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  #901  
Old Posted Oct 15, 2006, 7:59 PM
Nowhereman1280 Nowhereman1280 is offline
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If it was a main road, with stop lights and all, then it definately was North Ave. If it was a smaller side street with a old little wall on the south side then a new fence after you cross Humbolt, then it was Resevoir/ Glover heading towards the North Ave. Park. I find that one of the best skyline-viewing walks in Milwaukee. That and walking onto the pedestrian bridge over mckinley.
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  #902  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2006, 2:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eriol
I like the view from the Hoan Bridge best.
It's a great view, especially coming up over the Hoan...but, I think that darn US Bank looks too dominating from this view, making the rest of the skyline look...well, paltry. I mean, USB is all you see - boom, right there in your face coming up over the rise. If the skyline was more condensed, this would be a tremendous view. I think the best skyline shot is immediately north of Pabst looking east/southeast. Unfortunately, there is no inclusion of water in this view, river or lake - two of our biggest assets.
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  #903  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2006, 4:59 PM
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Speaking of the North Avenue Reservoir, that is supposed to be getting redone along with Kilbourn Park. It should have started by now. Has anyone seen anything going on there?

The plans can be seen here:

http://www.water.mpw.net/kilbourn1_06.htm
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  #904  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2006, 5:15 PM
Nowhereman1280 Nowhereman1280 is offline
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Well they closed down North Ave. and redid that nicely this summer. Perhaps that was the first stage in redoing the reservoir? I think I saw some nice new crosswalks installed across the road up there or something last time I was up there.
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  #905  
Old Posted Oct 18, 2006, 12:34 AM
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I had always thought the North Avenue closure was to work on the park, but I haven't been on North since it reopened (in fact, I avoided it until now because I thought it was still closed) but I can't imagine why they'd close that specific section of North Avenue if it wasn't for the park. The rehabbing should be under way now...that'll be a fantastic park.

I still wish they could've found some way to incorporate a body of water into the grande scheme...it would've made for a nice, shallow reflecting pool sort of thing to pay homage to the old reservoir and add to the park itself, but nonetheless I'm excited to see this improvement to Riverwest.

It'd be really cool to see some decorative little pedestrian bridges over North Avenue to connect the South end of the park to the staircases, but now I'm just daydreaming.
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  #906  
Old Posted Oct 25, 2006, 9:56 PM
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* moderator Edit *

Redd, please do your ranting elsewhere, this thread is about milwaukee development.

Last edited by Steely Dan; Oct 25, 2006 at 10:11 PM.
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  #907  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2006, 1:16 AM
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Fresh!

Redevelopment project seeks city aid

A $21 million redevelopment project, including improvements to one of downtown Milwaukee's oldest office buildings, would receive around $3 million in city financial assistance under a proposal unveiled today.

The city funds would help finance renovations at a 295,000-square-foot office building at 735 N. Water St. and a nearby riverwalk. Compass Properties LLC plans to make improvements to the building, and convert an adjacent 80,000-square-foot building, at 731 N. Water St., into condominiums and a parking structure.

The 16-story building at 735 N. Water St. was completed in 1913 as the headquarters for First Wisconsin National Bank, which was later known as Firstar Bank before it acquired US Bancorp. and took its name. It is now leased to various office tenants. The adjacent eight-story building, built in 1962 as an annex to the First Wisconsin building, has been vacant for more than 15 years.

Both buildings are owned by Compass Properties LLC.

Compass said earlier this year that it wants to convert the entire ground floor and the eastern half of the upper floors at 731 N. Water into a parking structure, providing additional parking spaces for 735 N. Water tenants. That would help draw more businesses to 735 N. Water, which has lost tenants in recent years to newer downtown buildings.

The western half of 731 N. Water, which overlooks the Milwaukee River, would be converted into condominiums, with one unit on each of the seven upper floors, under Compass' tentative plans. Selling those residential units, each with about 3,500 square feet, would generate cash to help pay for the parking structure.

Compass wants to begin working on the buildings next year. The firm wants the parking structure to be completed by the end of 2007, when much of the Marquette Interchange reconstruction will be done. Compass anticipates a burst of interest from suburban businesses seeking to move downtown once that project is done.

Under the city financing proposal, Compass would recover $2.9 million from the city to help pay for renovation expenses, and improvements to the buildings' adjacent riverwalk. That city costs could be as high as $3.4 million, with the higher amount including a contingency fund.

