HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > Supertall Construction

    

45 Broad Street in the SkyscraperPage Database

Building Data Page   • Comparison Diagram   • New York Skyscraper Diagram
New York Projects & Construction Forum
            
View Full Map

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #341  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2018, 6:03 AM
Star Scream Star Scream is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 5
The quality and sheen of the bronze will determine whether this building is a hit or a flop.. I’m hoping for the former
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #342  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2018, 6:07 AM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 37,470
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/22/n...e=sectionfront

In New Proposed Subway Elevators, Some See a Terrorism Risk



Claudia Ward with her daughter, Cleo Allan, in front of 15 Broad Street in Lower Manhattan, where they live. Ms. Ward opposes a plan to build glass elevators to provide access to a subway station, arguing that they could become a terror target.




A group of supporters of the proposed elevators include the developer who is building the elevators and advocates for the disabled. From left to right, Michael J. Schweinsburg, Mathew Klein, Edith M. Prentis, Robert Gladstone, Ivan Alevante and Christopher D. Gieif.


By SARAH MASLIN NIR
JAN. 22, 2018

Quote:
To some, the prospect of adding new subway elevators not far from the World Trade Center is a godsend, a desperately needed portal for the disabled to a subway system that is among the least accessible in the nation.

To a group of neighbors who live beside the proposed site, the elevators seem like something else entirely: a hazard a terrorist could turn into shrapnel.

On one side of a growing skirmish on Broad Street in Lower Manhattan are disabled riders, advocates and a real estate developer building the elevators in exchange for being granted permission by the city to add more square footage to the mixed-use building the developer is erecting at 45 Broad Street.

On the other are tenants of nearby buildings like 15 Broad Street, a high-rise designed by the architect Philippe Starck. It is a pocket of the city that has long been under intense security because of its proximity to prime potential targets like the New York Stock Exchange, and critics say the elevators could pose a threat in an area where police and bomb-sniffing dogs routinely check vehicles driving through.

“The idea that people can then ride in on the subway with a bomb or whatever and come straight up in an elevator is awful to me,” said Claudia Ward, who lives in 15 Broad Street and was among a group of neighbors who denounced the plan at a recent meeting of the local community board. “It’s too easy for someone to slip through. And I just don’t want my family and my neighbors to be the collateral on that.”

Residents of 15 Broad Street hired an independent security analyst who determined the glass and metal elevators could pose a security risk.

“We are hypersensitive to the security,” said Linda Gerstman, the vice president of the 15 Broad Street board of directors. “We live it every day.”

Neighbors first raised security concerns late last year after the developer, Madison Equities, sought to take advantage of New York City zoning rules that offers an incentive to real estate developers: the right to enlarge their project in exchange for improvements to the subway station closest to the site. The two elevators will cost about $20 million total and provide access to both ends of the platforms of the J and Z line at the Broad Street station. In exchange, the 80-story office building rising at 45 Broad Street, will include an additional 71,000 square feet.

The elevator project, now in the public comment stage, is facing heavy resistance from residents who say it will put them at risk. The controversy over the elevators was reported by The TriBeCa Tribune.

The fight over the elevators is for some riders who are disabled or who have a hard time negotiating stairs, a painful reminder of the ways in which the city’s subway system already fails them. Fewer than one out of every five New York City subway stations is wheelchair accessible, far behind other cities like Chicago and Boston where about 70 percent of stations are compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act, which mandates accessible public spaces. The failure has made the subway the target of two class action lawsuits filed last year.

On the J and Z line trains, in particular, only five of the total 30 stations provide wheelchair access and only one of those is in Manhattan, at Fulton Street, according to data compiled by the Riders Alliance, an advocacy group.

The type of public-private agreements like the one into which Madison Equities and the city have entered, many advocates say, is among the swiftest and most financially viable ways to rectify the problem of access.

