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  #10101  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2017, 3:08 PM
YannickTO YannickTO is offline
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Neither are Orleans or Barrhaven, but I guess the strip of grass between them and the contiguous urban part of Ottawa is a teeny bit narrower than the one that keeps Kanata apart.
Perfect example.
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  #10102  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2017, 3:15 PM
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They are a tiny bit narrower indeed, but I agree this is nonsense. You could take the narrowest section of the greenbelt to the north between the Kanata North Technology Park and the Crystal Beach residential neigbourhood and that would be pretty similar to the greenbelt's width between Ottawa and Barrhaven/Orleans. Hell if you count Bells Corners you wouldn't even need to do that.


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  #10103  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2017, 3:57 PM
YannickTO YannickTO is offline
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I found another example that bugs me. Salaberry-de-Valleyfield is considered its own metro/urban area ... but right across the water, there's two urban areas named Les Coteaux and Les Cèdres, and these two are part of Montreal CMA. Which baffles me... knowing the region, I'm pretty sure a lot of people from Coteaux/Cedres area travel to Valleyfield for many different reasons. They're much closer to Valleyfield than Montreal area. Maybe they travel/shop to Saint-Lazare, which is really a part of Montreal CMA, but I find the whole thing suspicious.

Edit: I made a mistake earlier by saying Okotoks was included within Calgary's Metro/Urban stats. It is not. It still has its own metro/urban stats. My bad.

Last edited by YannickTO; Oct 11, 2017 at 4:23 PM. Reason: typos
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  #10104  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2017, 3:57 PM
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What are those green arrows supposed to represent? Green belt connections?
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  #10105  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2017, 4:54 PM
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Originally Posted by harls View Post
What are those green arrows supposed to represent? Green belt connections?
"Ecological corridors". I see one going from Shirley's Bay to the Gatineau Park (which doesn't even touch the river), that doesn't make much sense as a connection.
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  #10106  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2017, 5:05 PM
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Quote:
Salaberry-de-Valleyfield
is one of the stranger names for a municipality in Quebec.
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  #10107  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2017, 5:25 PM
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Originally Posted by MolsonExport View Post
is one of the stranger names for a municipality in Quebec.
I know, but believe it or not it's named for an actual guy and that was his name.
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  #10108  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2017, 5:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Kanata is also excluded from Ottawa's, which makes no sense. I get the impression a StatsCan guy went out and measured the exact width of the greenbelt with a measuring tape to the exact mm in order to exclude it. Why, I don't know!
The notion of a city being one blob of built-up land is outdated, and has been outdated for a long time. It used to be more relevant back in the days when most people had to walk where they were going. Back then, Kanata would have been a day trip or more from Ottawa, not a reasonable commuting distance. But by 1830 there were steamship ferries and by the later 1800's lots of people were commuting 5-10 km or more daily on trains that travelled between towns separated by wilderness or farmland.

In the future if transportation continues to improve (I'm not sure it has been lately in Canada), the notion of urban area will be even less meaningful. There will be much larger economic regions encompassing areas with a radius of hundreds of kilometres. The notion of regional constructs like the GTA is more important than the idea of population centres. Almost every economically vibrant area in Canada is part of a decent-sized urban region. The small towns that are doing OK today are mostly part of a large urban region and the dying ones are not.
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  #10109  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2017, 6:13 PM
YannickTO YannickTO is offline
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I was wondering with all the development we saw in Mississauga for the past decade, I was wondering why the population grew only by 1.1% ? Deaths/births balance? But I always thought there was a big influx of new residents in that city. Does someone know why such a small growth increase?
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  #10110  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2017, 8:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YannickTO View Post
I was wondering with all the development we saw in Mississauga for the past decade, I was wondering why the population grew only by 1.1% ? Deaths/births balance? But I always thought there was a big influx of new residents in that city. Does someone know why such a small growth increase?
My guess is the expensive real estate. Milton and Newmarket are the new Mississauga.
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  #10111  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2017, 10:03 PM
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I did some calculations from StatsCan on inter provincial migration over the last 3 decades. Starting from July 1 1986 to July 1 2017 (one year after the 2016 census), I calculated the total net inter provincial migration for each province. Only BC and Alberta had positive inter provincial migration during this period. BC gained 397,023 and Alberta gained 394,223. Percentage-wise, Alberta did the best, and BC for total number. Every other province lost population in exchanges with the other provinces. See numbers below:
NL -86,116
PE -3,680
NS -36,784
NB -40,520
QC -290,396
ON -3,133
MB -159,143
SK -154,913
AB +394,223
BC +397,023
YK -186
NT -3,680
NU -2,541

There were variances within certain periods for sure, but this is the total number after 31 years. The only thing that pushed BC past Alberta is the most recent Jul 2016-2017 period. BC gained 16,000 during this period, and Alberta lost 15,000. But they are essentially neck and neck in total numbers over the past 30 years. Ontario will be back in positive territory by the next population estimate, but won't be anywhere near BC for the forseeable future barring any catastrophe. Alberta will likely have a couple more quarters of losses, but it is slowing.