The city funding plan will be reviewed Thursday by the Redevelopment Authority board. It requires Common Council approval.


Making the ground floor into parking is lame!
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  #908  
Old Posted Nov 15, 2006, 3:34 AM
Nowhereman1280 Nowhereman1280 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eriol

Making the ground floor into parking is lame!
Yes, I agree completely with you, but suburban bussinesses moving downtown is not lame, that's for sure!
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  #909  
Old Posted Nov 22, 2006, 8:27 PM
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An update on a couple of hotel projects...

Weas Development will be seeking some tax incremental financing from the City for its proposed mixed-use hotel project in the Third Ward. The proposal includes a Renaissance ClubSport hotel (165 rooms), a health club (80,000 sqft), street-level retail (13,000 sqft), and a parking garage (450 cars) in a 14-story buiilding at the southeast corner of E. St Paul Avenue and N. Broadway.

The original proposal was for a 17-story building which also had 40 condos, but those plans were scaled back due to zoning conflicts. However, the scaled down version will still be a significant enhancement that introduces brand new uses to the already successful Third Ward neighborhood.

The Developers will be seeking some assistance from the City in the form of tax incremental financing to help cover some of the costs for the project. They hope to begin construction by March 2007 and have the building completed by Fall 2008-Spring 2009.


A few blocks to the north, Development Opportunity Corp. plans to break ground in early December for a mixed-use hotel/retail/condo project at the southeast corner of N. Water Street and E. Juneau Avenue in Downtown. The 12-story development consists of a Staybridge Suites hotel (125 rooms), street-level retail (17,000 sqft), and condos (30 units).

From the Small Business Times: Real Estate Weekly, 11-22-06
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  #910  
Old Posted Nov 22, 2006, 8:56 PM
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Some good news from today's paper for the Park East area, though I'm not exactly sure what "proposed" means, hopefully its more of a for-sure thing than just a proposal


From the Journal-Sentinal 22 November 2006:

$8.2 million in city funding proposed for The North End
City proposes financing for Park East project
By TOM DAYKIN

The Department of City Development proposed Tuesday $8.2 million in city financing for a housing and retail development just north of downtown - paving the way for what would be the largest project within Milwaukee's Park East area. The city's funds would help finance Mandel Group Inc.'s $175 million project, known as The North End. The development is planned for 8 acres overlooking the Milwaukee River, on the former Pfister & Vogel tannery site.

Mandel plans to create 395 condos, 88 apartments and 20,000 to 25,000 square feet of street-level retail space over the next five to seven years. The firm hopes to begin demolition and environmental cleanup work in December, with new construction beginning by next summer, said Richard Lincoln, Mandel senior vice president.

The North End's $65 million first phase would feature 109 condos, 88 apartments and 12,500 square feet of retail space in six separate buildings, some as high as 10 floors, and include a two-level parking garage. Construction on that phase, south of E. Pleasant St., between the river and N. Water St., would take 18 to 24 months to complete.

The city funds, which require Common Council approval, would help pay for demolition and environmental cleanup work; new streets, a riverwalk and other public improvements, and other expenses. Lincoln said the funds, which the city would borrow, would be repaid by The North End's property taxes within seven to 10 years, according to a study commissioned by the Department of City Development.

The financing plan will be reviewed Tuesday by the Common Council's Zoning, Neighborhoods and Development Committee.

The North End would amount to a huge investment for the city's 64-acre Park East redevelopment area. That area includes privately owned parcels, and 16 acres of county-owned parcels left vacant when the former Park East Freeway was demolished.

The former freeway stub's demolition was completed in 2003. That was followed by delays on selling the county-owned parcels until a debate was resolved over whether to create certain conditions for developers. That included a requirement that they pay prevailing union wages for construction work on county-owned parcels.

That matter was resolved in February 2005, when the County Board overrode County Executive Scott Walker's veto of those development guidelines. The marketing of the county-owned parcels began shortly thereafter.

There are two major projects in the development stage on the county-owned lands.

Chicago-based RSC & Associates plans to develop apartments, retail space and two hotels on two blocks bordered by N. Jefferson St., N. Broadway, E. Lyon St. and E. Ogden Ave. Also, Ruvin Development Inc. and Dallas-based Gatehouse Capital Corp. plan to build a hotel, condos, offices and retail space on a block bordered by N. Old World 3rd and N. 4th streets and W. Juneau and W. McKinley avenues.

