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  #1  
Old Posted May 11, 2007, 7:37 AM
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HONG KONG : Historic Preservation

Hong Kong's heritage preservation movement is gaining strength in recent years as major redevelopments take place and the debate over what to do with historic buildings arises. Recently, the movement culminated with protests over how sites of historic value in the central business district can be integrated with the new harbourfront park and highway plan.

Queen's Pier was designated as a historic building this week, but its fate is yet unclear as the government wants to demolish it while land reclamation continues offshore. Previous colonial governors used this pier as their landing point and for ceremonial purposes. Protesters continue to camp at the site urging the government to preserve the structure in the new harbourfront plans.





















































































The 'Red Brick Building' in Yau Ma Tei is over 100 years old and was the first water-pumping station in Kowloon. Today it is preserved and sits next to a huge residential redevelopment project.





Murray House was the colonial army quarters when it was built in 1846. Formerly located where today's Bank of China Tower now stands, it was dismantled in 1982 and re-assembled in Stanley. Today, it houses a museum and restaurants.











This thread will showcase how historic buildings have been given new functions and what urban design and preservation plans are there for existing historic sites that are being redeveloped.
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  #2  
Old Posted May 11, 2007, 4:09 PM
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Historic Buildings in Hong Kong Park





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  #3  
Old Posted May 13, 2007, 6:30 AM
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The Yau Ma Tei Fruit Market is a Grade III historic building. It operates mainly the early morning just after midnight. The government intends to move the wholesale market to another location but there is debate over how to preserve the buildings in a redevelopment scheme.





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Old Posted May 29, 2007, 5:25 PM
MolsonExport MolsonExport is offline
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I know it was ugly, but it is fascinating. I kinda wish the Walled City of Kowloon could have been somehow preserved:
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  #5  
Old Posted May 30, 2007, 1:40 AM
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Great thread, hkskyline.

It's such a shame, really. HK used to have a great stock of colonial-era buildings that have been torn down in the name of progress. Sadly, I'd choose the old GPO over the present-day Worldwide House anyday.
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  #6  
Old Posted Jul 29, 2007, 9:20 AM
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A recent edition of a local travel magazine published an article on historic architecture in Hong Kong :













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  #7  
Old Posted Jul 29, 2007, 9:21 AM
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Wanchai Johnston Road Project
A commercial/residential redevelopment in the heart of Wanchai. Four historical shop-houses (60 - 66, Johnston Road & 18, Ship Street) will be preserved as part of the project.











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Old Posted Aug 1, 2007, 4:24 PM
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Wan Chai Environmental Resource Centre

The building of Wan Chai Environmental Resource Centre was constructed in 1913. It was used as the Wan Chai Post Office from 1915 to 1992 and was declared as a historical building in 1990. It was renovated and became the first Environmental Resource Centre of the Environmental Protection Department in 1993. It is one element of the government's effort in building up an environmentally aware and well-informed community in Hong Kong - an essential first step in developing an improved environmental ethic within the community.







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  #9  
Old Posted Aug 5, 2007, 7:58 PM
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This reminds me of the debate over whether or not technology advance is a positive thing. Some believe 480i is enough, some want 720p and talk down 1080i/p and some like me want the most advanced.

Old building can be preserved if it can serve a new function. However, the new function can probably be better served by a modern building.
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  #10  
Old Posted Sep 2, 2007, 4:47 AM
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Wan Chai Environmental Resource Centre

The building of Wan Chai Environmental Resource Centre was constructed in 1913. It was used as the Wan Chai Post Office from 1915 to 1992 and was declared as a historical building in 1990. It was renovated and became the first Environmental Resource Centre of the Environmental Protection Department in 1993. It is one element of the government's effort in building up an environmentally aware and well-informed community in Hong Kong - an essential first step in developing an improved environmental ethic within the community.







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  #11  
Old Posted Sep 2, 2007, 4:49 AM
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Cattle Depot Artist Village

Former Cattle Depot (Ngau Pang) in Ma Tau Kok, is a place of memory and identity in the district. Being a place for slaughter in the past, it has not been a welcoming spot among the neighbourhood. It is now used by artists as a place for exhibition and art creation. This change of use may have aroused interests in the neighbourhoods.

Description source : http://www.arch.cuhk.edu.hk/serverb/...ang_right.html

































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  #12  
Old Posted Sep 4, 2007, 5:09 AM
kenratboy kenratboy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MolsonExport View Post
I know it was ugly, but it is fascinating. I kinda wish the Walled City of Kowloon could have been somehow preserved:
That is without doubt the most fascinating structure I have ever seen.
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  #13  
Old Posted Nov 13, 2012, 11:53 AM
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Lui Seng Chun Reopens
http://scm.hkbu.edu.hk/lsc/en/index.html

Lui Seng Chun is an old Chinese shophouse (tong lau) originally owned by Mr. Lui Leung, a renowned businessman who moved to Hong Kong from Taishan county in Guangdong province. Designed and built by architect W.H. Bourne, the building was completed in 1931 with a total gross floor area of 600 square metres. Typical of all tong laus at the time, the ground floor of the four-storey building was used as shops while the upper floors were used as dwellings.

Since the 1960s, the Lui family began to move out of the building as the family continued to grow in size. The building became vacant in the 1970s. In 2000, the Antiquities Advisory Board designated Lui Seng Chun a Grade I historic building. With the vision of preserving the building and to contribute to society, the Lui family decided to donate the building to the Government in the same year.

