HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > City Compilations

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #16461  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2017, 7:37 PM
jjv007 jjv007 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 652
Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanRevival View Post
Economic trends and fundamentals underlie ANY construction boom in any city, and frankly, Philly is doing just as good, if not better, than many of the cities you mention.

For quick reference, here are the latest (October 2017) job growth numbers (year-over-year) for the metro areas you mention:

Metro Area (% Annual Jobs Growth Rate)

Boston (2.3%)
DC (1.4%)
Philadelphia (1.3%)
San Francisco (1.2%)
New York (0.9%)
Los Angeles (0.8%)
Chicago (0.5%)


https://www.bls.gov/news.release/metro.t04.htm

The only city on that list with any meaningfully faster growth is Boston, which I honestly don't see lasting (that area is on the precipice of a major labor shortage, and housing costs are a huge barrier-to-entry for young workers).

Not trying to incite a city-versus-city debate whatsoever, but the notion that Philly is still fundamentally weaker than other major metros economically is very much an "old school Philadelphia" way of thinking. It's simply not true any longer.

Now you may make the argument that a much greater proportion of the metro area's economic growth/jobs should be in the city proper, which is a valid point, and that is certainly true of late, but long-standing trends take time to change and alter. And Philly is doing much to level the "playing field" with the suburbs.
Annual jobs growth rate is not the greatest statistic to use because it fluctuates highly year by year; it also is just one statistic, a very broad one at that. Additionally, because it is a percentage statistic, it has to do with the number of jobs beforehand. It's like in the NFL, if a team is most improved, it doesn't make them the best team. I'll agree that Philly's doing some good things but is it considered a more attractive place to do business than any of the cities you mentioned? I don't think so.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16462  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2017, 8:02 PM
tsarstruck tsarstruck is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by iheartphilly View Post
Also, for the sake of discussion, what about this about millennial moving out of the city?

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-1...itch-city-life
Every bit of nonsensein that and similar articles is handled here: https://www.citylab.com/life/2017/12...cities/548864/.

In summary: the *defined range* of millennials is getting older. So if millenials were 16-31 five years ago, they're 21-36 now. When you take out 18-20 year olds in university rich places like (flips to terrible article, finds their key examples) Boston and Los Angeles, suddenly the population of millenials "drops" while people in the original 16-31 age range still increases. As millennials age, less of *them* will live in the city (but way more will stay in the city compared to similar age ranges of the previous generation), but the trends for urban livin in the generation behind the millenials stay strong.

There is no there there. No one expected all of the millenials in their twenties to stay in cities. And many of the millenials are leaving not even because they want suburban living, but because city living has become so unaffordable because we haven't built sufficient housing.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16463  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2017, 9:54 PM
Londonee Londonee is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: London
Posts: 1,424
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsarstruck View Post
Every bit of nonsensein that and similar articles is handled here: https://www.citylab.com/life/2017/12...cities/548864/.

In summary: the *defined range* of millennials is getting older. So if millenials were 16-31 five years ago, they're 21-36 now. When you take out 18-20 year olds in university rich places like (flips to terrible article, finds their key examples) Boston and Los Angeles, suddenly the population of millenials "drops" while people in the original 16-31 age range still increases. As millennials age, less of *them* will live in the city (but way more will stay in the city compared to similar age ranges of the previous generation), but the trends for urban livin in the generation behind the millenials stay strong.

There is no there there. No one expected all of the millenials in their twenties to stay in cities. And many of the millenials are leaving not even because they want suburban living, but because city living has become so unaffordable because we haven't built sufficient housing.
yeah, common sense doesn't work well for these arguments... Did some memo get circulated that EVERY millenial in a city will stay for the rest of their lives?!?!

As you suggest nicely, not every millenial who moves to a city will stay...but so long as a *larger percentage* of those who move in stay then in previous generations - and other urban oriented factors remain consistent - then city populations will continue to climb. That's the point.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16464  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2017, 9:02 PM
Gonzo the Great's Avatar
Gonzo the Great Gonzo the Great is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: the Henson Galaxy
Posts: 472
And now for something a little different ..... and before I forget .....

Heres wishing a Merry Christmas to one and all .

