HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > General Development

    

South Street Seaport Tower in the SkyscraperPage Database

Building Data Page   • New York Skyscraper Diagram
New York Projects & Construction Forum
            
View Full Map

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #61  
Old Posted Feb 8, 2013, 1:36 AM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 40,085
I think it is a missed oppurtunity to do something bold here. It's not really all that different from what's there now, and in time will probably be considered the same. But people are just too afraid of change to have anything dramatically different than what already is. Even the simple signage had to be dropped.
__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #62  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2013, 9:42 PM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 40,085
http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2013/1...ndbreaking.php

New Renderings Revealed At Pier 17 'Groundbreaking'

Thursday, October 17, 2013, by Jessica Dailey













More renderings in the link.
__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #63  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2013, 4:15 AM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 40,085
Back home to some sort of exciting news...



http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/19/ny...ower.html?_r=0

Plan to Redevelop South Street Seaport Includes Marina and 50-Story Tower






By CHARLES V BAGLI
November 18, 2013


Quote:
South Street Seaport, an often-neglected corner of Manhattan dedicated to enshrining New York’s seafaring past, has been battered by storms, recessions and poor management.

Now, there is a proposal for a major redevelopment of the cobblestone streets, 19th-century brick buildings and piers that would include the reconstruction of the landmark Tin Building and the addition of a marina and a 50-story hotel and apartment tower.

The Howard Hughes Corporation, which controls the seaport under a lease with the city, says it wants to enliven the area and establish a destination for both tourists and New Yorkers.

It is unclear how a glassy tower on the north side of Pier 17 would fit into the historical fabric of the area, but Howard Hughes contends that the building would be the “economic engine” that would allow for the rehabilitation of the crumbling piers and nearby buildings.

The proposal, the company said, will include a still-to-be-determined rescue plan for the financially ailing Seaport Museum, and the sailing ships at Pier 17, which are slowly sinking into the East River.

“The re-envisioned seaport district will transform the piers’ iconic waterfront setting into a vibrant, highly engaging area,” said David R. Weinreb, chief executive of Howard Hughes, “while providing a critical catalyst for the revitalization of Lower Manhattan.”

The company is to unveil its preliminary plan for the first time on Tuesday to local residents and members of Community Board 1, which includes the seaport.

The company’s proposal must be approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission and the City Council before construction can start.

Catherine M. Hughes, chairwoman of Community Board 1, said she was glad to finally see the developer’s master plan, which appears to have met many of the community’s concerns. “We understand that in order for it to succeed and provide community amenities it needs to be economically viable,” she said.

Councilwoman Gale A. Brewer, who was recently elected Manhattan borough president and will take office in January, said she had reservations about the height of the apartment tower.

Before Howard Hughes, General Growth Properties controlled the lease at the Seaport and in 2008 initiated its own plan for redeveloping the area, including a 42-story apartment tower. That plan was rejected by the landmarks commission before the company went into bankruptcy.

.....“Like it or not, the whole city is a festival market now,” said Gregg Pasquarelli, a principal at SHoP Architects, who is working on the plan for Howard Hughes. “We want to get New Yorkers to come to the seaport, where there’ll be unique shops and history. The tourists will come anyway.”
__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #64  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2013, 5:52 AM
JayPro JayPro is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: South Huntington, Long Island, New York
Posts: 1,047
I had no idea the old ships were as bad off as they were. There's no reason why the whole area should've come to this condition to begin with.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #65  
Old Posted Nov 20, 2013, 11:57 PM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 40,085
http://www.downtownexpress.com/2013/...-tower-marina/

Angry reaction to plan for Seaport tower & marina





November 20, 2013
Posted by: Josh Rogers


Quote:
Howard Hughes Corp unveiled its plans Tuesday night to build a hotel and residential tower and a marina at the Seaport.

As expected, the plan got a chilly reception at Community Board 1’s Seaport Committee, which had long feared the corporation was planning a large development at the two building sites in question.

Both buildings, the Tin and New Market, were part of the old Fulton Fish Market, but only the Tin is in the city’s historic district.

The New Market site has long been viewed by the city, Hughes and its predecessors as a prime development site, and it appears the Hughes Corp. would not need city landmarks approval for the tower portion of its plan.

The New York Times reported that the tower would be 50 stories but it was not clear at the meeting precisely how tall it would be.


