HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > General Development

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #41  
Old Posted Mar 18, 2009, 4:33 AM
koval95's Avatar
koval95 koval95 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 135
woa it looks beautifull!!!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #42  
Old Posted Mar 18, 2009, 11:40 AM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 40,150
Quote:
Originally Posted by KVNBKLYN View Post
I don't think this rendering has been posted here before. I think it gives a really good sense of the scale of the entrance to the transit hub.

From the NYTimes:



http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/20...cts-lumber-on/
Yeah, it's still pretty close to the original vision. I don't think anyone would know there was a difference...
__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #43  
Old Posted Mar 19, 2009, 6:18 AM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 40,150
Memorial update from morrongiello





__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #44  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2009, 11:50 AM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 40,150
http://www.nypost.com/seven/03232009...bit_160872.htm

ANTENNA IN 9/11 EXHIBIT

March 23, 2009

The TV antenna that once topped the north tower of the World Trade Center last seen riding a massive cloud of dust as the building crashed to the ground will play a key role in the 9/11 Memorial's museum.

"The antenna has a kind of poignancy to it. It was a distinguishing mark, and you knew it was the north tower because it was up there," said Alice Greenwald, director of the Memorial Museum.

Recalling the "incredibly painful memory of the tower collapse," Greenwald said, "Through that intense cloud of dust you see this antenna tower going down, down, down.

"Re-encountering it in the safe space of the museum is a way of paying homage."

A salvaged 20-foot section of the 360-foot-tall antenna will be put on display in a gallery designed for the piece.


Its massive size and weight (47,000 pounds) will help convey the enormity of the towers, Greenwald said.

The museum is slated to open about a year after the Memorial Plaza, which is now set for the 10th anniversary of the attacks.
__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #45  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2009, 11:35 AM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 40,150
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/24/ny...l?ref=nyregion

Display of Names at Trade Center Memorial Is a Painstaking Process


By DAVID W. DUNLAP
March 23, 2009

Each name, slightly more than one-and-a-half inches tall, will carry the most intimate memories. All 2,982 names together, arrayed atop parapets stretching more than 1,500 feet around two great pools, will convey the vastness of the loss.

With such a range of scale and so many emotions attached, it is no wonder that one of the simplest architectural details of the new World Trade Center — the parapets around the memorial pools — has taken so long to design.

Officials with the National September 11 Memorial and Museum hope to unveil the final design of the parapets by summer.
“It’s been a great learning process,” said Joseph C. Daniels, the president and chief executive. It has also been a prolonged, exacting and sometimes contentious process.

It has involved full-scale mockups at a Lower Manhattan office, at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, at a warehouse in Berkeley, Calif., and a backyard in Richmond Hill, Ontario. It has required endless tinkering with the size, shape and style of letters. It has called for painstaking efforts to harness water so that it will perform just right. It has compelled constant adjustments to the parapets’ perimeters to ensure the best sight lines.

And it has meant confronting a requirement in the New York City Building Code that the parapets be exactly 42 inches high.

Each move threatened to complicate what is intended to be a stark embodiment of absence. “The guiding principle was not to have anything additive or unnecessary,” said the architect Michael Arad. His entry won the memorial design competition in 2003, after he was paired with the landscape architectural firm Peter Walker & Partners of Berkeley.

There have been so many revisions that the designers almost ran out of alphabet. “We ended up at Option Y,” Mr. Arad said.

Mr. Arad’s original notion was to place enormous sunken pools where the twin towers stood. Underground galleries were to surround the pools, with low parapets on which the victims’ names would be inscribed. However, these galleries were eliminated in 2006 to save money. That brought the names display to street level, turning the plaza into the memorial.

Another important change in 2006 occurred when Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, who is the chairman of the memorial, gave up the idea of displaying names randomly. Instead, they will be arranged to keep co-workers and family members together.

There will be 1,568 names around the north pool, representing 1,475 people who were in or around the north tower, 87 people aboard the jetliner that hit it and 6 victims of the 1993 bombing of the trade center. The 1,414 names around the south pool will include 441 emergency workers — chiefly firefighters and police officers, 690 people from the south tower, 60 from the plane that hit it, 125 at the Pentagon, 59 from the jetliner that hit it and 39 from the jet that crashed in Pennsylvania.

