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  #4201  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2017, 2:06 AM
lio45 lio45 is offline
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Originally Posted by CanSpice View Post
Because UBC's statistics would seem to dispute this.
Based on what you posted there's nothing in UBC's statistics that would dispute the assertion that 52% of their students are ethnically Chinese, regardless of their citizenship status. (From my visit to UBC a few years ago I'd actually guess 52% might even be on the low side, or else the half who aren't East Asian in origin were well hidden; but it may just be my sample.)

(Note that I'm limiting myself to what you posted, I don't care enough to look for better data.)
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  #4202  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2017, 2:16 AM
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Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
Racism is always bad, but you can be as racist as you fucking want without really, structurally, long-term harming anyone when you're a minority. Power is the key. In other countries, white people may not have the power, and then might actually feel the socioeconomic impacts of racism.
I don't think it's true that white individuals are always more powerful than non-white individuals though, or that white people or people of any ethnicity or background necessarily behave as a cohesive group and look after each other.

The last president of the US was a lot more powerful than most of the white people in the US or, arguably, any white person in Canada. There are a lot of poor unemployed white people in the US who have almost no power whatsoever. And actually there is a lot of scorn for "white trash" in more affluent parts of the US.

Ultimately I don't think race is a very useful way to look at most things. It's only a weak predictor of what somebody's day-to-day life will be like in a country like Canada. Wealth is much, much more important, for example.
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  #4203  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2017, 2:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
Based on what you posted there's nothing in UBC's statistics that would dispute the assertion that 52% of their students are ethnically Chinese, regardless of their citizenship status. (From my visit to UBC a few years ago I'd actually guess 52% might even be on the low side, or else the half who aren't East Asian in origin were well hidden; but it may just be my sample.)

(Note that I'm limiting myself to what you posted, I don't care enough to look for better data.)
Quite Donaldian. "Believe me!"
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  #4204  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2017, 9:53 PM
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For those who think I never apologize for false facts, I am here to admit my stats for UBC enrollment were incorrect.

I stated that 52% of UBC students were Chinese descent and that is not the case. Chinese make up 41% but Koreans make up 9% and Japanese 2% for a total of 53% who would be once classified as "Oriental" to make the distinction it does not include South Asians or Southern Asia ie Phillipines.

Please note however that those stats are from 2012 and no doubt the Chinese population has increased much faster than the general population due to BC's unending desire for more money ie foreign students who are overwhelmingly Chinese during skyrocketing International enrollment admissions.

Last edited by ssiguy; Oct 13, 2017 at 3:59 AM.
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  #4205  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2017, 11:36 PM
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Originally Posted by ssiguy View Post
For those who think I never apologize for false facts, I am here to admit my stats for UBC enrollment were incorrect.

I stated that 52% of UBC students were Chinese descent and that is not the case. Chinese make up 41% but koreans make up 9% and Japanese 2% for a total of 53% who would be once classified as "Oriental" to make the distinction it does not include South Asians or Southern Asia ie Phillipines.

Please not however that those stats are from 2012 and nott doubt the Chinese population has increased much faster than the general population due to BC's unending desire for more money ie foreign students who are overwhelmingly Chinese during skyrocketing International enrollment admissions.
Where are these stats from? I posted my source, you have to post yours.
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  #4206  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 4:04 AM
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Data source...........UBC Vancouver voluntary survey 2012. Can be also found at Vancouver Sun 2015 article under headline "One in six UBC students are white male"
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  #4207  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 1:48 PM
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Quote:
Please note however that those stats are from 2012 and no doubt the Chinese population has increased much faster than the general population due to BC's unending desire for more money ie foreign students who are overwhelmingly Chinese during skyrocketing International enrollment admissions.
In that regards, BC universities are no different from those research-intensive universities in most of the English-speaking world (and for that matter, for Grande-Ecoles in France, which also heavily court foreign students, of which most are from China).
What will you have universities do otherwise, since government spending on tertiary education is less than half of what it was in the 70s (adjusted for enrollments), and despite tuition hikes of 3 times the rate of inflation over the past few decades (aside from Quebec), universities are starved for funds. Ontario actually claws back monies raised by the much higher (~3x) tuition fees imposed on foreign students.
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  #4208  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 9:44 PM
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Today, the Federal and Provincial governments announced the next phase of the Atlantic Apprenticeship Harmonization Project, which includes Manitoba (because Manitoba is already in an agreement with New Brunswick to share these things).