Projects on privately owned parcels include The Flatiron, a 38-unit condo building under construction at 1541 N. Jefferson St.

The nation's slowdown in the housing market has not affected demand for downtown condos, Lincoln said.

Mandel has received around 150 inquiries about The North End, even though the firm has not yet launched a marketing campaign, Lincoln said.

Some of The North End condos will be smaller units, priced as low as $165,000 to $175,000. Most of the units will likely sell for $350,000 to $375,000, Lincoln said.

The city financing plan is not the only public funding for The North End.

Mandel is receiving a $1.1 million low-interest city loan, funded by federal grants, to help with the environmental cleanup. The project also landed a $900,000 state cleanup grant.

The site is the largest polluted parcel in the downtown area, according to Mandel Group. The previous owner, U.S. Leather Inc., went bankrupt, abruptly closed the tannery six years ago, and cannot be billed for the cleanup costs, said Barry Mandel, Mandel Group president. Mandel bought the former tannery in 2001 for $3.4 million.

http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=534049
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  #911  
Old Posted Nov 22, 2006, 9:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nowhereman1280
Some good news from today's paper for the Park East area, though I'm not exactly sure what "proposed" means, hopefully its more of a for-sure thing than just a proposal


From the Journal-Sentinal 22 November 2006:

$8.2 million in city funding proposed for The North End
City proposes financing for Park East project
DCD is proposing (or recommending) that the City should work out a plan to provide $8.2 million (through tax incrememental financing) to help the developers finance their development proposal. That has to be approved by the Common Council, as explained right there in the article.
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  #912  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2006, 4:36 PM
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Some great news for the Ruvin project and the city as a whole:

Luxury hotel called boost for downtown
San Francisco-based chain to use Sydney Hih site
By TOM DAYKIN
tdaykin@journalsentinel.com
Posted: Dec. 20, 2006
Kimpton Hotels, known for its luxury boutique hotels in Chicago, New York and other cities, will operate a new hotel planned for Milwaukee's Park East area - which could greatly elevate the downtown hospitality market.

Kimpton was named operator for a 180-room hotel planned as part of a $104 million mixed-use development. That project, which includes condominiums, offices and shops, will be developed on the mostly vacant block bordered by N. Old World 3rd and N. 4th streets, and W. Juneau and W. McKinley avenues.

The hotel will incorporate the Sydney Hih building, which is located on the site, and the former Gipfel brewery, which local developer Robert Ruvin plans to move to the block and renovate.

Ruvin and Dallas-based Gatehouse Capital Corp. plan to begin construction on the mixed-use development by late 2007. The County Board agreed in September to sell the parcel to Ruvin and Gatehouse, which have since been conducting soil tests and lining up financing for the project.

Open by 2009
San Francisco-based Kimpton, which operates 43 hotels, plans to have the Milwaukee hotel open by late 2009, said Jim Alderman, senior vice president for acquisitions and development.

Alderman said Wednesday that the hotel, which is yet unnamed, will carry all of the Kimpton hallmarks: luxurious furnishings, an "intense" level of customer service and rates that occupy the upper end of the market. He said the average daily rate will likely be over $180.

Kimpton's hotels include three Chicago properties: Hotel Monaco, Hotel Burnham and Hotel Allegro. Alderman said Kimpton is expanding rapidly because of heavy demand from its customers who travel extensively, especially for business.

"We now are starting to extend our reach a little beyond the core cities," Alderman said.

San Francisco-based Kimpton has 10 hotels under construction, and 15 more projects - including the Milwaukee property - in the development pipeline.

High-end niche
Milwaukee, Alderman said, has plenty of hotel rooms but "not a lot of high-end boutique" rooms. He said Kimpton will fill that niche, and said other high-end operators are considering the downtown market.

Plans by Manpower Inc. to move its global headquarters from Glendale to downtown is among the positive developments that are drawing attention from high-end hotel operators, Alderman said. He also praised the downtown night life, and compared its restaurants and clubs to those in Chicago and Dallas.

"I was actually shocked to see how lively your night scene is in Milwaukee," Alderman said. "It's all building up to having a hotel match up with them."

