and he only spent a few years here.... and has an amazing encyclopedic knowledge of LA.
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  #45092  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2018, 11:10 AM
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Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug View Post
Here is my answer and welcome to this Forum. I arrived in LA on a train with my mother and brother when WW II was still blazing. So when you've lived here that long, one has a lot of associations and memories of this city.
But keep in mind that the Forum was started by ER and he only spent a few years here.... and has an amazing encyclopedic knowledge of LA.
Well, that’s one way to learn a lot about a place, Doug… by actually living there! Thank-you for the welcome! I guess you just missed out on coming into La Grande Station, one of my favorite structures of early LA, seeing as how it closed in 1939. Or perhaps you actually saw it, as it wasn’t demolished until 1946?

I was only born in 1966, so most of the beautiful buildings in this thread were long-gone by the time I was old enough to visit them. If I were you, I don’t think I would have been able to take it… watching all these beautiful buildings (let alone, actual HILLS like Bunker Hill itself!) simply vanish, one by one! But at the same time, I envy you for being able to have experienced so much of what remained of early-era Los Angeles in person! I’d kill to see what you have seen!

My mother took me for a ride on Angels Flight during its final days in 1969. I like to believe that I remember this happening, and though I have no memories of the top or the bottom of the flight, I feel certain that I can remember looking down the tracks as we rode towards the bottom, from the viewpoint of my mother’s lap. Then again, I was only three at the time, and you know what they say about false memories!

I’ve certainly noticed many of ER’s posts in this thread, and they are among the best and most informative posts here! I had no idea that he started this great forum, however - thanks, ER, this is the best place ever!


Last edited by Scott Charles; Jan 22, 2018 at 11:28 AM.
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  #45093  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2018, 2:24 PM
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Re 628 & 636 S Serrano...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyingwedge View Post

[/URL]

ProQuest via LAPL






UCLA/Islandora



LAT Feb 23, 1919


These buildings reminded me of Charles H. Thompson, a Chicago-area real estate developer who built 100 Fremont Place (see its story HERE).

Charles H. Thompson built at least one project in Los Angeles--I dug through some of my old notes, from 2012 about 100 FP--in them I wrote down that there was, circa 1919, another Charles H. Thompson operating in LA, this one a manager for the Frank Meline Company in charge of numerous projects for that concern--as well as, to add to the confusion, an automobile dealer by the same name much mentioned in newspaper reports.

Anyway, the projects I noted of the C H Thompson of 100 Fremont Place are the twin apartment buildings still at 700 and 708 South New Hampshire Avenue at the southeast corner of West 7th Street (across from 701, where Mary Miles Minter once lived--I thought we'd looked into that house, but I couldn't find a post). The building permits for 700 and 708 were issued on September 6, 1918, and list C H Thompson, address 100 Fremont Place, as the owner as well as the architect and contractor-- after I saw your images, FW, I was almost certain that I'd find H. J. Knauer's name on the permits as architect. Thompson is named on the documents as owner and builder of his house at 100 FP, though not specifically as architect...I can't help but wonder if Knauer was somehow involved....
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  #45094  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2018, 4:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyingwedge View Post

The second and fourth houses from the left are the ones in your two photos, e_r. We're looking north from the
Dell Avenue bridge over Carroll Canal. The home with the arch over the entrance is 411 Carroll Canal, and second
from left is little 403. Google needs a gondola to get better views of those canal homes!



Jan 2016 GSV
In the season 6 (1982/3) episode of "CHiPs" called "Foxtrap", the female band ("The Cadillac Foxes", fronted by Laura Branigan) stays at 403 Carroll Canal. It doesn't get much screentime, but I'd say that the area was already far tidier than in e_r's pictures.


MGM TV/Rosner TV

The property websites list 403 Carroll Canal as "1 bed 1 bath 640 sqft", and built in 1923. It last sold in December 1997 for $357,272. 411 Carroll Canal is "2 beds 2 baths 1,530 sqft", and built in 1919. It was last sold in July 2002 for $1,600,000. Current estimates are over $2 million each. Who'd have thought it looking at the vintage photos?