In 2007, the designers explored a creative way to comply with the building code. It involved small peripheral pools at plaza level where water will be stored before falling into the giant pools below. If these upper pools were 42 inches deep, the designers reasoned, they would honor the barrier requirement unobtrusively. The names panels would have been almost flush with the plaza surface, set within the upper pools.

Abstractly speaking, it was elegant. But there were problems. “Having the names on the ground made some individuals feel they weren’t getting the respect they needed,” Mr. Daniels said.

Another concern, he said, was that the absence of any visible barriers might make visitors anxious about approaching the edge of the enormous pools and waterfalls. “It shouldn’t be a scary experience,” Mr. Daniels said. “It should be awe-inspiring and reverential.”

But what finally compelled the designers to raise the name panels roughly to an adult’s waist level — besides the requirement to do so — was the idea that visitors would want to touch the names as well as read them.

“The moment of circumnavigation around the pools is a moment of communion with the dead,” Mr. Arad said, “and the notion of making it felt is very important.”

Thomas H. Rogér, a memorial board member whose daughter, Jean, was a crew member on the plane that hit the north tower, recalled going “back and forth” on such details as whether the letters in the names should be raised or cut out.

In the end, the designers decided that cut-out letters would work best for rubbings and could be effectively back-lit at night. (The typeface they chose, Optima, was designed by Hermann Zapf in 1958.) Raised letters will indicate categories like Flight 11, North Tower or Engine Company 10.

Even an element so minute had a meaningful consequence. “A big part of the whole issue are the rubbings that people will want to take of the names,” Mr. Rogér said. “That was something we never wanted to lose.”
__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #46  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2009, 11:44 AM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 40,150
http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/200...how_index.html


As part of the Brooklyn mockup, a shallow peripheral pool was constructed that would, in essence, serve as the barrier between visitors and the edge of the great waterfalls beyond. A test panel in bronze showed how raised letters would look if they were slightly submerged, just breaking the water's surface.


Another test panel showed what would happen if the letters were cut out and slightly submerged. The surface tension of the water actually created its own soft form around the letters, which -- like the enormous pools beyond them -- were voids.


During design development, one theme that emerged forcefully was that many visitors would want to be able to make rubbings of the names to take with them as tangible and personal mementos. Memorial officials have given thought to creating kits especially for that purpose.


It turned out that cut-out letters offered the best and clearest form for rubbing -- as anyone would know who has done so in an old cemetery. They can also be illuminated from within so that they glow at night. The capital C is just over an inch and a half high. The typeface is Optima, designed by Hermann Zapf in 1958.


The typeface used for the categories -- Flight 93, North Tower, Engine Company 10 and the like -- is also Optima. But it is raised on almost sculptural ridges, rather than being cut out. The bronze gives it an especially appealing tactile quality. Many hands are sure to pass over it.
__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #47  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2009, 12:34 PM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 40,150
Update from morrongiello




__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #48  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2009, 8:15 PM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 40,150
http://panynj.com/AboutthePortAuthor...ex.php?id=1217

PORT AUTHORITY BOARD AWARDS LARGEST CONTRACT FOR WORLD TRADE CENTER TRANSPORTATION HUB

March 26, 2009


The Port Authority Board of Commissioners today awarded a contract for more than 22,000 tons of steel for the World Trade Center Transportation Hub - the largest contract awarded to date for the major transportation facility.

The Board awarded a $338.8 million contract to DCM Erectors to furnish, fabricate and erect 22,305 tons of structural steel for the Transportation Hub. The steel award covers steel to build the Transportation Hub to grade, including the Transit Hall, the permanent underpinning of the No. 1 subway box and Greenwich Street, and Hub-related pedestrian connections that link it to the other commercial components of the World Trade Center.

The amount of steel awarded for the Hub project is equivalent to the entire weight of the USS New York (the Navy's new amphibious transport ship), or almost twice the amount of steel used for the new Yankee Stadium.

DCM is a multi-national firm with headquarters in New York and Canada. DCM is furnishing and erecting the steel for both One World Trade Center and Four World Trade Center. They also have fabricated steel for the New York Times building, the Bloomberg Tower and the Time Warner Center, among many other projects in the region.
__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #49  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2009, 8:56 PM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 40,150
http://downtownexpress.com/de_309/bustleanddelay.html

In the depths of the memorial construction, the “Survivors Staircase” that some office workers used to flee the site on 9/11 is still visible, though steel is starting to surround it. The National September 11 Memorial & Museum will add other large artifacts to the site as it is built, since there won’t be room to bring them in once the construction is complete.