.... from Gonzo and friends .
__________________
...... I had that weird dream again !
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16465  
Old Posted Dec 25, 2017, 12:29 PM
Plokoon11 Plokoon11 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 1,589
Merry Christmas and happy holidays to you all! Here's to opening a present of a comcast 3 announcement!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16466  
Old Posted Dec 26, 2017, 5:04 PM
UrbanRevival UrbanRevival is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjv007 View Post
Annual jobs growth rate is not the greatest statistic to use because it fluctuates highly year by year; it also is just one statistic, a very broad one at that. Additionally, because it is a percentage statistic, it has to do with the number of jobs beforehand. It's like in the NFL, if a team is most improved, it doesn't make them the best team. I'll agree that Philly's doing some good things but is it considered a more attractive place to do business than any of the cities you mentioned? I don't think so.
Of course there's no one catch-all measure of local economic activity, but I'd counter to you that the annual job growth measure is a pretty good one. Yes, it does fluctuate from year-to-year, but not as dramatically as you may think.

Also, at this point the phrase "attractive" or "good place" for business has become so overused that that it's lost its meaning, not to mention that it's so nebulous a term that you could argue almost any facet of a place being "attractive" or "not attractive" for business. For example, cities like New York and Boston are going to be much more susceptible to rising sea levels in the coming years? Does that make them more "attractive" for business?

In other words, as the world continues to evolve, factors for being a good place for business have evolved also. And the list of considerations as to where to locate/grow a business is getting longer and longer. The counter-weights to the more "conventional" business destinations are getting "heavier" as well (i.e., tapped-out labor forces, obscene housing costs, infrastructure/population growth mismatch).
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16467  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2017, 5:18 PM
summersm343's Avatar
summersm343 summersm343 is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 12,421
More on potential Gallery Towers

Quote:
Simon isn’t the only mall owner incorporating apartments and other uses beyond retail into their projects. Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust, which is redeveloping the Gallery, has entertained developing apartment towers above the future outlet center. In its third quarter call with analysts, Joe Coradino, CEO of PREIT, said that engineering work and discussions were underway on that front.

“That’s something that would be a real benefit to the project,” Coradino told analysts, saying that apartments create built in customers for the retail center that is now referred to as Fashion District Philadelphia. “Nothing like that exists in Philadelphia."
https://www.bizjournals.com/philadel...-jcpenney.html
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16468  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2017, 5:23 PM
summersm343's Avatar
summersm343 summersm343 is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 12,421
From Fashion District Philadelphia Website:

Only show two towers over the Gallery/Fashion District Mall now. One I believe is apartments at 9th and Market, and one will be a hotel. Most interstingly though, look across the street on Market... looks like towers there centered around the 1000 block of Market.



http://www.fashiondistrictphiladelph...progressphotos
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16469  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2017, 5:25 PM
Knight Hospitaller's Avatar
Knight Hospitaller Knight Hospitaller is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Greater Philadelphia
Posts: 2,159
Adding residential towers to the Gallery makes a lot of sense. Not only does it add a customer base, but the “foundations,“ as it were, are already in place. That has to make the cost of adding towers less expensive then would normally be the case.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16470  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2017, 5:33 PM
summersm343's Avatar
summersm343 summersm343 is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 12,421
Wolf distributes $35M for real estate projects in Philadelphia

Quote:
Pennsylvania has earmarked $35.6 million from its Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program for more than two dozen projects in Philadelphia.

The largest amount, $5 million, was given to Mission First Housing Group for the first phase of a $50 million project called New Market West, which is a is a four-story, 90,000-square-foot building that will house retail space and community services at 5901 Market St. in West Philadelphia.

Another $3 million was approved for the renovation and development of an industrial manufacturing center at the Philadelphia Navy Yard. The facility will accommodate equipment involved in the manufacturing of maritime and defense products.

Dranoff Properties received $1.4 million for its SLS International Hotel & Residences project on South Broad Street. The developer, which also received $1 million last year, had requested $20 million. The project involves the development of 110 hotel rooms and roughly 100 condominiums at Broad and Spruce streets in Center City.

Among those that also received funding were:

-Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, which received $500,000 for the development of a campus master plan;
-Walnut Street Theatre received $1 million for an expansion project;
-Arts & Crafts Holdings received $1.5 million for the redevelopment of 915 Spring Garden St.;
-The Delaware River Waterfront Corp. got $2 million for Spring Garden and Festival Piers;
-Drexel University received $1 million for its Bossone Research Labs.
https://www.bizjournals.com/philadel...sls-hotel.html
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16471  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2017, 6:48 PM
jsbrook jsbrook is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 2,674
Makes perfect sense. This is why they secured permission to demolish the Robinson building. They want to put up a tower on that site.