Edith Prentiss, who relies on a wheelchair to get around, believes the pearl-clutching over security is disingenuous and is really simply an excuse by opponents to keep the elevators from their upscale block. (A one-bedroom apartment at 15 Broad is currently on the market for over $2 million.)

“It’s total NIMBY,” said Ms. Prentiss, who is also the president of Disabled In Action, an advocacy organization. “It’s ‘Don’t affect my property values, don’t affect my — I love this — my iconic view.’ I can understand that they paid a lot of money, I’m sure, but that does not abrogate my civil rights.”


The dispute led to a heated meeting recently of Community Board 1’s land use, zoning and economic development committee. In a room packed with wheelchair users and residents, tenants of 15 and 30 Broad Street submitted a petition with 270 signatures opposing the elevators. Beyond security, critics said that the particular J and Z stop is little used and argued that elevators would be better employed at a busier stop.

Robert Gladstone, the owner of Madison Equities, called the pushback a “disgrace.” “I am offended by the notion that they don’t serve anybody and don’t do anything,” he said referring to the elevators. “It is an incredible statement to make.”

In late December, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which oversees the subway, sent inspectors to the site who concluded that the elevators did not pose an extra risk. “Expanding accessibility to the subway system is an essential priority of New York City Transit and these elevators help us further that mission,” said Jon Weinstein, a spokesman for the authority.


The New York Police Department has also indicated it does not consider the elevators a concern. “The N.Y.P.D. agrees with the M.T.A.’s proposal to have elevator access at the location,” Sgt. Jessica McRorie, a police spokeswoman, said. “We do not see the structure as a security risk.”

The proposal was unanimously approved by the community board’s land use committee. It will go before the entire board on Tuesday.

Local residents plan to continue to fight, said Ms. Gerstman, noting that her building’s board decided against putting decorative planters at the building’s entrance over fears that shards could injure people in the event of a blast.

“Knowing that, and then seeing the proposal for giant glass structures in front of my building — ding ding ding! — what does a giant glass structure become in the event of an explosion?” she said.

Trading access for safety is unacceptable to people like Christi Gehrisch, the chief operating officer of the Cerebral Palsy Foundation. “When the bomb went off in the subway last month people said, ‘I am going back tomorrow!’” Ms. Gehrisch said, referring to the failed suicide bombing attempt in a subway tunnel near Times Square in December. “For someone to use terrorism as an excuse not to provide access to people is a huge stretch.”

“Frankly,’’ she added, “I find it insulting.”

For once, the comments section is getting it right.


It most likely will get approved anyway, though even if it didn't, it wouldn't affect the overall height or look of the building.


__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #343  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2018, 4:47 PM
jsbrook jsbrook is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 2,646
Claudia Ward is a moron. Scrapping the elevators doesn't eliminate or substantially reduce the risks of a terrorist attack. Given that, these people should not be allowed to harm the interests of the handicapped.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #344  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2018, 4:56 PM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 37,470
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsbrook View Post
Claudia Ward is a moron. Scrapping the elevators doesn't eliminate or substantially reduce the risks of a terrorist attack. Given that, these people should not be allowed to harm the interests of the handicapped.
Yeah, it's one of the most ridiculous NIMBY arguments yet.
__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #345  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2018, 1:47 AM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 37,470
News story on the NIMBYs and those in favor.


http://www.ny1.com/nyc/manhattan/new...e-clear-target
__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #346  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2018, 2:12 AM
chris08876's Avatar
chris08876 chris08876 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: New Jersey - Somerset County
Posts: 23,365
Why not just add some screening devices pre-elevator entry?

After all, its security they are concerned with... which has nothing to do with 45 Broad rising.

Security and parks and schools tend to be issues the minute something is over 200 ft. I'm just saying...