Kimpton's commitment to the project "brings a whole new dynamic to downtown Milwaukee," said Greg Hanis, a hotel industry consultant based in Pewaukee.

"Wow! That's stunning," Hanis said upon hearing the news.

Kimpton is well known for running high-end hotels, said Hanis, who operates Hospitality Marketers Inc. He said a Kimpton in downtown Milwaukee would be "a leap" above the current high-end operators, which include the Pfister Hotel, Hotel Metro and Hyatt Regency Milwaukee.

Hanis said the Kimpton will market itself to corporate travelers drawn by such companies as Manpower, Rockwell Inc. and Harley-Davidson Inc. He said local businesses looking to impress clients will pay for their rooms at the Kimpton property.

20-story development
The hotel will be the centerpiece of the 20-story Ruvin/Gatehouse development. Gatehouse has developed other high-end hotels, including a Joule Hotel in Dallas that is operated by Kimpton.

"Kimpton is the first brand of many to be revealed for this project," said Marty Collins, Gatehouse chief executive officer, in a statement. Other brands, he said, will be tied to the project's ground-floor retail, restaurant, bar, fitness center and a "rooftop entertainment venue."

Kimpton's hotels tend to have different names in different cities. In New York, its properties include the Muse Hotel, and in Boston, it operates the Nine Zero Hotel.

Might the Milwaukee hotel by named for the Sydney Hih Building, or the former Gipfel brewery?

"We're not sure," Ruvin said. "But we promise it will be interesting."

Other projects
The Ruvin/Gatehouse project's preliminary plans include 70 condos, 55,000 square feet of offices and a 330-car parking structure.

It is among several big developments moving forward in the 64-acre Park East area, which includes 16 acres made available after the former Park East Freeway was razed.

The Common Council last week approved city financial assistance for The North End, a $175 million project with nearly 500 housing units planned for the site of the former Pfister & Vogel tannery, which will be demolished.

The council also approved funding for the planned $205 million transformation of the former Pabst brewery into housing, offices and shops. The Pabst site is technically outside the Park East area. But the redevelopment area's western border abuts the Pabst property.

Other projects include Park East Square, a plan for hotels, apartments and stores on two empty blocks bordered by N. Jefferson St., N. Broadway, E. Lyon St. and E. Ogden Ave.
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  #913  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2006, 3:43 AM
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more on the ruvin development from this month's Heartland Real Estate Business Journal:

MIXED-USE EXPLOSION
Entering 2007, mixed-use developments continue to be the commercial venture of choice in the Midwest.

Amy Bigley

With the New Year quickly approaching, development abounds in the Midwest. The interest in mixed-use development continues as projects are popping up in cities across the Heartland, such as Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Louis and Minneapolis. While some are the traditional mix of residential, retail and office, others are sharply tailored to the location and provide products for specific demographics and individuals. Here’s a glimpse of what is to come in 2007.

600,000-Square-Foot Mixed-Use Project; Milwaukee

Dallas-based Gatehouse Capital Corporation, along with Milwaukee-based Ruvin Development, is currently developing the first hospitality-centered, urban mixed-use project in Milwaukee. The $150 million, 20-story hotel-anchored project, which is currently unnamed, will encompass an entire city block between 3rd and 4th streets and McKinley and Juneau avenues.

Even though Milwaukee may be seen as a feeder market to Chicago by a small number of people, it is a legitimate market in its own right and a great market for urban mixed-use projects, notes Marty Collins, president/CEO of Gatehouse Capital Corporation. “Many people live downtown, compared to the city’s overall size, and it has a quickly recovering economy with a modern tradition and a lot of redemptive reuse.”

The 600,000-square-foot project includes a 175-room, high-end boutique hotel, 100,000 square feet of office space, 50 condominiums, a high-end restaurant and a national bar/lounge, as well as a variety of retail including approximately 20,000 square feet of neighborhood-oriented retail and a 450-vehicle parking garage.

“The project serves a niche market that is unfilled in Milwaukee,” Collins says. “[Gatehouse] has a history of going into areas that are essentially brownfield and leading the revitalization of those neighborhoods.”

The project will offer a variety of products and brands to serve the needs of its customers. Collins explains that Gatehouse focuses on psychographics instead of targeting a specific class or demographic. “Our customers are urban, gay/straight, men/women, young/old and tend to be affluent, early movers and modern more than traditional,” Collins notes.