A few hundred people packed the room Nov. 19, many with signs saying “Save Our Seaport,” others shouting angry questions at the development team.

At the end of the evening, C.B. 1’s John Fratta said, “at this point we are opposed to any kind of tower on the New Market site.”

The Board 1 committee passed a resolution to that effect but it will be at least several months before the proposal becomes a formal presentation by which the community board will take an advisory vote.

Hughes executives said at the meeting that the proposal is still being revised.

It’s not yet clear how the project will be viewed by the incoming de Blasio administration, which will play a key role in advancing or nixing the plan.

In an effort to counter a criticism made at the meeting, Gregg Pasquarelli of SHoP Architects, the project’s designer, said because the tower will be narrow, it will not cast too many shadows on the South Street Seaport Historic District.

Five years ago, Pasquarelli, working for Hughes’ predecessor, General Growth Properties, designed a 500-foot tower for the area. He also proposed moving and restoring the Tin Building at the east end of Pier 17 at the waterfront’s edge.

But the plan did not advance far and General Growth ended up filing for bankruptcy.

Under the current plan, which would require Landmarks Preservation Commission approval, the Tin would be elevated to five feet above the flood plain, one story would be added, and the building would move somewhat closer to the water. The building would house a food market under a commitment that Hughes Corp. made earlier this year as part of the approval to demolish and rebuild a new Pier 17 mall. It would be open seven days a week.

C.B.1 chairperson Catherine McVay Hughes, who is not connected to the corporation, attended the meeting but did not indicate initial support or opposition for the project. Earlier that day she was quoted in a New York Times article, saying “We understand that in order for it to succeed and provide community amenities, it needs to be economically viable.”

On Wednesday, the Hughes firm issued a press release outlining support from the leaders of business and labor orgaizations including Robert Douglass, chairperson of the Downtown Alliance, who said, “The South Street Seaport area is in need of continuing revitalization after Superstorm Sandy. The Howard Hughes Corporation’s plan for Pier 17 is an extraordinary piece of that revitalization,” bringing “even more residents, tourists and excitement to Lower Manhattan.”


http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2013/1...tower.php#more

__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #66  
Old Posted Dec 2, 2013, 6:02 PM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 40,085
Quote:

I have to laugh at this photo again. The only things missing are torches and pitchforks.




http://nypost.com/2013/12/01/new-foo...treet-seaport/

New food market coming to South Street Seaport

By Jennifer Gould Keil
December 1, 2013


Quote:
A new global marketplace is coming to the South Street Seaport, Side Dish has learned.

While the Howard Hughes Corp. awaits approval for its proposed 50-story hotel and condo tower with retail space, among other developments, it is also formulating a plan for a new food market that could top 40,000 square feet, sources said.

The Seaport is talking to various celebrity chefs (“you can count them on one hand”) to curate the marketplace experience, according to a source.

In contrast to Mario Batali’s Eataly, which focuses on Italian cuisine, the Seaport is considering a more globally diverse marketplace with select specialty foods as seen through the eyes of one master chef.

If the new luxury tower gets city approval, that would add 130,000 square feet of retail space, for a total of 500,000 feet for retail, dining and entertainment purposes.
__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #67  
Old Posted Dec 2, 2013, 9:50 PM
JayPro JayPro is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: South Huntington, Long Island, New York
Posts: 1,047
How convenient for me to pick up where I left off with my last comment.

Judging from the protestations afoot (color me shocked BTW ), these NIMBYciles would indeed have it no other way that just how I assessed the situation.

I mean, if what these bozos are trying to save is a blighted historic district headed for inexorable disintegration at the speed of continental drift if nothing gets fecking done yesterday...

...then I dunno what to say by now.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #68  
Old Posted Dec 2, 2013, 11:29 PM
De Minimis NY De Minimis NY is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Hell's Kitchen, NY
Posts: 68
I just wish that they had designed something more interesting for this location.

The proposed plan is great filler, but it lacks the unique silhouette that this particular location deserves. Given where it will stand, permanently separated from the mass of lower Manhattan by the FDR, it should be designed as a stand-alone monument (something like 400 Park Ave South would be amazing) rather than yet another relatively rectangular form best-suited for a mid-block plot.

