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  #41  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2018, 8:11 PM
Baronvonellis Baronvonellis is offline
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Timbkutu
Antwerp
Amsterdam
Rotterdam
Stockholm
Oslo
Malmo
Boston

Any good German name.

Munchen
Dresden
Nuremberg
Wurzburg
Leipzig
Berchtesgaden
Salzburg
Bad Reichenhall
Hallstatt

Native American names are annoying to me, I don't like how they sound.
Chicago sounds like I'm chewing on some gum, it's not crisp.
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  #42  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2018, 8:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muppet View Post
Be warned....

Video Link
Not to worry. I am not perturbed by that as any French-speaking kid on either side of the Atlantic would be able to sing the French version of the song, which I believe might be the original. I remember it from the 70s and my kids and all their friends who are noughties also know it. We even all know the hand gestures that go along with it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6TzhcDJ0Ko4

BTW there is no credible link between the song and the capital of Burkina Faso. Though being a francophone country I guess they probably sing it there too.
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  #43  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2018, 10:53 PM
isaidso isaidso is offline
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There are many but will shoot off some north American city names that come to mind.

Detroit
Vancouver
Mississauga
Oshawa
Ottawa

Grand Prairie
Akron
Wichita
Chattanooga
Tallahasse

Banff
Boston
Buffalo
Philadelphia
Knoxville

Anaheim
Pasadena
Milwaukee
Chicago
Oklahoma

Tulsa
Phoenix
Nome
Dawson City
Chihuahua
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Last edited by isaidso; Sep 18, 2018 at 11:13 PM.
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  #44  
Old Posted Yesterday, 1:49 PM
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Americas
Guadalajara
Philadelphia
San Francisco
Los Angeles
Baltimore
Montreal
Lafayette
Buenos Aires
Havana
Veracruz
Port au Prince
Anchorage

Africa
Nairobi
Kinshasa
Alexandria
Asmara

Asia/Oceania
Jakarta
Sydney
Wellington
Osaka
Singapore
Bombay (more than Mumbai)
Vladivostok

Europe
Marseilles
Liverpool
Budapest
Minsk
Barcelona
Copenhagen
Amsterdam
Kiev
Moscow

I'm typically not a fan of villes and burgs.
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  #45  
Old Posted Yesterday, 1:59 PM
Don't Be That Guy Don't Be That Guy is offline
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Just an aside, I love the city but I don't care for Pittsburgh as a city name. Add "Pitt," which can have a negative homophone with "Burg," which sound small and provincial and you get a name that doesn't project well. Keeping the original Scottish "Pittsborough" pronunciation just sounds nicer.

Related, Duquesne would have been a great alternative had the English not renamed the settlement after taking the eponymous fort.
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  #46  
Old Posted Yesterday, 4:31 PM
Baronvonellis Baronvonellis is offline
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Burg in German means a Castle, Berg means a Mountain. Both are for large strong powerful places. A castle was like a human made mountain. Nothing small about a burg

Nuremberg,Wurzburg ,Salzburg ... they all have big high castles to defend their cites

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don't Be That Guy View Post
Just an aside, I love the city but I don't care for Pittsburgh as a city name. Add "Pitt," which can have a negative homophone with "Burg," which sound small and provincial and you get a name that doesn't project well. Keeping the original Scottish "Pittsborough" pronunciation just sounds nicer.

Related, Duquesne would have been a great alternative had the English not renamed the settlement after taking the eponymous fort.
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  #47  
Old Posted Yesterday, 5:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Cirrus View Post
Wait, hold on, you're implying there is some other way people say that?

Like, Barkelona?

No. Ugh.
It's Barthelona in standard Spanish, and Barselona in Catalan. You can rest easy knowing no one on the Iberian peninsula is saying Barkelona. Though I'm not sure which pronunciation muppet had in mind, as "s" and "th" could both be considered soft c's I suppose.
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  #48  
Old Posted Yesterday, 8:37 PM
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I prefer the Catalan
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  #49  
Old Posted Yesterday, 8:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Not to worry. I am not perturbed by that as any French-speaking kid on either side of the Atlantic would be able to sing the French version of the song, which I believe might be the original. I remember it from the 70s and my kids and all their friends who are noughties also know it. We even all know the hand gestures that go along with it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6TzhcDJ0Ko4

BTW there is no credible link between the song and the capital of Burkina Faso. Though being a francophone country I guess they probably sing it there too.
erm humour bypass?
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  #50  
Old Posted Yesterday, 8:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muppet View Post
I prefer the Catalan
It's closer to the Fr-speaking pronunciation. We call it Barcelone here, or Barça for soccer fans, where either c or ç is pronounced like the Catalan s.