Gilbane Building Company is set to begin construction on the project in late 2007, with delivery slated for fourth-quarter 2009. Dallas-based HKS, Inc. is providing the architectural services for the project, while Milwaukee-based Johnsen Schmaling Architects is designing the interior of the condominiums. The developers have retained CB Richard Ellis to market the project.
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  #914  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2007, 4:01 AM
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New Brookfield Square

Another mall makeover in works
Brookfield Square revamp sought to fight competition


By DORIS HAJEWSKI
dhajewski@journalsentinel.com
Posted: Jan. 5, 2007

Brookfield - Facing intensified competition from area shopping centers, the owners of Brookfield Square plan to transform the mall in what is likely its biggest renovation since it opened in 1967.

Brookfield Square's owners plan to add a two-story main entry and a landscaped drop-off area. The renovation will also touch on the food court, which would include a large, circular fireplace.

The plans presented to local officials call for an exterior and interior renovation that will give the mall a more upscale identity, with a streetscape and new canopied entrance at the east side.

The plans also show a new restaurant, Johnny Rockets, to be added to an expanded food court on the west side of the mall, and a small, unspecified retail store to be added to the east side.

The restaurant would be the first location in Wisconsin for Johnny Rockets, a 1950s-style hamburger chain based in California.

CBL & Associates Properties Inc., Brookfield Square's owner, hopes to start work on the project in the spring and finish in September 2008. In addition, four new previously announced restaurants and an upscale grocer, Fresh Market, are scheduled to open this year.

No price tag was available for the multimillion-dollar renovation project.

The proposal, which goes before the Brookfield Plan Commission on Monday, comes as competition heats up among area retail centers. The most recent development has been the conversion of the Bayshore Town Center in Glendale, which offers residents of the North Shore a convenient alternative to driving west for stores that previously had no locations on the east side of the metro area.

But Brookfield Square will face even more pressure from the west when General Growth Properties Inc., which owns and operates Mayfair Mall in Wauwatosa, builds a new shopping center in Oconomowoc in a few years. General Growth's Pabst Farms project is going through the approval process with the City of Oconomowoc.

"CBL's renovation of Brookfield Square, and the addition of four restaurants, is designed to enhance the shopping experience for our customers," said Michael Lebovitz, chief development officer. "Since retail is an evolving industry, a renovation is essential to keeping pace with the ever-growing market.

"With this renovation and new development projects, Brookfield Square will remain a source of pride for the community and will continue to be a premier shopping destination in southeastern Wisconsin."

Exterior, interior facelifts
The most dramatic aspects of the Brookfield Square renovation are the two-story main entry and the complete renovation of the food court, which will include a large, circular fireplace.

Drivers will be able to drop off passengers under cover at the main entry, which will be flanked by rustic stone pillars and landscaped with a fountain, flowers and bushes.

The food court will get carpeting and a soft seating area, with sofas and chairs arranged around the fireplace.

The entire mall will get new flooring and lighting, and the center court will get a water feature and a Starbucks cafe.

The renovation plan is being submitted to the city four years after Brookfield hired a consultant who recommended a much larger project, calling for the addition of more than 200,000 square feet of retail space, including a new anchor store, three residential developments and a parking deck. Those plans never materialized.

At the time, city officials said they feared the mall would fall behind competitively if it didn't expand and update its look.

Under previous owners, Brookfield Square was slow to change, relying instead for years on its premier location on the busy Blue Mound Road retail corridor. For example, Brookfield Square was the last area mall to add a food court, in the late 1990s.

CBL bought the mall from the Richard E. Jacobs Group of Cleveland in 2001 for $1.3 billion. CBL also owns malls in Janesville, Madison, Racine and Wausau that it acquired as part of that deal.
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  #915  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2007, 4:15 AM
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Southridge is next, it looks.
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  #916  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2007, 1:10 AM
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DOC Development plans to break ground on its mixed-use hotel/retail/condo project later this month. The site is located on the southeast corner of N. Water Street and E. Juneau Avenue, adjacent to the Park East corridor in Downtown. The project includes a Staybridge Suites hotel (125 rooms), street-level retail (17,000 sqft), condos (30 units), and a parking garage.



^ Daytime and nighttime renderings of the Staybridge Suites mixed-use development.