I don't think this proposal is terrible, but I think it's a real missed opportunity for one of the few locations in manhattan where you will be able to see a tower's entire form without much else in the way.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #69  
Old Posted Dec 3, 2013, 12:41 AM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 40,085
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayPro View Post
I mean, if what these bozos are trying to save is a blighted historic district headed for inexorable disintegration at the speed of continental drift if nothing gets fecking done yesterday...

From the looks of that angry mob, they would sooner throw you into the east river (with cement boots) than have a tower rise anywhere.
__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #70  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2014, 8:43 PM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 40,085
http://www.downtownexpress.com/2014/...fight-to-come/

The Seaport Fight to Come




Rendering of the proposed marina at the South Street Seaport, which Howard Hughes Corp. considers a community amenity as part of its tower and redevelopment plan.


January 16, 2014


Quote:
Before the de Blasio administration begins to consider a proposal to build a 600-foot tower at the South Street Seaport, officials want to see affordable housing added to the plan, according to the project’s developer.

Chris Curry, senior executive vice president of development of the Howard Hughes Corp., the Seaport’s developer revealed last week that the firm reached out to Bill de Blasio during his mayoral transition, and a few advisers told Curry in December that the best way to make the plan more appealing would be to add some type of subsidized housing.

“I know the administration has already mentioned to us… affordable housing,” Curry said during a presentation of the project to Downtown Express Jan. 7. “[It’s] very important to the mayor.”

He said it was not clear if the affordable housing needed to be included in the tower, which is strongly opposed in the community, or if it could be built somewhere off the site in order to curry favor with the mayor.

When the mayor-elect announced Dec. 31 that Kyle Kimball would be continuing on as president of the city’s Economic Development Corp., Kimball said in a prepared statement that “we will innovate in new ways to spur affordable housing and meet the needs of neighborhoods.”

Kimball’s agency owns much of the Seaport and will be negotiating with the Hughes Corp. on its latest proposal to build a tower on the New Market Building site.

The mixed use building is likely to have apartments, a hotel and retail.

Curry is taking comfort in de Blasio’s decision to retain Kimball.

“I think that it’s helpful for us that Kyle was appointed president of E.D.C.,” Curry said. “Now that doesn’t mean the administration is gonna have the same perspective as the previous administration did, but I think it’s helpful to him to be able to articulate to the new administration what it is we’ve beentrying to do for the last three years.”

Similarly, during the same meeting last week, the project’s lead designer, Gregg Pasquarelli of SHoP Architects, pointed out that his firm has worked with E.D.C. for a decade to redesign Lower Manhattan’s East Side waterfront immediately north and south of the Hughes project.

“It’s nice to know there’s people there who understand why we made the decisions we made for the last ten years,” Pasquarelli said. “This is really the critical point in the development of that whole waterfront.”

Adding affordable housing by itself though, is not likely to win over much community support.

“That may be fine for the administration but not for the community,” John Fratta, chairperson of Community Board 1’s Seaport Committee, told Downtown Express when told of the message from the de Blasio camp. “It’s still a tower and it just doesn’t belong.”


Hughes has not finalized its proposal, and negotiations with the various parties have not begun, but the parameters of the talks are becoming clearer.

C.B.1 and the local politicians are united in opposing a 600-foot tower, but if that height were to drop significantly, and large community amenities were added, a split would probably form, as some in the community might accept a smaller tower if there were enough sweeteners.

The board discussed that issue briefly last month.

“We don’t want to confuse the issue of the tower and anything else,” said Joe Lerner, a board member who lives in the Seaport area. “We are not selling our life and giving them a tower.”

And Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver told Downtown Express last month that he could envision negotiations beginning around a smaller building.

“We’ve expressed our opposition to the height of the tower just as an opening,” Silver said, but if the height were reduced, “yeah, I think if we sit down with Catherine [McVay Hughes, C.B.1 chairperson] and other members of the community board and work out some of the things the community needs — obviously that’s what dialogue is about.”


__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #71  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2014, 8:59 AM
LMich's Avatar
LMich LMich is offline
Midwest Moderator - Editor
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Big Mitten
Posts: 31,719
I don't get the concern about the height. We're not talking about some 600-foot luxury condo building in the north bronx, we're talking about what is largely a tourist attraction in Lower Manhattan literally on the edge of the borough. It's not as if they are bulldozing an entire historic neighborhood or something.

And, the critiques are all over the place.

People are giving hints that the administration would give this project better treatment if it included affordable housing, but that's in direct constrast to the community, who apparently doesn't want affordable housing. Their concern seems to be the height, which unlike the affordable housing critique, seems like a completely illegitimate concern given the location practically in the river.