Coincidence? Possibly. NIMBYS being NIMBYS... yes!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #347  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2018, 4:45 AM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 37,470
It's just baloney. In all of New York City, the terrorist are coming to get them. Why them when there are millions of people around the city, softer targets.
__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #348  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2018, 12:14 AM
Zerton's Avatar
Zerton Zerton is offline
Ω
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Chicago
Posts: 4,074
Wow - disturbing. It's really crazy that these people would block disabled people access because of some imaginary threat to their property values. And the terrorism angle is a really low blow.
__________________
If all others accepted the lie which the Party imposed, if all records told the same tale, then the lie passed into history and became truth. -Orwell
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #349  
Old Posted Jan 28, 2018, 5:44 AM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 37,470
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zerton View Post
Wow - disturbing. It's really crazy that these people would block disabled people access because of some imaginary threat to their property values. And the terrorism angle is a really low blow.
Maybe the mayor should propose one of those homeless shelters like the one that will open next to One57 nearby.
__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #350  
Old Posted Jan 31, 2018, 4:05 PM
dumbo dumbo is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zerton View Post
Wow - disturbing. It's really crazy that these people would block disabled people access because of some imaginary threat to their property values. And the terrorism angle is a really low blow.
It's pretty horrifying. The handicapped access to the NYC subway system is terribly bad and makes life so difficult for so many. We should be doing everything we can to ensure access at every station.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #351  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2018, 3:20 AM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 37,470
http://tribecatrib.com/content/battl...sabled-win-day

In Battle Over FiDi Subway Elevators, Advocates for Disabled Win the Day



Ivan Alevante was among more than a dozen people who spoke out at this month's full board meeting of Community Board 1 in favor of the installation of elevators at the J/Z line at Broadway and Exchange Place. Rendering shows the proposed elevator bulkhead in front of 30 Broad Street.


By CARL GLASSMAN
Posted Jan. 25, 2018


Quote:
Rights activists for the disabled declared victory on Tuesday in their fight for future subway access near the New York Stock Exchange.

Community Board 1 voted to support developer Madison Equities' proposed deal with the city to pay for construction of two subway elevators in exchange for additional floor area for their super-tall tower, set to rise at 45 Broad Street

The elevators would connect to the J/Z lines at Broad and Exchange Place.

The plan pitted the advocates, who called elevator access their "civil rights" against residents of 15 and 30 Broad Street—the two buildings adjacent to the proposed elevators—who said the elevators would provide easy street entry for a terrorist into the “frozen zone” around the New York Stock Exchange.

CB 1’s Land Use, Zoning and Economic Development Committee considered the proposal in December and got an earful from the residents, who had collected some 270 online signatures opposing the elevators. The committee was sympathetic but delayed a vote until MTA and NYPD experts could weigh in on the safety concerns.

In the meantime, the disabled community read the Trib’s account of the meeting and many showed up when the committee reconvened this month. They said the elevators would not only add to the city’s limited number of subway elevators (one wheelchair-bound woman called Lower Manhattan “a bit of an elevator desert”), but also help provide more equal access to employment in the Financial District. And they dismissed the residents fears.

“I shouldn’t have to come to a two-hour board meeting to fight for my civil rights,” said Jennifer Bartlett, one of the disabled activists at the meeting. “The case against terrorism is totally illogical.”

That position got a boost from the MTA, who reported to CB 1 that the elevators “can’t in anyway significantly increase the risk of an incident.”

The NYPD also studied the plan. “Counterterrorism isn’t ignoring or discounting these concerns,” they wrote. “It’s simply that our review focused more narrowly on whether the elevator installation would impact the original security plan [established to prevent car bombs] and they’ve determined that it doesn’t.”

Linda Gertsman, vice president of the 15 Broad Street board of directors, said she was not persuaded. “I'm sorry, any risk of terrorism in front of my building is more than I can handle,” she said. An analysis commissioned by her building concluded that the elevators “unnecessarily present additional security concerns to the area and recommend that an alternate location outside of the Frozen Zone be found.”