Quote:
Originally Posted by summersm343 View Post
From Fashion District Philadelphia Website:

Only show two towers over the Gallery/Fashion District Mall now. One I believe is apartments at 9th and Market, and one will be a hotel. Most interstingly though, look across the street on Market... looks like towers there centered around the 1000 block of Market.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16472  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2017, 7:02 PM
summersm343's Avatar
summersm343 summersm343 is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 12,421
More Fashion District retail stores announced

Quote:
When Fashion District Philadelphia – the former Gallery mall – debuts its new look and offerings in the fall of 2018, Wills Eyewear will be in a prime spot.

The Fashion District’s Wills Eyewear store will measure 2,200 square feet. It will sit on the concourse main level of the mall right by bustling Jefferson Station between retailers Hollister and Famous Footwear, while nearby will be H&M, Columbia Sportswear, Bath & Body Works, American Eagle, and Abercrombie & Fitch.
Read more here:
http://www.philly.com/philly/busines...-20171220.html
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16473  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2017, 7:16 PM
Gonzo the Great's Avatar
Gonzo the Great Gonzo the Great is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: the Henson Galaxy
Posts: 472
[QUOTE=summersm343;8029727]From Fashion District Philadelphia Website:

Only show two towers over the Gallery/Fashion District Mall now. One I believe is apartments at 9th and Market, and one will be a hotel. Most interstingly though, look across the street on Market... looks like towers there centered around the 1000 block of Market.



WOW , thats a great " dreamscape " of East Market . The only thing missing now is that 350+ tower for 8th.& Market ... and 1301 Market .... of course ...
__________________
...... I had that weird dream again !
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16474  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2017, 8:13 PM
tsarstruck tsarstruck is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by summersm343 View Post
From Fashion District Philadelphia Website:

Only show two towers over the Gallery/Fashion District Mall now. One I believe is apartments at 9th and Market, and one will be a hotel. Most interstingly though, look across the street on Market... looks like towers there centered around the 1000 block of Market.

http://www.fashiondistrictphiladelph...progressphotos
Is that Swoosh an indication of another anchor tenant?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16475  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2017, 9:05 PM
summersm343's Avatar
summersm343 summersm343 is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 12,421
Philly's port prepares for further growth: Bigger ships, expanded cargoes, new cranes, more jobs

Quote:
At the Port of Philadelphia, two harbor cranes, as large as any in the world, will arrive in early March. The first ship taking used-car exports will leave Philadelphia for Africa next month, and the largest ship ever to sail up the Delaware River will dock here in January with cargo from South America.

Work will wrap up soon to strengthen ship berths at the Packer Avenue Marine Terminal. The design of new warehouses at the former Philadelphia Produce and Seafood Terminal will be completed and go out to bid. Ground will be broken on a 100,000-square-foot warehouse at the Tioga Marine Terminal in Port Richmond. Building a vehicle-processing center for Hyundai and Kia imports is also expected to begin at the Southport terminal at the Navy Yard.

“Construction of the warehousing improvements will all be done in 2018, a really significant growth expansion process,” said Gregory Iannarelli, senior director of business development and chief counsel for the port, known as PhilaPort.

Sounds like a busy 2018. It follows on the heels of a bang-up 2017 at the port, which saw more containerized freight, more cars, more cargoes such as wood pulp, and the promise of those larger cranes, capable of unloading larger ships.

The first two cranes, as big as any in New York Harbor, are on their way from Shanghai, China. Port officials recently announced the $23.5 million purchase of two additional New Panamax-size container gantry cranes, which will arrive in April 2019 and enable Philadelphia to double container cargo volumes and create jobs.

The changes came after the Wolf administration pledged $300 million, the first major capital investment in four decades for terminal improvements, wharves, warehouses, and cranes. The state is landlord and owner of 16 piers and terminals on the Delaware River.

PhilaPort, which leases and manages the piers and terminals, spent $10 million in June to buy the former Produce and Seafood Terminal from Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp. The 29-acre parcel at Third Street and Pattison Avenue will be used to relocate warehouses and increase container capacity at Packer Avenue.

All these improvements at the port are expected to create up to 2,000 waterfront jobs, and nearly 7,000 total jobs for truckers, rail workers, suppliers, and port-related businesses over the next decade.

“Right now, we can’t build fast enough,” said port CEO Jeff Theobald. “We have to get through this construction as quickly as possible to get those jobs going. And then move on to Phase Two. Clearly, we need more warehouse space. We’re trying to look at properties available.”

Holt Logistics, which operates the Packer terminal for PhilaPort, has shifted empty containers, chassis, and other equipment from the main yard to a 45-acre lot next door, increasing space at the dock. Containerized cargoes are up about 20 percent over last year, said Eric Holt, vice president of sales and marketing.