You can't win for losing, I guess.
__________________
Where the trees are the right height
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #72  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2014, 11:47 AM
a very long weekend's Avatar
a very long weekend a very long weekend is offline
dazzle me
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: 94109
Posts: 761
in a normal situation, the politicians would tell these 40-60 people to stuff it. i'm guessing someone with a direct line to sheldon silver (can't believe that creep is still around) made a call and promised to get him to work on it. prediction: easy developer win.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #73  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2014, 2:05 PM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 40,085
Quote:
Originally Posted by LMich View Post
People are giving hints that the administration would give this project better treatment if it included affordable housing, but that's in direct constrast to the community, who apparently doesn't want affordable housing. Their concern seems to be the height, which unlike the affordable housing critique, seems like a completely illegitimate concern given the location practically in the river.
It reminds me of one of the quotes of former mayor Rudy Guiliani with regards to the NIMBYs - "They're against everything!"

That sums it up perfectly here. You know if the proposal were only 10 stories, they would find issue with it one way or another. They don't want any new development, and especially no new skyscrapers. They want everything to stay just the way it is, so they could then complain about everything being just the way it is.



http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/4543...-stakeholders/

Seaport Tower Plan ‘Obscene,’ Say Stakeholders
Locals express reservations about tower development at famed East River tourist spot










By Genevieve Belmaker
January 17, 2014


Quote:
Standing in front of a packed room of New Yorkers, Chris Curry detailed the Texas-based developer’s vision for the South Street Seaport. Already a popular New York City tourist destination teeming with character, the developer will build modern amenities and restore the Seaport’s deteriorated pier pilings. Curry said it’s a win-win-win for the city, its residents, and the developer.

By and large, the response and input has been positive and constructive, with little to no opposition, said Curry, senior executive vice president of development for the Howard Hughes Corporation (HHC).

He said the corporation has solicited feedback in various forms from over 1,000 stakeholders, including residents, and the response has been largely constructive and supportive.

At the Jan. 13 town hall meeting and in other similar public settings, Curry has often characterized support from the city and local stakeholders as a mandate to move forward with the development.

Many in the community see the reality as otherwise.

At the town hall meeting before the local community board, an early key milestone in the city’s standard development review process, a majority of the eight organizations and 47 individuals who publicly testified expressed reservations about HHC’s plan. Some were emotional. Some were outright angry.


“The Brooklyn Bridge and the South Street Seaport vista are known around the world,” said Joel Sasinski, a 25-year resident of nearby Southbridge Towers, who said he once saw a poster in Paris advertising the destination.

Sasinski said to impose a high-rise building, which some community members have compared to a pastrami sandwich, in the middle of the famed skyline, would be akin to creating “an obscene gesture.” His comment, along with his raised middle finger, sent a wave of uproarious applause through the crowd. Others in the room echoed the idea of the tower as obscene.

“I hope the city rejects this proposal outright,” said Sasinski.

Of great concern for many is HHC’s proposal to build a high-rise tower at the water’s edge, obstructing the open view of the Brooklyn Bridge and adding an uncharacteristically tall tower to a skyline of three- and four-story historic brick buildings.

HHC maintains its series of developments will be financed by the revenue produced by the tower, which involves high-end apartment units, hotel space, and an adjacent marina. The revenue will offset the more than $125 million price tag for the work, as well as maintenance costs for the pier pilings, which support the district’s buildings.

That’s money that HHC said it will be saving the city, in both the short term, and the long term.

“It’s very important for people to understand the economic ramifications [of these plans],” Curry told the community.

The project involves restoring and moving a historic building, expanding street access, repairing and replacing badly damaged pier pilings, and demolishing the former site of the Fulton Fish Market (called the New Market Building), the site of the proposed tower.

HHC’s vision is to create a shopping, dining, and entertainment destination that caters to the 9 million tourists and visitors that flow through the area every year. According to Travel and Leisure magazine, the Seaport is the 26th most popular tourist destination in the world.

Save the Seaport

Even with the projected financial benefits for the city and increased shopping and dining amenities, objections to building the tower in a prized and singularly unique historic district have been strong.

“These are public assets, and at the moment they have been de-facto privatized by the old (mayoral) administration and the old EDC,” said Michael Kramer, a member of the community group Save Our Seaport.