***

Weas Development continues to make plans for a significant mixed-use development in the Third Ward. The site is located on the southeast corner of N Broadway and E. St. Paul Avenue, kitty-corner from the Milwaukee Public Market. It is planned to include a Renaissance ClubSport hotel (165 rooms), a health club (80,000 sqft), street-level retail (13,000 sqft), and a parking garage (450 cars). Weas is in the process of seeking finances for the project and tweaking the design.


^ A rendering showing the view of the Broadway/St. Paul corner.


^ A rendering showing how the building fits on the block in between existing historic buildings. This view shows the N. Milwaukee Street (left) and E. St. Paul Avenue (right) facades.


***

Here are some updated renderings of the Ovation Plaza mixed-use proposal. The development keeps getting scaled back due to the difficulty of finding any anchor tenants...thus the proposal is still purely speculative at this point. Ovation Plaza is proposed for the block currently occupied by the Marcus Center parking structure on the block bounded by N. Water, E. State, N. Edison Streets and E. Highland Avenue.


^ A rendering of Ovation Plaza showing the tower along E. State Street and parking garage along N. Edison Street. The parking garage could be used by the Marcus Center and Ovation Plaza tenants.


^ This rendering shows the main facade along N. Water Street from the corner of E. Highland Avenue. The parking garage is placed behind a "liner" layer of street-level retail space.


***

NAI MLG Development has been working on a mixed-use proposal that combines a County-owned site and a privately-owned site on a prominent piece of land in the Park East corridor. The proposal is located along the eastern bank of the Milwaukee River between E. Knapp, N. Water, and E. Cherry Streets. Specific contents of the proposal do not seem to have been reported yet, nor has it been scheduled for any approvals/disapprovals yet. Nor has a name been released yet, so it is being referred to as "Block 12" for now.


^ A rendering showing the view looking up N. Water Street. The tower terminates the view corridor as the street bends around to the northeast.


^ An bird's-eye rendering of the Block 12 proposal showing how the overall development fits within the bend in the river. The low-rise piece along Knapp/Water is connected to the high-rise piece along Water/Cherry.


***

The Pleasant Street Market has been proposed for a while already as a small retail anchor for the southern end of the Beerline corridor. It will be located along E. Pleasant Street, between the Milwaukee River and N. Commerce Street. The project will include an upscale grocery store as well as other small shops and a new RiverWalk section.


^ A nighttime rendering of the Pleasant Street Market as seen from the Pleasant Street Bridge. The building will open up onto a new segment of RiverWalk.


^ Another nighttime rendering of the retail development looking at the corner of Commerce/Pleasant.
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  #917  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2007, 4:36 AM
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^ great update mark!

that block 12 proposal looks very promising. i especially like the way it terminates the view corridor in the rendering you posted. and the staybridges looks like a nice clean straightfowrad design, nothing groundbreaking, but not every building needs to be.
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  #918  
Old Posted Jan 15, 2007, 12:58 AM
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Holy cow, how did I miss these? looks like I've got some diagram work to do. Block 12 is such a great way to terminate Water Street. it really looks like Water just kind of dies off from around Red Arrow Park.

By the way, I'm starting to notice some running themes in proposed architecture around here: Does anyone notice the similarities between the US Bank sister tower, Block 12, and the new Ovation Plaza? And for that matter, University Club, the Art Museum and Pier Wisconsin?
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Last edited by CGII; Jan 15, 2007 at 1:05 AM.
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  #919  
Old Posted Jan 15, 2007, 7:46 AM
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Originally Posted by CGII View Post
Holy cow, how did I miss these? looks like I've got some diagram work to do.
You may want to hold off on that before devoting too much time in them. With the exception of the Staybridge, and perhaps the Pleasant Street Market, none of the other designs are final...they may get taller, they may get shorter, they may be reconfigured...they are still being tweaked...
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  #920  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2007, 3:37 PM
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Block 12

I think we need to focus EVERYTHING to making sure the block 12 proposal gets built. The angle it sits at and it's height are perfect for anchoring that corner of downtown. And if we want people to move into the Park East (which I'm pretty sure we do) we need to give them a visual reason to go there. Someone else already mentioned how Water St just kind of dies off as it goes north. I completely agree. I think it's more important that this gets built than Lake Point and ClubSport simply because it's visually appealing. And while economic impact on a city usually beats out visual impact, I think it's time we took a big risk and got this erected.
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