“The goal right now is to free up as much terminal operating area as possible, because the number of containers has grown to the point where, if we don’t, we’re going to become congested,” Holt said.

Instead of retrofitting an existing terminal at Tioga, port officials shifted gears and decided to add 100,000 square feet of “food grade” warehouse space for wood-pulp shipments. Fibria Celulose, the world’s largest producer of eucalyptus pulp, sends 400,000 tons of pulp from Brazil to Tioga annually. A second pulp customer, CMPC Celulosa, also ships to Tioga, and now other wood-pulp producers want to come, too.

With the 103-mile deepening of the Delaware River navigation channel to 45 feet from 40 feet, begun in 2010, nearly completed, bigger ships are coming to Philadelphia through the expanded Panama Canal.

Next month, the largest ship ever to sail up the Delaware — a vessel 11,000 TEUs operated by Mediterranean Shipping Co. — is scheduled to bring cargo from Chile and Peru, port officials said.

More than 154,000 new Hyundai and Kia vehicles arrived at the port from South Korea as of Nov. 30, headed to dealer showrooms. The state will invest $93 million at the Southport site to build a new processing center and provide additional acreage for autos.

In January, a twice-monthly shipping service will take used-car exports from Philadelphia to Tema, Ghana; Cotonou, Benin; and Lagos, Nigeria, Iannarelli said. The first ship, MV Glovis Cosmos, is due to load cars on Jan. 10.

Looking to the future, the port’s chief executive wants to develop a ship berth on 30 to 40 acres and 2,000 feet of waterfront at the eastern end of the Navy Yard. It would be welcome news to the International Longshoremen’s Association and others, who have long wanted a marine terminal at Southport.
Read more here:
http://www.philly.com/philly/busines...-20171228.html
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16476  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2017, 9:27 PM
City Wide City Wide is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 1,028
Quote:
Originally Posted by Knight Hospitaller View Post
Adding residential towers to the Gallery makes a lot of sense. Not only does it add a customer base, but the “foundations,“ as it were, are already in place. That has to make the cost of adding towers less expensive then would normally be the case.

Plus the land has already been paid for. But when one thinks how long it takes many buildings to dig and then get out of the hole, such as endless dig at "W", I've got to believe that starting this project 5 floors up in the air would be a huge bonus/savings over other similar projects. And like the man said, you are building in a customer base for the stores

Another plus factor for this to happen besides the above is that the whole construction process should be shortened which would mean the owners should be able to start collecting rents and paying off their loans that much faster then a project built on raw dirt.

On the minus side, these guys might not have any experience building residential--------

Last edited by City Wide; Dec 28, 2017 at 3:42 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16477  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2017, 9:31 PM
JohnIII JohnIII is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 223
This is very intriguing news.

Philly will now have a Fashion District; far from what we've had before. Up to this point the Fashion District was the Garment District on 4th Street; this is very good for business with huge potential as far as marketing the city is concern.

The Gallery building will have 2 towers; which isn't a shock and is very good news however the 2 towers aren't where I thought they would be. The tower on between 8th and 9th is a shock; I never knew that part of the gallery could support it but if they can make it work great!

From what I remember Gallery when they built the building it had 2 podiums; one at 10th and Market Street; and the other at 10th and Filbert Street. By the picture above they are only currently showing a tower at 10th and Filbert which looks to be about 34 floors but none at 10th and Market. I wonder if a future tower is planned at 10th and Market if the project is profitable?

If these towers are built as well as the one at 10th and Market on the south side of Market; the Robinson Building and the Lit Brothers Tower; it will drastically expend the skyline east to 7th street in a solid and drastic way; with good height.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16478  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2017, 9:41 PM
JohnIII JohnIII is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 223
So the crane for the Port of Philadelphia are about to be built and the river dredging is complete. This is good news for the city; great news; this means they may be bringing ships in excess to 110,000 tons up the river I beat; that's bigger then most Navy Super Carriers.

I wonder if they will add more cranes; the largest fresh water port on the East Coast; it may be justified really fast.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16479  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2017, 11:42 PM
SEFTA's Avatar
SEFTA SEFTA is offline
PhillyPholly
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 424
This is very exciting.

East Market

This was the old plan proposed. It seems they're sticking to the plan. The fact they have a new rendering showing only 2 towers tells me they are already planning on moving ahead. The third tower is prepared for but may come along later. The development on the south side of Market is a surprise. I'd truthfully like to see more height there, but this is exciting.
Gallery
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16480  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2017, 11:49 PM
jjv007 jjv007 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 652
these are still a couple or so years down the road minimum, correct? ^^
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > City Compilations
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 5:52 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.