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  #61  
Old Posted Dec 2, 2017, 4:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Steel City Scotty View Post
Another NEXTpittsburgh article about another new development, though this one is a renovation project rather than new construction.

That is fantastic news, I've always thought that building could be incredible restored to its original glory, as of now it looks like a run down dump.
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  #62  
Old Posted Dec 3, 2017, 10:18 PM
BenM BenM is offline
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Originally Posted by Steel City Scotty View Post
Another NEXTpittsburgh article about another new development, though this one is a renovation project rather than new construction.

It looks like the developer is also ready to get started on the Produce Terminal renovation as well. Hopefully, that stretch of Smallman will look very different in the near future.
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  #63  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2017, 11:15 AM
TBone7281 TBone7281 is offline
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It looks like the developer is also ready to get started on the Produce Terminal renovation as well. Hopefully, that stretch of Smallman will look very different in the near future.
Some of the back loading areas of the PT were open last week. It looked to me like maybe they were clearing out of some of the vacant spaces to prepare for something a little more substantial, development-wise. But there was no one around so maybe I was just being hopeful.
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  #64  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2017, 1:28 PM
BrianTH BrianTH is offline
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P-G article on the Crosstown cap park:

http://www.post-gazette.com/business...s/201712040015



This is pretty cool:

Quote:
The end of the park closest to PPG Paints Arena will feature walls relating the history of the Hill. One, representing the 19th century, will focus on Martin Delany, a Civil War major who was an abolitionist, educator, journalist, doctor and entrepreneur.

Another, representing the 20th century, will highlight Frankie Mae Pace, a longtime Hill activist and businesswoman who protested the 1950s urban renewal that displaced many Hill residents and cut off access to Downtown with construction of the Civic Arena.
. . .

Helping visitors to navigate the park will be “Keisha,” an image of young African-American girl who will be seen at various points waving, listening to music, dancing, reading a book, and stargazing. The images will include text explaining the symbolism of park design elements.
Glad to see Keisha is still involved.

I take it this is a possible use for the out parcel:

Quote:
There also will be room for a cafe or restaurant and restrooms in future phases.
That would be nice.

Generally it is probably worth remembering that design details aside, a big part of the value here is just blocking out the noise, sight, smell, etc. of the highway. It is going to feel pretty different transitioning from Downtown to the Lower Hill.
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  #65  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2017, 3:00 PM
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And a big thing holding the Hill back from redevelopment is the mental barrier that the highway represents.
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  #66  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2017, 3:54 PM
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^
And a big thing holding the Hill back from redevelopment is the mental barrier that the highway represents.
It will certainly help make the Civic Arena site more marketable, but the Lower Hill proper (Crawford Roberts) is already mostly redeveloped with infill, except for some areas closer to Uptown.

Of course, it was redeveloped in a way too low density manner, but given it wasn't market-rate, and the neighborhood wasn't desirable at the time, it's not surprising.
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  #67  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2017, 4:52 PM
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Pitt is buying 3441 Forbes Avenue (the Health Department building) from Allegheny County.

Not much on the details of what Pitt wants to use the building for, other than part of an "innovation district." I hope it's not knocked down - it's a beautiful old building, and would be even nicer if it were restored - but if it's replaced by something of greater density I wouldn't be that upset. Pitt owns the one-story 3447 Forbes next door, and immediately on the other side The Bridge on Forbes (the new 197-unit apartment building) will be constructed. Also, that new office project at the corner of Forbes and Coltart is directly catty-corner. So another office building wouldn't be out of scale here.
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  #68  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2017, 6:04 PM
themaguffin themaguffin is offline
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Forty-six townhouses proposed near Strip District produce terminal

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Laurel Communities proposes to build 46 townhouses along the new Waterfront Place built through Buncher’s site. The new three-story homes will line the street, extending an entire block and the length of the Pennsylvania Fruit Auction & Sales produce terminal.
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  #69  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2017, 7:22 PM
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Sorry to be posting this long email I just got but anyone who can should attend the meeting, I cant because of work but Ill be emailing the people in the email about preserving the two buildings they are idiotically thinking about tearing down.

Quote:
As you may know, a large new development is in the works in partnership with the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, Pittsburgh Parking Authority, and The Davis Company on land that spans Penn Avenue to Ft. Duquesne Blvd. (between 8th and 9th Streets). Much of the land is surface parking/parking garage. However, the new development includes the corner of Penn & 9th Street in the City designated Penn-Liberty Historic District and thus the partners are seeking permission from the Historic Review Commission (HRC) to demolish three buildings in the Historic District (819, 821 Penn Ave are two circa 1910 buildings contributing to the District while the third building, 823 Penn Avenue, does not contribute). The proposed demolition was discussed at the November HRC meeting and will likely be voted on this week at the Wednesday, December 6th HRC meeting. The link to December’s HRC meeting agenda and applicants’ materials is below:

http://apps.pittsburghpa.gov/redtail...017-Agenda.pdf

Also, here is a link to a Post-Gazette article from this summer:

http://www.post-gazette.com/business...s/201707200143

Preservation Pittsburgh believes that it is the HRC’s role to protect buildings that have gone through the long and thorough process to become city landmarks. The two contributing landmark buildings with historic character could be incorporated into the new development. Preservation Pittsburgh has made contact with the partners and has attended a meeting with The Davis Company. We will also attend this week’s HRC meeting.