Kramer and his group are also deeply worried over the future of the South Street Seaport Museum, which has a number of assets in the area, including world-renowned historic buildings, an irreplaceable treasure trove of maritime archival material, and antique ships. The museum’s main building has been closed since Superstorm Sandy and its stewardship was passed from the Museum of the City of New York to an interim board.

“We don’t want the development of the new Howard Hughes Corporation tower to be tied to the South Street Seaport Museum,” said Kramer. “We want the museum to be in control of the waterfront—we think they’re more qualified than Howard Hughes.”

Pastrami Tower

Some longtime residents and professionals with roots in the neighborhood are agitated at the prospect of a skyscraper amid nothing but low-rise brick buildings on Manhattan’s waterfront.

Others have taken to characterizing it as a pastrami sandwich on the waterfront, based on the architect’s rendering of piles of dark brown pastrami-colored floors stacked up between the odd light colored floors resembling bread.

The overarching sticking point, though, continues to be the destruction of the New Market Building to make way for the new development.

“We do have concerns about the proposed redevelopment of the New Market Building,” said Roland Lewis, president and CEO of the Metropolitan Waterfront Alliance (MWA), which represents over 700 organizations with waterway interests in New York City.

Lewis is also a board member of the New Amsterdam Market that wants to restore and use the building for a permanent public market space. Aside from the esthetic and contextual neighborhood concerns, he pointed out that the city of New York “has not built in the water for a long time.”

Robert LaValva, founder and president of the New Amsterdam Market and one of HHC’s most vocal critics, has formed a group to oppose the plan called Just Press Pause. The group wants the city to stop and rethink the plan, and use a master planning process that closely involves all levels of stakeholders, from local residents to business owners to the city.

“Our aim is not to fight against the current plan by Howard Hughes,” said LaValva at the town hall meeting. “We don’t think we should have to fight against a plan that should never have been proposed.”


__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #74  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2014, 2:21 PM
LMich's Avatar
LMich LMich is offline
Midwest Moderator - Editor
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Big Mitten
Posts: 31,719
Save the Seaport?! Really? From what? Increased usage, more success?!

Maybe I'm missing something. What's being demolished? Any pictures?
__________________
Where the trees are the right height
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #75  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2014, 2:34 PM
chris08876's Avatar
chris08876 chris08876 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: New Jersey - Somerset County
Posts: 26,506


They look like they are mad at the world. These people give New Yorkers a bad name. Get over it!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #76  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2014, 3:06 PM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 40,085
Quote:
Originally Posted by LMich View Post
Save the Seaport?! Really? From what? Increased usage, more success?!

Maybe I'm missing something. What's being demolished? Any pictures?

I've forgotten a lot about this development over the years that it went nowhere. The plan is to demolish one building, and move another.


The building to be demolished is this one, the "New Market Building", and build the tower there.



http://workingharbor.wordpress.com/2...treet-seaport/



http://workingharbor.wordpress.com/2...treet-seaport/



http://blog.archpaper.com/wordpress/archives/56906
__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #77  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2014, 3:15 PM
LMich's Avatar
LMich LMich is offline
Midwest Moderator - Editor
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Big Mitten
Posts: 31,719
I'm actually a fan of the era from which the New Market Building was built, but it's not so architecturally special as warrant the derailing of this project. What does the "Tin Building" look like? There were some aerials, but it didn't show much. It appears even less architecturally significant, but I could be wrong.
__________________
Where the trees are the right height
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #78  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2014, 3:34 PM
NYguy's Avatar
NYguy NYguy is offline
New Yorker for life
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Borough of Jersey
Posts: 40,085
Quote:
Originally Posted by LMich View Post
I'm actually a fan of the era from which the New Market Building was built, but it's not so architecturally special as warrant the derailing of this project. What does the "Tin Building" look like? There were some aerials, but it didn't show much. It appears even less architecturally significant, but I could be wrong.
Grabbed a couple of shots from Google Earth...






__________________
NEW YORK. World's capital.

“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #79  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2014, 4:47 PM
wilfredo267 wilfredo267 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: New York City
Posts: 134
That building looks like stacks of bacon and its too ugly to be in such a prominent location on the skyline.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #80  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2014, 4:48 PM
Submariner's Avatar
Submariner Submariner is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,205
But think about the children!!!
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > General Development
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 4:03 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.