-----------

Welcome to the thread, Scott Charles. This post actually ties in nicely with your question. I first found NLA when I was looking for "CHiPs" filming locations. Every time I tried to find the location of building which had since been demolished, I ended up here. As soon as I started reading from page 1, I was hooked!
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  #45095  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2018, 5:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
I thought this was interesting.


Nautilus 1906

We discussed the Worlds Fair searchlight in the early days of the thread, but I don't remember discussing how it was powered. (maybe I just forgot)


below / from GIZMODO

"When running at 200 amperes—a current generated by a Pelton water wheel in a nearby canyon—the carbon arc lamp burned with the intensity
of 90,000 to 100,000 candles. A massive reflecting lens mirror magnified that blaze to 375 million candlepower.
"


Does anyone know in which canyon this Pelton water wheel was located?
___



#2: location of searchlight in relation to the observatory:


ebay find [dated: 1908]

Is this view about 1,500 ft from the observatory?

-was the searchlight in this area in the foreground / where the photographer was standing?

__
The Pelton Water Wheel was located in Rubio Canyon.

Mount Lowe Preservation Society


"At the Rubio division terminus was built a broad platform to span the Canyon which included the Rubio Pavilion, a 12-room hotel, with dining facilities and other amenities. The pavilion also consisted of power generating facilities with the use of gas engines and Pelton waterwheels. Water was made available from reservoirs built in the canyon’s streams, though water was not always plentiful year round. As part of the entertainment experience, Lowe had a series of stairways and bridges built over the streams and waterfalls that emanated from the canyon. The eleven waterfalls were individually named and today exist as local historical landmarks.
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Lowe_Railway

The searchlight was atop the (White City) powerhouse just behind of where the photographer is standing in your photo.



Andys

Last edited by Andys; Jan 22, 2018 at 9:42 PM.
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  #45096  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2018, 5:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug View Post
I agree ER....The whole project has become grotesque.
As we used to say at Art Center College of Design...'Less is more'...and 'Its not what you add, but what you leave out.'
Maybe they have a brother-in-law in the wholesale light fixture business......
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  #45097  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2018, 3:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ANDYS
The searchlight was atop the (White City) powerhouse just behind of where the photographer is standing in your photograph.
I didn't know it was named 'White City' Andys; although it makes sense. The World Columbian Exposition, where the searchlight came from, was known
in the press as the 'White City'. (the majoritiy of the buildings at the fair were painted white) -esp the largest buildings facing the Grand Basin


"just behind of where the photographer is standing in your photograph" - ANDYS

my pic again with a comparison photo




So I take it- the searchlight pavillion replaced the smallish building with the sign on the roof. (shown above )


Here's a better look at the building.


flickr



In this photograph, the building with the sign is mostly hidden behind the people on the Rubio incline car.





Here is the same view after the 'White City' pavillion and searchlight are in place.




Most of you probably knew all this already, but I decided to go ahead and post it.

Go HERE to see the searchlight at World Columbian Exposition in Chicago. [1893]
__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Jan 23, 2018 at 3:46 AM.
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  #45098  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2018, 3:43 AM
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CityBoyDoug CityBoyDoug is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post




Most of you probably knew all this already, but I decided to go ahead and post it.

__
I hate going on these steep rides. I know its probably safe but please...no thanks.
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  #45099  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2018, 3:47 AM
Retired_in_Texas Retired_in_Texas is offline
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Originally Posted by Krell58 View Post
Yes, I, believe so.
Most likely to make the polls so near a road more visible at night considering automobile headlights were not much in those times.
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  #45100  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2018, 3:50 AM
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Here's one more photograph:

A small portion of the 'White City' pavillion can be seen on the left edge of the photo.


Huntington Archive

I'm done.
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