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  #101  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2019, 5:38 PM
_Matt _Matt is offline
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Originally Posted by KevinFromTexas View Post
I think your concern here is that the concrete strip will be visible from the south over the top of the Hotel ZaZa, which is 24 floors, while this strip of concrete on this tower is 30 floors. However, the Hotel ZaZa is 305 feet tall, while the concrete strip is 307 feet high. That's going to be a pretty dense block with three high rises on it, and it's fairly unlikely that the concrete strip will be all that visible from the south. The "best view" of it will likely be from the southwest if you're far enough away, you might see it above the roof of The Plaza Lofts adjacent to it. I don't think it'll be visible at all from the south or southeast since it'll basically the same height as the Hotel ZaZa.

The 30th floor of this building will be 307 feet 2 inches, according to the elevations.
Thanks for the actual elevation numbers, which indeed suggest that the concrete wall was incorporated to match the hotel across the alley.

Actually, rather than concern, I think it is a nice touch to take into account the building's surroundings.


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My guess would be that it has to do with the percentage of allowable glass based on fire code.
This is an interesting theory as well. Maybe we will never know!
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  #102  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2019, 3:01 PM
Austin_ez_wider Austin_ez_wider is offline
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Originally Posted by _Matt View Post
The south elevation shows a large section of painted concrete up to about floor 30 (I can't read the elevation).

Immediately south of the building is an alley and then Hotel ZaZa, which has only 24 floors.

So the concrete section doesn't align in height or really match the north face of ZaZa since ZaZa has a cutout in the middle.

So, why do they have a large swatch of the building covered in concrete instead of glass?


Its probably a structural element. Due to the ratio of height to the size of the base, the structure requires a shear wall. 5th & West has 2 exposed.
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  #103  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2019, 3:50 PM
Azul Azul is offline
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Originally Posted by Austin_ez_wider View Post
Its probably a structural element. Due to the ratio of height to the size of the base, the structure requires a shear wall. 5th & West has 2 exposed.
I don't want to say you're wrong but this building looks like it would have a typical concrete shear core with possible steel bracing around the exterior as it's primary lateral system. For a fairly simple structural I'm certain the structural team could make a number of more aesthetic solutions that don't involve an exposed concrete wall like this - it likely stemmed from a decision on the architect/developers end.

Where you could be right though is that the decision was made early on that this wall would exist and the engineers decided to then integrate it into their lateral system, but I'm confident it wasn't the other way around.
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  #104  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2019, 4:35 PM
Austin_ez_wider Austin_ez_wider is offline
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Originally Posted by Azul View Post
this building looks like it would have a typical concrete shear core with possible steel bracing around the exterior as it's primary lateral system.


I don't think there are any high rises downtown using steel bracing? All of our tall buildings are concrete structures.
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  #105  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2019, 5:31 PM
Azul Azul is offline
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Originally Posted by Austin_ez_wider View Post
I don't think there are any high rises downtown using steel bracing? All of our tall buildings are concrete structures.
There's several! You're right that there's a lot of solely concrete based structures around downtown but as we're getting taller we're starting to see more hybrid structures. I think the Spring (?) uses just interior concrete shear walls for it's lateral system but then there's the Independent that has a concrete core with steel outriggers connected from it to the extremities of the building.

You could be correct about this building and I think my post was potentially wrong/misled, but my main point is I have a hard time thinking an engineer got away with putting a shearwall on the exterior like that. I think the developer knew that another building will butt-up next to it at some point and just elected to cheap out on that area. Again, I could be wrong but I do enjoy speculating about the actual design process of these new buildings
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  #106  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2019, 3:48 PM
Austin_ez_wider Austin_ez_wider is offline
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Originally Posted by Azul View Post
There's several! You're right that there's a lot of solely concrete based structures around downtown but as we're getting taller we're starting to see more hybrid structures. I think the Spring (?) uses just interior concrete shear walls for it's lateral system but then there's the Independent that has a concrete core with steel outriggers connected from it to the extremities of the building.

You could be correct about this building and I think my post was potentially wrong/misled, but my main point is I have a hard time thinking an engineer got away with putting a shearwall on the exterior like that. I think the developer knew that another building will butt-up next to it at some point and just elected to cheap out on that area. Again, I could be wrong but I do enjoy speculating about the actual design process of these new buildings
I have been building in Austin for several years and there are no tall hybrid structures here. They are all concrete framed structures with steel accessories like metal stair cases or in the The Independent's case implemented tension bars but only for the comfort of the residences, its was not required.

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...5&postcount=46

Step into the time machine and check out the post above with pictures of Spring under construction in 2008. I didn't know but it appears that they have a exposed concrete shear wall on two sides of their building as well.
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