I agree that some Castilian sounds need an upgrade.
They kinda sound like they have some hair on their tongues, and their j is just rough.
Like in mujer. I have to scrape my throat to produce it, and it's a pain.
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  #51  
Old Posted Yesterday, 9:05 PM
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erm humour bypass?
I don't get it.

But yes, it did make me laugh. (I didn't know an English version of that existed!)
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  #52  
Old Posted Yesterday, 9:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Baronvonellis View Post
Burg in German means a Castle, Berg means a Mountain. Both are for large strong powerful places. A castle was like a human made mountain. Nothing small about a burg

Nuremberg,Wurzburg ,Salzburg ... they all have big high castles to defend their cites
Pretty the "burg" suffix in German refers to a town or city of some kind. Similar to "burgh" in Scotland, "bourg" in French, and even maybe "-ton" in English. Salzburg = Salt-Town.

Castle in German is "schloss" I am pretty sure.

Will be happily corrected if proven wrong.
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  #53  
Old Posted Yesterday, 9:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Baronvonellis View Post
Burg in German means a Castle, Berg means a Mountain. Both are for large strong powerful places. A castle was like a human made mountain. Nothing small about a burg

Nuremberg,Wurzburg ,Salzburg ... they all have big high castles to defend their cites
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Pretty the "burg" suffix in German refers to a town or city of some kind. Similar to "burgh" in Scotland, "bourg" in French, and even maybe "-ton" in English. Salzburg = Salt-Town.

Castle in German is "schloss" I am pretty sure.

Will be happily corrected if proven wrong.
English would be -borough, like the boroughs of NYC.

The meaning of fortress/castle and walled city both kind of make sense since historically many pre-modern big towns and cities were protected by defensive walls/castles.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burgh

"Burghs were typically settlements under the protection of a castle and usually had a market place, with a widened high street or junction, marked by a mercat cross, beside houses for the burgesses and other inhabitants."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burh

"A burh (Old English pronunciation: [ˈburx]) or burg was an Old English fortification or fortified settlement."
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  #54  
Old Posted Yesterday, 9:22 PM
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Also the same root as that eventually became the term "bourgeoisie", which originally were urbanites, often merchants and traders, who were wealthier than those in the rural hinterlands.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bourgeoisie

So, urbanites, city slickers, were associated with the middle class, if not elites.
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  #55  
Old Posted Yesterday, 10:07 PM
isaidso isaidso is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I remember it from the 70s and my kids and all their friends who are noughties also know it. We even all know the hand gestures that go along with it.
It goes to show what a cultural barrier language can be. Despite 2 years in Quebec and decades in the rest of Canada I've never heard of that song in any language. So that is taught to francophone kids in grade school?

Not including songs translated into English (like O Canada) the only francophone song that would be known in anglophone Canada is Alouette. Even there, I don't know the words but would know what song it was if I heard it.
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  #56  
Old Posted Yesterday, 10:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
It goes to show what a cultural barrier language can be. Despite 2 years in Quebec and decades in the rest of Canada I've never heard of that song in any language. So that is taught to francophone kids in grade school?

Not including songs translated into English (like O Canada) the only francophone song that would be known in anglophone Canada is Alouette. Even there, I don't know the words but would know what song it was if I heard it.
What about Frère Jacques?
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  #57  
Old Posted Yesterday, 10:33 PM
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I think Alouette and Frère Jacques are Francophone songs that are known through the Anglo world, not just Anglo Canada, spreading as kids' songs, but I may be wrong.
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  #58  
Old Posted Today, 2:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
It goes to show what a cultural barrier language can be. Despite 2 years in Quebec and decades in the rest of Canada I've never heard of that song in any language. So that is taught to francophone kids in grade school?
.
Agadou is a novelty pop song, but it's kind of attained nursery rhyme status. It has hand gestures associated with it which works in its favour.
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  #59  
Old Posted Today, 2:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Capsicum View Post
I think Alouette and Frère Jacques are Francophone songs that are known through the Anglo world, not just Anglo Canada, spreading as kids' songs, but I may be wrong.
I would assume that aside from songs like My Way and Beyond the Sea which are translations of French songs, most people would be familiar with perhaps an Édith Piaf song like La Vie en Rose.

There are a bunch of these non-English crossover songs that are known in the Anglosphere: think La Bamba or Cielito Lindo in Spanish, Volare in Italian, or even Sukiyaki in Japanese.
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  #60  
Old Posted Today, 3:24 AM
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Originally Posted by IrishIllini View Post
This is hilarious.
Haha...I kept waiting for someone to see that. It was a joke, of course (Schaumburg at the end of my list). I should have put it in the middle to see if people were really paying attention.
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