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  #10581  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2018, 2:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Capsicum View Post
The "model minority" discourse in the US has been used for minorities (Jewish Americans, Asian Americans etc.) who achieved higher socio-economic levels than the average, but has also been critiqued or argued by some to be used as a foil against the other, historically marginalized minorities who had lower socio-economic status, and the social issues they faced. Often some claim it was used to downplay the disadvantages some minorities faced (eg. if group X can make it, why can't group Y etc.).

I'm not sure to what extent people think there's an element of that in Canada though. Do people really compare and contrast "model minorities" vs. minorities who have or had historically more socio-economic issues and societal problems (whether it's other visible minorities or the native population), as much here?
I only used it because I thought it would be something people here could relate to. It's not really used in Quebec and regarding the Latin American community here the positive views are not even primarily about the socio-economic dimension.

It's more a question of people's perceptions of their behaviour and their eagerness to fit in.

I should also mention that in Quebec it's not considered shameful or unfortunate or abnormal for a good number of immigrants to be working class. Or for anyone else to be like that, even.

Plenty of French Canadian Québécois people are working class too. No one sees that as a big deal.
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  #10582  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2018, 3:16 AM
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Originally Posted by FrAnKs View Post
J'ai ma déjà petite idée sur les raisons, mais selon toi, quels sont les phénomènes qui peuvent expliquer cela ?
Bonne question...! C'est sûr que côté immigration, on en arrache depuis des décennies et cela a ralenti énormément la croissance de la population. Sinon, difficile à dire mais évidemment que Montréal étant tout près, avec toutes ses opportunités, ça draine pas mal et avec raison. T'en pense quoi?
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  #10583  
Old Posted Jan 4, 2018, 3:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Dirt_Devil View Post
Bonne question...! C'est sûr que côté immigration, on en arrache depuis des décennies et cela a ralenti énormément la croissance de la population. Sinon, difficile à dire mais évidemment que Montréal étant tout près, avec toutes ses opportunités, ça draine pas mal et avec raison. T'en pense quoi?
Québec est aussi beaucoup plus vieille que Montréal, la moyenne d'âge est plus élevée, il y a moins de jeune probablement, donc moins de naissances. mais c'est une hypothèse.

Les villes du Centre-du-Québec grossissent rapidement, la migration interrégionale y est pour quelque chose. La région de la Capitale-Nationale attire moins de gens qu'avant. Plus de 2x moins qu'en 2001.
http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/statistiq...igir_solde.htm

Quote:
''Depuis sept ans, c’est dans le Centre-du-Québec que les gains sont proportionnellement les plus importants (0,38 % en 2015-2016).''
Dans le sud du Québec, la Capitale-Nationale a le 3e plus bas taux de migration, après Montréal et Laval.

Quote:
''Soulignons par ailleurs que les soldes de la région sont déficitaires pour la première fois depuis 1998-1999 avec le Centre-du-Québec et la Mauricie, et au plus bas niveau jamais atteint, quoiqu’encore positif, avec l’Estrie et le Bas-Saint-Laurent.''
http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/statistiq...doeil-no50.pdf

D'après moi le trafic de la région de Québec et le manque de TEC nuit à la ville au long terme.

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Pour la Montérégie , Le bilan favorable de la Montérégie repose presque exclusivement sur ses échanges avec Montréal (gain net de 7 350 personnes), tandis que ses principales pertes sont avec l’Estrie (– 500) et le Centre-du-Québec (– 450).
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Last edited by GreaterMontréal; Jan 4, 2018 at 4:00 AM.
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  #10584  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2018, 4:02 PM
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Another strong jobs report for December (albeit tilted toward part-time jobs), with Quebec and Alberta out front for the month.

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quoti...-eng.htm?HPA=1
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  #10585  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2018, 4:06 PM
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Originally Posted by kwoldtimer View Post
Another strong jobs report for December (albeit tilted toward part-time jobs), with Quebec and Alberta out front for the month.

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quoti...-eng.htm?HPA=1
Unfortunately the major drivers of that growth in Alberta was accommodation and food service industries. Not exactly setting the world on fire with that kind of innovation.
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  #10586  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2018, 4:16 PM
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Originally Posted by geotag277 View Post
Unfortunately the major drivers of that growth in Alberta was accommodation and food service industries. Not exactly setting the world on fire with that kind of innovation.
Although nationally, 394,000 full time jobs for the year is amazing.
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  #10587  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2018, 2:48 AM
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4.9% unemployment in Quebec!
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  #10588  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2018, 3:01 AM
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Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
4.9% unemployment in Quebec!
And still, it seems, surprisingly little upward pressure on wages.
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  #10589  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2018, 3:27 AM
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Originally Posted by kwoldtimer View Post
And still, it seems, surprisingly little upward pressure on wages.
Quebec is expected to record the largest wage increases in 2018 in Canada, according to an annual survey of Morneau Shepell unveiled Wednesday.

2.6% in 2018
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  #10590  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2018, 3:32 AM
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Originally Posted by GreaterMontréal View Post
Quebec is expected to record the largest wage increases in 2018 in Canada, according to an annual survey of Morneau Shepell unveiled Wednesday.

2.6% in 2017
2.6% in 2018
That's better than the expected rate of inflation, but doesn't really seem to reflect what one would see if employers were starting to experience labour shortages. I could be wrong, but I think that wages in Ontario, in particular, have been showing very weak growth despite the upturn in the economy.
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  #10591  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2018, 3:42 AM
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Here's an interesting stats can table I keep my eye on:

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tabl...bor93a-eng.htm

You can slice and dice by province (just have to select "Industrial aggregate excluding unclassified businesses" to see provincial data).