All data can be pulled from tables here:
http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a26...ataTable&csid=
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  #10112  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2017, 10:38 PM
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I was surprised by how high the MB/SK losses are and how small the losses are in the Maritimes.

A lot of people think that outmigration is a huge issue in the Maritimes, and that most people move away. But these numbers amount to about 4% of the population leaving during a 30 year period, which is pretty minor.

Manitoba and Saskatchewan have had faster population growth but I think this is mostly due to immigration. Economically and demographically the larger provincial nominee program seems to account for most of the difference between, say, MB and NB.

PEI has also had a lot of success with immigration so has had a growing population. Yet it is the smallest and most rural province. According to conventional wisdom about economic activity inexorably gravitating toward a few big cities it should be utterly doomed!
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  #10113  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2017, 11:23 PM
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Originally Posted by someone123 View Post
I was surprised by how high the MB/SK losses are and how small the losses are in the Maritimes.

A lot of people think that outmigration is a huge issue in the Maritimes, and that most people move away. But these numbers amount to about 4% of the population leaving during a 30 year period, which is pretty minor.

Manitoba and Saskatchewan have had faster population growth but I think this is mostly due to immigration. Economically and demographically the larger provincial nominee program seems to account for most of the difference between, say, MB and NB.

PEI has also had a lot of success with immigration so has had a growing population. Yet it is the smallest and most rural province. According to conventional wisdom about economic activity inexorably gravitating toward a few big cities it should be utterly doomed!
Yes you're right on all points. The smaller provinces are definitely getting a big boost from international migration, and as a % it accounts for way more growth in those provinces than it does in BC, Alberta, or Ontario.

I have an excel sheet with each year and census period, so you can see the breakdown. Some swings are fairly dramatic, with some years being hugely positive and then swinging to negative. The largest growth in a single census period was BC in 1991-1996, gaining 167,290. The largest loss was Quebec in 1996-2001, losing 69,047.
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  #10114  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 12:39 AM
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I'm surprised how Ontario didn't loose more people
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  #10115  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 12:58 AM
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I'm surprised how Ontario didn't loose more people

Ontario is a big draw for many people in Atlantic Canada and Quebec.
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  #10116  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 3:58 AM
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It's not surprising to see the large declines in MB/SK and the large increases in AB/BC.

The West's total percentage of the national population is only 5% in the last century, much lower than the US. The change in the West is not so much the number of people but rather where in the West they are living. The West has been a story of the thousands who leave SK/MB for AB/BC. Relatively few Atlantic Can & Quebecers move to the West but rather to Ontario and there are relatively few Ontarians who move to the West and many of those are for purely job opportunities and tend to move back when good times return to Ontario. People never moved to BC for the jobs or money as Alberta ussually offers the better of both but BC has always been a draw for seniors wanting to retire in a more moderate climate.
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  #10117  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 4:17 AM
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Originally Posted by ssiguy View Post
It's not surprising to see the large declines in MB/SK and the large increases in AB/BC.

The West's total percentage of the national population is only 5% in the last century, much lower than the US. The change in the West is not so much the number of people but rather where in the West they are living. The West has been a story of the thousands who leave SK/MB for AB/BC. Relatively few Atlantic Can & Quebecers move to the West but rather to Ontario and there are relatively few Ontarians who move to the West and many of those are for purely job opportunities and tend to move back when good times return to Ontario. People never moved to BC for the jobs or money as Alberta ussually offers the better of both but BC has always been a draw for seniors wanting to retire in a more moderate climate.
Can you show data to prove your argument?
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  #10118  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 1:42 PM
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  #10119  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 5:53 PM
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Originally Posted by YannickTO View Post
I was wondering with all the development we saw in Mississauga for the past decade, I was wondering why the population grew only by 1.1% ? Deaths/births balance? But I always thought there was a big influx of new residents in that city. Does someone know why such a small growth increase?
It's due to the changing demographics of the area.

Mississauga was very much a huge growth area of the 60s to 90s with mostly SFH. Those SFH are all still there but where they use to have Mom & Dad with 3 to 5 kids, now those homes may only have 1 or 2 as the kids have moved out leaving only the parents. For those parents those SFH leave for other locations they are probably again replaced parents with kids but now those families probably have the most 3 kids are probably more 1 or 2.
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  #10120  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 6:54 PM
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Quebec c'est une passoire, les gens rentrent ici, yen a qui restent, les autres s'en vont à Toronto ou Vancouver faire monter le marché immobilier. C'est ça qui disent.
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