The next artifact to arrive will be the “Last Column,” a 36-foot steel beam covered with mementos from rescue workers before it was removed in May 2002, said Michelle Breslauer, spokesperson for the memorial museum. The column will be moved into place this summer, likely with a cover to protect it from the surrounding construction.

Meanwhile, the memorial’s structure will continue to take shape. Workers will pour concrete slabs this spring, and steel installation will finish by the end of the year.
__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #50  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2009, 11:40 PM
Duffstuff129's Avatar
Duffstuff129 Duffstuff129 is offline
Charismatic Stallion
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Manhattan
Posts: 576
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYguy View Post


[b]As part of the Brooklyn mockup, a shallow peripheral pool was constructed that would, in essence, serve as the barrier between visitors and the edge of the great waterfalls beyond. A test panel in bronze showed how raised letters would look if they were slightly submerged, just breaking the water's surface.


Another test panel showed what would happen if the letters were cut out and slightly submerged. The surface tension of the water actually created its own soft form around the letters, which -- like the enormous pools beyond them -- were voids.
Hats off to the designer, this is the first memorial ever that I have truly been able to appreciate. It's beautiful, impacting, and causes inner reflection in the user (or at least it did for me).

Also, the enormity of it all (more than 3000 names) will be truly staggering.

If they choose the second design, I'm sure that the entire memorial plaza will be covered with nostalgic, sad tears. In a good way.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2009, 5:24 PM
KVNBKLYN KVNBKLYN is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Brooklyn
Posts: 343
Same basic info as the PA press release posted above, but I like the rendering.

From the NY Times:

Quote:



The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey awarded a $338.8 million contract on Thursday to DCM Erectors, which will furnish, fabricate and erect the 22,000 tons of steel needed to construct the World Trade Center Transportation Hub from bedrock to street level. This does not include the distinctive birdlike canopy over the main hall.

The effective steel price in the new contract is $9,000 a ton, the authority said, which is several hundred dollars less than the price per ton for the steel used in a recently built underground concourse.

Dollar for dollar, it is the largest steel contract yet to be awarded at the trade center site. DCM won the second largest contract, too; $276.48 million for 45,000 tons of steel for 1 World Trade Center.

DCM has a plant in South Plainfield, N.J., where about 40 percent of the steel for the transportation hub will be fabricated. Anthony R. Coscia, the chairman of the authority, said the latest contract was therefore “great news for our local economy.”

The street-level roof of the transportation hub’s mezzanine is also the base of the memorial plaza. Christopher O. Ward, the executive director of the authority, said, “We’ve moved one step closer to meeting our commitment to open the memorial in time for the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks.”
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #52  
Old Posted Apr 7, 2009, 4:02 PM
talltowers08 talltowers08 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 109
looks likethey are pouring concreat for the North pool http://www.earthcam.net/users2/inter...2&clientid=158
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #53  
Old Posted Apr 7, 2009, 11:50 PM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 40,150
__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #54  
Old Posted Apr 8, 2009, 11:35 AM
talltowers08 talltowers08 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 109
Great photos Nyguy any news about the chiller plant ?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #55  
Old Posted Apr 8, 2009, 11:43 AM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 40,150
Quote:
Originally Posted by talltowers08 View Post
Great photos Nyguy any news about the chiller plant ?
There was an article from the Times posted on wtc.com
http://www.wtc.com/news/using-the-hu...e-trade-center
__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #56  
Old Posted Apr 8, 2009, 4:12 PM
talltowers08 talltowers08 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 109
amazing news cant wait for this to happen
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #57  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2009, 5:38 AM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 40,150
morrongiello, April 9




__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #58  
Old Posted Apr 14, 2009, 11:56 AM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 40,150
Update from morrongiello, (April 13)




__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #59  
Old Posted Apr 14, 2009, 3:24 PM
philvia's Avatar
philvia philvia is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 452
if morrongiello is going to document their construction, he should at least stop using his cellphone camera and invest in a real one
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #60  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2009, 8:20 PM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 40,150
Quote:
Originally Posted by philvia View Post
if morrongiello is going to document their construction, he should at least stop using his cellphone camera and invest in a real one
He's obviously satisfied with what he has. You're welcome to use your own.
__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > General Development
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:51 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.