The Lui Seng Chun building was included in Batch I of the "Revitalising Historic Buildings Through Partnership Scheme" initiated by the Government in 2008 and, after a bidding process, Hong Kong Baptist University was selected to conserve the building and convert it into a Chinese medicine healthcare centre. The revitalisation work was completed in early 2012 and the clinic, Hong Kong Baptist University School of Chinese Medicine – Lui Seng Chun, commenced operations in April 2012.

In terms of heritage conservation, every effort was made to retain the original architectural features as far as possible. Necessary alterations and addition works were carried out in compliance with modern buildings and fire regulations as well as meeting the operational needs of the clinic. In the process, the University adhered to the basic principle of minimising the impact of the alterations while ensuring that all alterations could be reversed if necessary.


IMG_0024 by hoho321, on Flickr


IMG_0024 by hoho321, on Flickr


IMG_0024 by hoho321, on Flickr
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  #14  
Old Posted Jul 2, 2018, 6:30 AM
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Historic Hong Kong police compound to partially reopen as heritage and arts centre in May
Conservation work for the HK$1.8 billion project on Hollywood Road started in 2011 but faced a setback when a wall and roof partially collapsed two years ago
South China Morning Post Excerpt
March 25, 2018

Hong Kong’s 154-year-old former Central Police Station compound, which is being turned into a heritage and arts site, is expected to partly open to the public as early as May after seven years of conservation, the Post has learned.

At least one of the compound’s 16 historic buildings – the three-storey Married Inspectors’ Quarters built in 1864 – may remain closed due to ongoing efforts to restore a wall and part of its roof, which collapsed in 2016, a few months before the conservation was expected to be completed.

The HK$1.8 billion (US$230.8 million) project on Hollywood Road, led by the Hong Kong Jockey Club, was conceptualised in 2007 and conservation work started in 2011.

The Post learned that the Jockey Club had targeted opening part of the compound to the public in late May, pending approval from government bodies.

TAI KWUN_10 by RAYMOND TAM PHOTO - ONEPLUS STUDIO PHOTOGRAPHY, on Flickr

TAI KWUN_15 by RAYMOND TAM PHOTO - ONEPLUS STUDIO PHOTOGRAPHY, on Flickr
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Old Posted Apr 11, 2019, 1:45 PM
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Heritage gas lamps that ‘witnessed Hong Kong’s development’ remain in disrepair after Typhoon Mangkhut
Installations are located at iconic Central site which includes flight of famous stairs often shown in films
Fallen trees and wrath of monster storm have laid waste to area, as pressure mounts to restore venue’s charm

South China Morning Post Excerpt
Dec 30, 2018


R0015791 by Yi Shian Huang, on Flickr

Four iconic gas lamps in the heart of Hong Kong’s Central remain in disrepair more than three months after they were wrecked by a monster storm, with officials still looking into ways to restore the heritage items.

The sweeping granite stairway on Duddell Street, with its softly glowing gas lamps and classic balustrades, has been the site of numerous scenes of drama and romance in local films and TV shows, including one featuring Cecilia Cheung Pak-chi rushing down the famed steps in Stephen Chow Sing-chi’s 1999 film King of Comedy.

The last remaining gas lamps before the introduction of neon lights, they are one of the 120 declared monuments in Hong Kong, which receive the highest level of government protection.

Andrew Lam Siu-lo, outgoing chairman of the government’s Antiquities Advisory Board, said the monument had to be restored to its original design because of its legal status.

He said officials had briefly informed the board of a maintenance plan.

More : https://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/...lopment-remain
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Old Posted May 4, 2019, 12:45 PM
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Hong Kong’s Haw Par Mansion reopens but there is disenchantment for locals who remember its famous Tiger Balm Garden
The mansion, built by the Burmese Chinese tycoon Aw Boon Haw in 1936, now houses a centre for teaching and performing music
Its adjacent fantastical gardens, once dear to Hongkongers, were demolished to make way for luxury housing in 2004

May 4, 2019
South China Morning Post Excerpt






on.cc

At Hong Kong’s newly reopened historic site Haw Par Mansion, visitors old enough to remember the place in its previous incarnation were wistful about what has been lost.

“It’s such a pity,” said Sunny Lau, 72, a retired civil servant. “It was so much bigger with so much more to see in the past. There’s nothing special here now.”

Lau visited the site in Tai Hang when he was 13. At that time, the iconic Tiger Balm Garden, a fantastically surreal public park that was like Alice in Wonderland crossed with the horror film Saw and infused with a hefty dollop of Buddhism, was still in its heyday, long before it would be demolished and replaced by luxury housing.

Today only the mansion and a small garden remain.

The estate, one of the most popular parks in old Hong Kong, was built by the Burmese Chinese entrepreneur Aw Boon Haw in 1936 to publicise his Tiger Balm ointment products, provide a public open space and to educate the Hong Kong Chinese about their culture with the park’s depictions of characters from traditional folklore and religious moral lessons.

The surviving parts of the heritage site were opened to the public last month after a three-year renovation.

Operated by the Aw Boon Haw Foundation and the Haw Par Music Foundation under a government-sponsored scheme to revitalise historic buildings, the site was restored at a cost of HK$167 million (US$21.3 million) by its 2015 estimation and now serves as a venue for Western and Chinese music teaching and performances.

More : https://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/...disenchantment
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