It’s important to note that just a few blocks down at the corner of Penn Avenue and 7th Street a different approach is being taken. Rather than demolition, two existing buildings at 711 and 713 Penn Avenue (McNally and Bonn Buildings) -- previously owned by the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust -- will be incorporated into Trek Development's new residential and retail development. http://trekdevelopment.com/whats-new/

The HRC’s December 6 monthly meeting begins at 1 pm, but the demolition approval request falls later on the agenda (probably around 2:45 pm). Public comment will be heard and public support is taken into consideration (comments are limited to 3 minutes). Also at the very end of the HRC agenda will be the discussion of Roslyn Place Historic District and Sheridan Homestead that Preservation Pittsburgh recently nominated in cooperation with property owners!


Note: if you are not able to attend the HRC meeting but wish to make a comment, you may send a letter or email to the HRC (Attn: Sarah Quinn) with your public comment: 200 Ross Street, Third Floor, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 or email sarah.quinn@pittsburghpa.gov

Given the pace of development in our city, some of which impacts our historic resources, it’s important that the public has a say in how our communities grow and develop. One way to have a say is through the protection of our historic structures that had a vibrant past with potential for an equally vibrant future.
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  #70  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2017, 7:45 PM
BrianTH BrianTH is offline
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I sent an email to the HRC. Definitely worth doing at least that much.
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  #71  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2017, 8:33 PM
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I sent an email to the HRC. Definitely worth doing at least that much.
I don't know what happened at the last meeting, but I can't see how the demolition would even be in question any longer. The developer has submitted a plan to save the facades. Carol Peterson is on the board, and she is a vehement preservationist (to the point she's preserved a historic outhouse on her own property. Matthew Falcone is the president of Preservation Pittsburgh. There are nominally six people with voting power at the HRC, but only 4-5 show up at any given meeting, so all the preservationists would need was one more vote. Ray Gastil and Erik Harless are both city employees, and thus presumably responsive to public pressure.
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  #72  
Old Posted Dec 5, 2017, 3:01 PM
Gilamonster Gilamonster is offline
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The foundation and podium permit for 1 of the 2 Station Square apartment buildings was finally issued Nov.17 and on my trolley ride to work this morning, I could see that work was beginning.

Edit: As I look at the site from across the river, it appears the heavy equipment is actually being used for a CSX rail project.
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Last edited by Gilamonster; Dec 5, 2017 at 3:41 PM.
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  #73  
Old Posted Dec 5, 2017, 3:44 PM
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  #74  
Old Posted Dec 5, 2017, 6:26 PM
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A bit too much like an advertisement for me, but Next Pittsburgh has a feature on a set of three "passive homes" soon to be built on the 900 block of Mellon Street (here)



The design is garbage generic modernism, IMHO, but I wouldn't expect anything different from Pittsburgh infill.
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  #75  
Old Posted Dec 5, 2017, 6:35 PM
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^
Ewwwwww
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  #76  
Old Posted Dec 5, 2017, 6:50 PM
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^
Ewwwwww
That block in general is a big disappointment to me. It used to be a semi-mixed use area, with several storefronts on the western side of the street. Over the last two years two of these abandoned storefronts have been converted into single-family homes. The only remaining business is a dog grooming place. And of course the big vacant lot, which could have housed a small apartment building, will be more rich people housing. I still hope that the one remaining vacant storefront will eventually house a coffeeshop or neighborhood market (or maybe nearby Costar Brewing could take it over), but what was the largest potential cluster of shops between Bryant Street and Penn/Highland will just be another quiet, residential, pseudo-suburban streetscape.
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  #77  
Old Posted Dec 6, 2017, 1:29 PM
Minivan Werner Minivan Werner is offline
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Does anyone actually live in that brutalist duplex on the left? It looks more like something you'd see in Moldova.
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  #78  
Old Posted Dec 6, 2017, 2:25 PM
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Does anyone actually live in that brutalist duplex on the left? It looks more like something you'd see in Moldova.
That's actually a three-unit, according to the assessor's site. It's owned by the Highland Park Community Development Corporation, so my guess is it's vacant. It was built some time between 1900 and 1910 judging by the historic maps, so it must have just been horrendously remuddled at some point, not intended to be brutalist.
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  #79  
Old Posted Dec 6, 2017, 2:58 PM
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Eyeball report: looks like the Larimer development phase across from the Target is moving along well--there are cranes and structures going up. That is really going to transform that stretch of Broad and further expand the "East Liberty" footprint.
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  #80  
Old Posted Dec 6, 2017, 3:13 PM
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More information about Walnut Capital's purchase of the Pittsburgh Athletic Association's clubhouse in Oakland
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