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  #1701  
Old Posted Jul 7, 2018, 7:56 PM
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Great Atlanta shot. The lightning is almost overshadowed by everything else going on.
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  #1702  
Old Posted Jul 7, 2018, 10:17 PM
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Tucumán, Argentina





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  #1703  
Old Posted Jul 17, 2018, 9:43 PM
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Traverse City, MI

According to local legend when the area was first settled by Euro-Americans the old growth White Pine forest was so dominate that one could ride a stage coach through the gaps in-between the huge trees. Sadly there are only two stands of old growth forest in the Lower Peninsula left, Heartwick Pines & South Manitou Island although a lot of the protected 2nd gen forest is around 100 years or more now allowing a better glimpse of what the area used to look like.


http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article...e-city-economy
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  #1704  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2018, 1:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris08876 View Post
That's why we say skyline is all about angles.

Bufallo looks indeed dense from that angle above, but why most of Buffalo skyline photos look so infamously scattered.
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  #1705  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2018, 6:43 AM
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holy crap it just blows the shit out of my mind that is mexico city what the wow I got nothing to say but keep mouth oepn wide
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  #1706  
Old Posted Jul 20, 2018, 12:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Phil McAvity View Post
I always knew Melbourne had a great skyline but this pic makes me think it's one of the best on earth.
You can't be serious. Melbourne's skyline should be alright, but with such scattered layout people are definitely unable to catch a decent skyline.

To help understand better, my best-on-Earth skyline is Chicago's.
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  #1707  
Old Posted Jul 22, 2018, 9:23 PM
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American cities, and to an extent, Canadian ones, have a certain organizational structure to them that other other big cities just don't have. Ours tend to be neatly defined and confined and rarely sprawl out. One thing I've noticed about foreign cities is they don't think anything about placing high rise districts in multiple locations in the city. I guess it's partly because those cities are older with more historic structures, and so it's harder to build density without knocking down history. So, they build it where ever they can when the opportunity comes.
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  #1708  
Old Posted Jul 23, 2018, 4:33 PM
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Originally Posted by KevinFromTexas View Post
American cities, and to an extent, Canadian ones, have a certain organizational structure to them that other other big cities just don't have. Ours tend to be neatly defined and confined and rarely sprawl out. One thing I've noticed about foreign cities is they don't think anything about placing high rise districts in multiple locations in the city. I guess it's partly because those cities are older with more historic structures, and so it's harder to build density without knocking down history. So, they build it where ever they can when the opportunity comes.
???? I've never heard anyone say that US cities rarely sprawl out before.
I'd agree with this for several Canadian cities--Calgary comes to my mind, along with Vancouver.
I do agree that US cities have a unique organizational structure, given their traditionally limited amount of residential development many of our central business districts. But this is definitely changing (Austin is an excellent example given the sheer number of residential high-rises being built downtown).
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  #1709  
Old Posted Jul 23, 2018, 7:41 PM
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Originally Posted by MplsTodd View Post
???? I've never heard anyone say that US cities rarely sprawl out before.
I'd agree with this for several Canadian cities--Calgary comes to my mind, along with Vancouver.
I do agree that US cities have a unique organizational structure, given their traditionally limited amount of residential development many of our central business districts. But this is definitely changing (Austin is an excellent example given the sheer number of residential high-rises being built downtown).
Kevin meant that our urban cores don’t sprawl. Here, everything is very centralized and our high rise districts are synonymous with “urban core” because we don’t put high rises anywhere else except smack dab in the middle of the city. In Europe and elsewhere, urban cores are expansive and sprawl with multiple nodes of high rises on the periphery of that core and miscellaneous sporadic high rises throughout the rest of that core.
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  #1710  
Old Posted Jul 23, 2018, 11:59 PM
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I found a good aerial video over Houston!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=BMEv4fB2IB0
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  #1711  
Old Posted Jul 24, 2018, 2:00 AM
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Originally Posted by wwmiv View Post
Kevin meant that our urban cores don’t sprawl. Here, everything is very centralized and our high rise districts are synonymous with “urban core” because we don’t put high rises anywhere else except smack dab in the middle of the city. In Europe and elsewhere, urban cores are expansive and sprawl with multiple nodes of high rises on the periphery of that core and miscellaneous sporadic high rises throughout the rest of that core.
Got it, thanks!
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  #1712  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2018, 6:11 AM
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Originally Posted by KevinFromTexas View Post
This photo is from 2015, so it's a bit dated, but this is sort of a rare view of the skyline. It's looking over Mopac Expressway east toward downtown. That's Austin High School in the foreground.


https://www.flickr.com/photos/crimin...52291/sizes/k/
Yea that's right it is dated because Austin is developing.

But if you take photos of Tulsa, there won't be any difference from 1995 to 2015.
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  #1713  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2018, 3:52 AM
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Wow...downtown Austin looks so much different now compared to 2015.
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  #1714  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2018, 4:46 AM
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The reason cities in other countries don't tend to have a central business district is because it makes no sense in most of the rest of the world.

Bear in mind that most cities on earth are far more densely populated than what you'll find in North America (north of Mexico, anyway) That means travel times are much harder to keep short. So why put everything in one place in the middle when you can spread it out? Who wants to spend hours traveling to work? Nobody on earth does and only in the US, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand is that model the standard. If anything, they'll build nodes but a central core is more or less out of the question.