So, 6 new trades have been added, bringing to 16 the total number of trades that are interchangeable between participating provinces. That means the name, the eligibility requirements, the curriculum, the log books, every single ****ing thing for these trades, are identical in all five provinces, and apprentices can move freely between them.

This sounds like a good way to get all of our apprentices west but this sort of work is often temporary and cyclical, and apprentices will end up coming to Newfoundland just as much as they leave. The key is they will get to become journeypersons much faster.

And, as part of this second phase, the associated office running the program will be located in Newfoundland, the first inter-governmental office of its kind here. (Don't forget, it was only 20 years ago the federal government almost put the organization running our oil industry in Montreal because, if it was in Newfoundland, where would the children of employees go to school? That's a legit thing that was said to Premier Peckford. So we've come a long way, baby! Or, more accurately, ye have lol)


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Last edited by SignalHillHiker; Oct 14, 2017 at 12:45 AM.
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  #4209  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 11:40 PM
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Originally Posted by MolsonExport View Post
What will you have universities do otherwise, since government spending on tertiary education is less than half of what it was in the 70s (adjusted for enrollments), and despite tuition hikes of 3 times the rate of inflation over the past few decades (aside from Quebec), universities are starved for funds. Ontario actually claws back monies raised by the much higher (~3x) tuition fees imposed on foreign students.
There's still a lot of room for improvement. I used to work for a university and I was always shocked by how many people worked in administration (often doing very little), and how many of the services that private companies usually subcontract out were handled in-house at great cost. Like in the public sector, these jobs were very cushy, complete with pensions and lavish health benefits. The nature of universities also creates a lot of redundant positions; why should there be several people in charge of reviewing grants and financial statements in each department of, roughly, 40 faculty members? Get a centralized department to handle these things university-wide. In many cases, I found a lot of these people to be worse than useless, since faculty members had to do a lot of this work (grant preparation, financial reporting, writing formal job descriptions, etc.) themselves.

This wouldn't be so appalling if we didn't ask young people to go into serious debt to pay for this, all while they increasingly don't receive their education from tenure track faculty members (who have 80 hour work weeks managing all the bureaucracy, on top of their regular research and teaching responsibilities, that those admin staff are supposed to be doing), but from underpaid adjunct professors who have to teach classes in a gig economy.
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  #4210  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2017, 1:07 AM
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At Queen's, all forms of general construction/maintenance is performed by an in-house group called Physical Plant Services who receive salaries WAY beyond the standard market rates for such people in Kingston. It distorts the local market for tradespeople very badly because all the good people go work for Queen's, leaving behind only the shitty ones for the general public to hire. If the department was scrapped and the services contracted out it would fix this problem and save a whackton of money to boot.

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Originally Posted by hipster duck View Post
underpaid adjunct professors who have to teach classes in a gig economy.
I have no source for this, but one thing I commonly heard from student groups while at Queen's was that "80% of university classes are taught by profs who make less than high school teachers". Granted, high school teachers in Ontario are also somewhat overpaid too; with regular cost-of-living increases, Ontario's 10 year+ high school teachers are only a few years away from making six figures.
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  #4211  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2017, 3:02 AM
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As a faculty member, researcher and administrator, most weeks I work 70 hours. My personal staff has gone from 3 to 1, and the latter is only part time.
That old chestnut of lazy university employees is not really true anymore. We had a cascade of layoffs during the great recession, and most of those positions were never replaced. And I work for one of the wealthier universities in the country. Yeah, we also rely heavily on adjunct faculty for teaching, but us tenured professors are working harder than ever in the publish or perish world of academia. All of my colleagues who got tenure put in 50+ hours per week; those going up for tenure do at least that, and those that did not...well they didn't get tenure! We put in a lot of hours for our sunshine list salaries, but when you break it down by the hours worked...it is not nearly as impressive. And all those hours at work means less time for work around the house and parenting, so many of us are single income families. Is there an occupation that requires so much schooling that pays as little as what most professors receive? 2 years college, 4 years undergraduate, 2 years masters, 5+ years PhD...those were fucking lean years of very little material wealth (and a great deal of student debt).