But an alternate location apparently is not possible. The consultants on the subway project presented a detailed analysis of the physical limitations to siting the elevators anywhere in the area other than in front of 15 and 30 Broad Street. And according to a zoning law, the developers must make improvements to a subway station adjacent to their building in order to get their special permit from the city.

In the end, the committee voted unanimously “not to oppose” the elevators.

Taking no chances, more than a dozen activists for the disabled showed up at the full board meeting on Tuesday to voice their support for the resolution, and it passed handily. No opponents showed up.

But the proposed elevators did not fully get a pass. Several members decried the look of the structures, saying they were especially wrong for the historic area. Added to the resolution night was a call for the developer and the MTA to come up with something more suitable to the neighborhood. The Landmarks Commission had approved the elevators in 2016.

The City Planning Commission will rule on the developer's application following a 60-day comment period, which ends next month.




Linda Gertsman, left, and Monica Wood of 15 Broad Street present their objections to the installation of an elevator in front of their building. “Our big fear is that someone goes into the big glass box and sets off a bomb,” Wood said. Both women complained that the J/Z line was less used than many others that were without elevators. They were informed that only this station fits within the zoning rules set by the city.





Alex Elegudin, who is paraplegic and president of the advocacy group Wheeling Forward, tells CB 1’s Planning Committee, “I cannot tell you how much time I relay back and forth between broken elevators, how many meetings I’ve missed working as an attorney down here.” In the foreground is Monica Bartley of the Center for Independence of the Disabled New York.”
__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #352  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2018, 7:53 AM
artspook's Avatar
artspook artspook is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: manhattan
Posts: 556
quit dilly-dallying !
this one's halfway decent.
__________________
artSpook
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #353  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2018, 8:07 AM
dropdeaded209's Avatar
dropdeaded209 dropdeaded209 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Berlin
Posts: 255
those people who opposed the elevators should be thrown to the wolves. sick spoiled monsters.
__________________
Director of Starship Chicago and The Absent Column

"Helmut Jahn has never suffered a failure of nerve."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #354  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2018, 6:12 PM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 37,470
Quote:
Originally Posted by dropdeaded209 View Post
those people who opposed the elevators should be thrown to the wolves.
The wolves would probably run.
__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #355  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2018, 8:08 PM
Prezrezc Prezrezc is offline
A.F.K.A. JayPro
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: South Huntington, Long Island, New York
Posts: 685
Let me at the bastages...With just the right maximum velocity and angle of impact, I can use my wheelchair's dominant-sided footrest to snap a fibula like a twig...
...A twig, I say!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #356  
Old Posted Feb 8, 2018, 1:59 AM
sbarn sbarn is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 2,034
Haven't had time to upload a picture, but there is a lot of activity on this site now.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #357  
Old Posted Feb 8, 2018, 2:13 AM
streetscaper streetscaper is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: New York
Posts: 2,377
Quote:
Originally Posted by sbarn View Post
Haven't had time to upload a picture, but there is a lot of activity on this site now.
Awesome news.. can't wait for the pic(s)
__________________
hmmm....
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #358  
Old Posted Feb 8, 2018, 12:49 PM
JMKeynes's Avatar
JMKeynes JMKeynes is offline
In the long run...
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: SW3
Posts: 640
Superb!
__________________
"Men will still say, 'This was their finest hour.'"
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #359  
Old Posted Feb 8, 2018, 4:09 PM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 37,470
Quote:
Originally Posted by sbarn View Post
Haven't had time to upload a picture, but there is a lot of activity on this site now.
Great, another one in motion. I'll be back in town by the weekend, so I'll try to check it out next week.
__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #360  
Old Posted Feb 9, 2018, 2:50 AM
sbarn sbarn is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 2,034
From today:


IMG_3379 by scottbarnholt, on Flickr


IMG_3378 by scottbarnholt, on Flickr

A bit older:

IMG_3317 by scottbarnholt, on Flickr


IMG_3194 by scottbarnholt, on Flickr

All my photos.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > Supertall Construction
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 1:22 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.