If you go to a place like China, you might get somewhere like Pudong in Shanghai or Beijing's CBD but those are just the jewels in the crown rather than the only centers of commerce. Not that it really makes any difference since the entire city is high rises anyway. About the only way you're going to be able to distinguish any building is if it's really tall or set in an expansive layout.
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  #1715  
Old Posted Aug 11, 2018, 5:30 PM
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  #1716  
Old Posted Aug 11, 2018, 6:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spocket View Post
The reason cities in other countries don't tend to have a central business district is because it makes no sense in most of the rest of the world.

Bear in mind that most cities on earth are far more densely populated than what you'll find in North America (north of Mexico, anyway) That means travel times are much harder to keep short. So why put everything in one place in the middle when you can spread it out? Who wants to spend hours traveling to work? Nobody on earth does and only in the US, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand is that model the standard. If anything, they'll build nodes but a central core is more or less out of the question.

If you go to a place like China, you might get somewhere like Pudong in Shanghai or Beijing's CBD but those are just the jewels in the crown rather than the only centers of commerce. Not that it really makes any difference since the entire city is high rises anyway. About the only way you're going to be able to distinguish any building is if it's really tall or set in an expansive layout.
It’s a bit more nuanced than this, really. Cities in the US also, for the most part, really came into being during industrialization. They developed quickly, and with railroads, which encouraged centralization as lines were built to outward from the center to bedroom suburbs. And these cities were often surrounded by absolutely fuck all - there was a small city, and then there was wilderness.

In Europe, the cities were much larger before industrialization. There were limits on how tall you could practically build, before elevators, and so cities spread outwards. They were de-centralized because most people got around on foot. In London and Paris, among other examples, the (several) main train stations are in a ring on the fringes of what would be considered the central area - which was already too fully developed to be running new surface rail lines into by the time of the steam engine. And as these cities grew, they also absorbed existing towns and villages, many of which were hundreds of years old, and then formed hubs within the metropolis.

A handful of the oldest cities in America (like the New York metro area) are actually more multi-polar, as well (Manhattan is much more than a CBD). The newest American cities (mostly in the West) are also less centralized, because they developed in a post-railroad world. But it’s really trains that made the New World cities of the 19th century so incredibly centralized.
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  #1717  
Old Posted Aug 12, 2018, 9:50 PM
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Originally Posted by MplsTodd View Post
???? I've never heard anyone say that US cities rarely sprawl out before.
I'd agree with this for several Canadian cities--Calgary comes to my mind, along with Vancouver.
I do agree that US cities have a unique organizational structure, given their traditionally limited amount of residential development many of our central business districts. But this is definitely changing (Austin is an excellent example given the sheer number of residential high-rises being built downtown).
I was talking about downtowns. I know American cities sprawl. I was talking about their central business districts being pretty well defined and that you rarely have secondary defined commercial districts outside of downtown.

European cities seem to get their density where ever they can, even if it means having one or more high rises spread outside of what is universally accepted as their central business district. It's partially because of the consequence of them wanting to retain their old buildings, and so developable land rarely becomes available unless something happens like a fire. Paris and London are good examples where they have high rises spread out.

This trend in America is only just now starting to come to and end where cities are starting to see the benefit of having more than one centralized urban core. Even Austin is starting to, and it's something I never would have imagined would happen 20 years ago. The idea that we might soon have 400 foot buildings outside of downtown (8 miles north of it) would have been unthinkable until recently.

Of course, some US cities were already doing that. Dallas, and especially Houston have had large commercial districts outside of their downtowns for decades while people said they were crazy. The funny thing is, always sort of thought it was smart and reminded me more of a European philosophy of "get density where you can."
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  #1718  
Old Posted Aug 13, 2018, 3:19 AM
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Originally Posted by KevinFromTexas View Post
I was talking about downtowns. I know American cities sprawl. I was talking about their central business districts being pretty well defined and that you rarely have secondary defined commercial districts outside of downtown.

European cities seem to get their density where ever they can, even if it means having one or more high rises spread outside of what is universally accepted as their central business district. It's partially because of the consequence of them wanting to retain their old buildings, and so developable land rarely becomes available unless something happens like a fire. Paris and London are good examples where they have high rises spread out.

This trend in America is only just now starting to come to and end where cities are starting to see the benefit of having more than one centralized urban core. Even Austin is starting to, and it's something I never would have imagined would happen 20 years ago. The idea that we might soon have 400 foot buildings outside of downtown (8 miles north of it) would have been unthinkable until recently.

Of course, some US cities were already doing that. Dallas, and especially Houston have had large commercial districts outside of their downtowns for decades while people said they were crazy. The funny thing is, always sort of thought it was smart and reminded me more of a European philosophy of "get density where you can."
I really haven't heard anyone in Dallas or Houston say that all the large, high rise districts outside of downtown were crazy. It's part of the essential character of those cities. What's crazy is that Austin is just now barely doing that, even as the city proper is at almost 1 million.
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  #1719  
Old Posted Aug 13, 2018, 4:11 AM
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I really haven't heard anyone in Dallas or Houston say that all the large, high rise districts outside of downtown were crazy. It's part of the essential character of those cities. What's crazy is that Austin is just now barely doing that, even as the city proper is at almost 1 million.
I meant people outside of Texas who especially thought Houston was off its rocker for not having zoning laws, but some people are coming around to the idea now since neighborhoods are naturally "upzoning" without government involvement. I'm still kind of on the fence about it because sometimes people have poor taste and think round holes are great for square pegs or that one size fits all.
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  #1720  
Old Posted Aug 16, 2018, 3:04 AM
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