It looks like average weekly earnings in Quebec just passed $900 for the first time in August 2017 since they started collecting data (Jan 2001), so there is some evidence wages are being pushed up given the economy.
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  #10592  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2018, 11:26 AM
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I came across something that I thought was a little interesting today dubbed the "Lithwick Report" (1970) written by Norman Harvey Lithwick. It is basically a run down of the problems and future of urban areas in Canada looking forward to 2001. It includes population projections looking forward from 2001 from 1971. From 1951 to 1971 Canada's population grew from 14 million to 22 million and Lithwick was predicting that this astounding growth would more or less continue in the country's main urban areas up to the 21st century. Of course the baby boom didn't last but it sure would be interesting to see what Canada would be like had his estimates come true, the only city that grew as predicted was Calgary.

1. Toronto 6,510,000
2. Montreal 6,374,000
3. Vancouver 2,482,000
4. Ottawa 1,616,000
5. Winnipeg 1,614,000
6. Edmonton 1,223,000
7. Hamilton 1,201,000
8. Quebec City 1,178,000
9. Calgary 937,000
10. London 674,000
11. Windsor 577,000
12. Regina 438,000

Unfortunately I cannot find the full version online, however the above figures are available in the google book snippet "Canada on the Threshold of the 21st Century".
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  #10593  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2018, 1:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kwoldtimer View Post
That's better than the expected rate of inflation, but doesn't really seem to reflect what one would see if employers were starting to experience labour shortages. I could be wrong, but I think that wages in Ontario, in particular, have been showing very weak growth despite the upturn in the economy.
Alberta excluded, Canadian wages significantly lag American. Even if we see strong wage growth for 2-3 years it won't close the gap much. We'll need continued strong gains for 10-15 years to pull even.
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  #10594  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2018, 2:35 PM
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Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
Alberta excluded, Canadian wages significantly lag American. Even if we see strong wage growth for 2-3 years it won't close the gap much. We'll need continued strong gains for 10-15 years to pull even.
Given their even lower rates of unemployment, I would have expected even more pressure on wages in the U.S. If anything, the gap between the two countries might increase, no?
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  #10595  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2018, 6:35 AM
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Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
Alberta excluded, Canadian wages significantly lag American. Even if we see strong wage growth for 2-3 years it won't close the gap much. We'll need continued strong gains for 10-15 years to pull even.
As long as we have higher taxes, we will NEVER be able to compete with the US.

Walmart says it’s raising wages thanks to the GOP tax plan

Quote:
Walmart employees are getting a pay bump, and the company says it’s courtesy of the corporate tax cut Republicans rushed through Congress last year. That’s good P.R. — but probably only part of the story.

The retail giant announced Thursday that it is raising the minimum wage for hourly associates to $11, and handing out bonuses of up to $1,000 to employees. The company also said it would introduce more generous paid family leave policies, and offer an adoption benefit.

Walmart credits the Republican tax plan for its decision to hike wages and offer bonuses. “We are early in the stages of assessing the opportunities tax reform creates for us to invest in our customers and associates and to further strengthen our business, all of which should benefit our shareholders,” Walmart CEO and president Doug McMillon said in a statement, which cited lower prices for customers and better wages as among the company’s goals.

Walmart isn’t the first company to shower a nice public thank you on the GOP tax plan. Boeing, AT&T, Wells Fargo, and Comcast have all said they were either investing more in the US or offering perks to employees, from bonuses to minimum wage boosts to other investments in employee development. Capital One announced Thursday it’s increasing its minimum hourly wage to $15.
https://www.vox.com/2018/1/11/168796...lican-tax-plan
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  #10596  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2018, 7:20 AM
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but Walmart is also closing 63 Sam's Club stores (employees at these stores make more than a walmart store employee does)

Walmart raises minimum wage to $11 an hour, but closes 63 Sam's Club stores

http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/walmart-taxes-1.4482419
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  #10597  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2018, 1:35 PM
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Finally found the complete census for Newfoundland and Labrador in 1874. The closest Canadian one to compare it with is 1871.

At that time, the largest cities in Canada were:

1. Montreal - 107,225
2. Quebec - 59,699
3. Toronto - 56,092
4. Halifax - 29,582
5. Saint John, NB - 28,805
6. Hamilton - 26,716
7. Ottawa - 21,545
8. London - 15,826
9. Portland, NB - 12,520
10. Kingston - 12,407

In the 1874 census, St. John's was counted in four parts. St. John's East (City Only), St. John's East District, St. John's West (City Only), and St. John's West District. The districts include, of course, the core city portions. Their boundaries were smaller than the current CMA.

The population for the city only was: 23,890.
The population for the districts was: 30,574.

So it would've been either the fourth or seventh largest if part of Canada at that time.

Also, talk about lack of diversity...

Birthplaces of St. John's residents at that time:

Newfoundland: 89.6%
Ireland: 6.6%
England: 2.0%
Scotland: 0.008%
Other British Dominions and Colonies: 0.007%
Foreign Countries: 0.003%
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Last edited by SignalHillHiker; Jan 14, 2018 at 3:28 PM.
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  #10598  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2018, 2:47 PM
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IIRC Portland NB was just a burb of Saint John NB.
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  #10599  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2018, 3:25 PM
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You're right - but it was counted separately in 1871, it seems. The Notes section says "Portland was a city until 1889 when it amalgamated with Saint John, New Brunswick".
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  #10600  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2018, 4:41 PM
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Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
You're right - but it was counted separately in 1871, it seems. The Notes section says "Portland was a city until 1889 when it amalgamated with Saint John, New Brunswick".
So in 1871, Saint John was the fourth largest city in the Dominion.

Oh how the mighty have fallen..........
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