who earns more? Plumbers or Professors? you would be surprised.
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We must always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented. Sometimes we must interfere.Elie Wiesel
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  #4212  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2017, 3:30 AM
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Look at guys who do siding and other shit jobs like that for insurance, money train there. By the hour, plumbers are an OK trade but nothing great. I was lucky and fell into(after a short layoff period) what turns out to be the 3rd highest paid trade in the country after elevators and sprinkler fitters. Best part is I never have to touch a poop pipe!
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  #4213  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2017, 11:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MolsonExport View Post
As a faculty member, researcher and administrator, most weeks I work 70 hours. My personal staff has gone from 3 to 1, and the latter is only part time.
That old chestnut of lazy university employees is not really true anymore. We had a cascade of layoffs during the great recession, and most of those positions were never replaced. And I work for one of the wealthier universities in the country. Yeah, we also rely heavily on adjunct faculty for teaching, but us tenured professors are working harder than ever in the publish or perish world of academia. All of my colleagues who got tenure put in 50+ hours per week; those going up for tenure do at least that, and those that did not...well they didn't get tenure! We put in a lot of hours for our sunshine list salaries, but when you break it down by the hours worked...it is not nearly as impressive. And all those hours at work means less time for work around the house and parenting, so many of us are single income families. Is there an occupation that requires so much schooling that pays as little as what most professors receive? 2 years college, 4 years undergraduate, 2 years masters, 5+ years PhD...those were fucking lean years of very little material wealth (and a great deal of student debt).

who earns more? Plumbers or Professors? you would be surprised.
Those are the arguments I use when people start complaining about greedy doctors too.

Throw in the facts that we are also effectively managing small businesses, usually have uncompensated teaching and administrative responsibilities, risk malpractice suits and have no pensions or benefits and things get even worse.

This is why we are so offended by JT's tax proposals.

We are not greedy and we are not tax cheats!

We also have no recourse to compensate for the tax changes. Most other professionals can simply increase their rates. We can't. Trades people will likely resort to more work under the table. We can't.

It almost seems as if Trudeau is targeting physicians in particular........
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  #4214  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2017, 3:08 PM
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Marijuana company to breathe new life into Cobourg’s former Kraft plant

A Whitby-based company is about to transform Cobourg’s former Kraft plant into a multi-million-square-foot medical marijuana facility that could create as many as 1,200 jobs in five years.

https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/201...aft-plant.html
Quote:
Cobourg’s former Kraft plant is about to be transformed into a multi-million-square-foot medical marijuana facility that could generate as many as 1,200 jobs in five years.

FV Pharma Inc. secured a licence from Health Canada to legally grow medical marijuana on Friday, said founder and CEO Thomas Fairfull. The Whitby-based company wants to harvest its first crop, 4,000 kilos of marijuana, as early as February 2018. It aims to employ 150 people by the end of next year and “keep going as we add space,” said Fairfull.

FV Pharma intends to purchase the entire 15-acre property, now called the Cobourg Innovation Centre, and has a closing date set for December.

“I don’t like leasing, it sounds temporary,” Fairfull said, adding he’s here to stay.

“I got some investors involved, brought more money in and thought, ‘we will make this operation the biggest and best marijuana facility in the world.’”

The plan is a long time coming. FV Pharma has been leasing space in the former Kraft plant, 520 William St., for five years. It has 25,000 square feet ready for production and in the next year will expand by an additional 300,000.

In next five years, Fairfull envisions equipping the facility with four million square feet of growth space across five levels.

“The plan is to convert the whole facility into medical marijuana production,” he said.

Kraft Canada closed its Cobourg plant in 2008, cutting about 250 jobs. In 2009, the new owner converted the facility into a business park, with space for up to 15 businesses.

Currently, tenants occupy “a very small portion of the property,” but they will move out once their leases expire, Fairfull said.

Cobourg Mayor Gil Brocanier declined to comment on FV Pharma’s plans until the official announcement is made on Monday.

Fairfull was drawn to the property because of its location — right off Hwy. 401 and only 120 kilometres from downtown Toronto — and became interested in producing medical marijuana because of his personal experience managing the symptoms of his Type 2 diabetes.

He’d suffered negative side effects, including suicidal thoughts, when taking a prescription drug to help with neuropathy occurring in his feet, but experienced pain relief and no “ridiculous” side effects when ingesting medical marijuana.

“Medical marijuana can be lucrative, but it can also help a lot of people,” Fairfull said.

He wants to create a lecture hall in the facility to host presentations and conferences for the medical community to educate them on the health benefits of marijuana.

When the federal government legalizes marijuana for recreational use as early as July 2018, FV Pharma plans to produce “some” marijuana for that market, but concentrate most of its efforts on the medical side, said Fairfull.

FV Pharma is among 37 licensed Ontario medical marijuana producers. Ontario has the most out of all the provinces and territories, followed by B.C., which has 15.

Another Canadian cannabis producer, Aphria, is in the process of expanding its facility in Leamington to one million square feet worth of greenhouse space, tripling its production capacity.
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  #4215  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2017, 4:25 PM
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Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
Today, the Federal and Provincial governments announced the next phase of the Atlantic Apprenticeship Harmonization Project, which includes Manitoba (because Manitoba is already in an agreement with New Brunswick to share these things).

So, 6 new trades have been added, bringing to 16 the total number of trades that are interchangeable between participating provinces. That means the name, the eligibility requirements, the curriculum, the log books, every single ****ing thing for these trades, are identical in all five provinces, and apprentices can move freely between them.

This sounds like a good way to get all of our apprentices west but this sort of work is often temporary and cyclical, and apprentices will end up coming to Newfoundland just as much as they leave. The key is they will get to become journeypersons much faster.

And, as part of this second phase, the associated office running the program will be located in Newfoundland, the first inter-governmental office of its kind here. (Don't forget, it was only 20 years ago the federal government almost put the organization running our oil industry in Montreal because, if it was in Newfoundland, where would the children of employees go to school? That's a legit thing that was said to Premier Peckford. So we've come a long way, baby! Or, more accurately, ye have lol)
This sounds like a great idea, the type of thing that should already be country wide.
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  #4216  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2017, 5:39 PM
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I was speaking with a contractor working on the new ALCB warehouse and they indicated that as soon as the massive new warehouse is operational the old warehouse in St Albert is being reconfigured as a pot distribution facility
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Really ? You make it sound like it's a bad thing.
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  #4217  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2017, 6:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TownGuy View Post
Marijuana company to breathe new life into Cobourg’s former Kraft plant

A Whitby-based company is about to transform Cobourg’s former Kraft plant into a multi-million-square-foot medical marijuana facility that could create as many as 1,200 jobs in five years.

https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/201...aft-plant.html
Love hearing stuff like this. Glad to see that plant will again become thriving.
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  #4218  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2017, 8:08 PM
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Originally Posted by 240glt View Post
I was speaking with a contractor working on the new ALCB warehouse and they indicated that as soon as the massive new warehouse is operational the old warehouse in St Albert is being reconfigured as a pot distribution facility
That’ll be home to a lot of Bud.
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  #4219  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2017, 11:53 PM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
Those are the arguments I use when people start complaining about greedy doctors too.

Throw in the facts that we are also effectively managing small businesses, usually have uncompensated teaching and administrative responsibilities, risk malpractice suits and have no pensions or benefits and things get even worse.

This is why we are so offended by JT's tax proposals.

We are not greedy and we are not tax cheats!

We also have no recourse to compensate for the tax changes. Most other professionals can simply increase their rates. We can't. Trades people will likely resort to more work under the table. We can't.

It almost seems as if Trudeau is targeting physicians in particular........
The way I see it.. these are fair complaints, but doctors shouldn't have to rely on sweetheart tax treatment from the federal government to make their profession pay appropriately. Instead provinces should just pay them more.

My idea is that the government use all of the money generated from all the changes to personal corporation tax policy to increase the Canada Health Transfer to the provinces, with a rule that all of that additional money be used to increase physician compensation. Win-win.

(And yes, this would result in the extra money being collected from all incorporated professionals--including lawyers, tradespeople, etc--being given to doctors. I actually think that's fair, given that doctors are really the most critical problem with the proposals).
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  #4220  
Old Posted Oct 15, 2017, 1:20 AM
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Originally Posted by 1overcosc View Post
The way I see it.. these are fair complaints, but doctors shouldn't have to rely on sweetheart tax treatment from the federal government to make their profession pay appropriately. Instead provinces should just pay them more.

My idea is that the government use all of the money generated from all the changes to personal corporation tax policy to increase the Canada Health Transfer to the provinces, with a rule that all of that additional money be used to increase physician compensation. Win-win.

(And yes, this would result in the extra money being collected from all incorporated professionals--including lawyers, tradespeople, etc--being given to doctors. I actually think that's fair, given that doctors are really the most critical problem with the proposals).
I appreciate your intentions but I'm not really interested in making more money, I just want a mechanism so that I am able to invest my current income in a tax efficient vehicle for retirement. This is the value of passive investment in your professional corporation.

The problem with boosting incomes to compensate for changes to tax policy is that as physicians paid from the public purse, our billings are a matter of public record and are published in the media on an annual basis.

If, for example, an orthopaedic surgeon bills medicare $500,000 per year for services, this is the number that is published in the local newspaper. The orthopods neighbours see this and assume that this is the surgeons salary, not his gross billings before expenses. This can lead to a lot of whispering and grumbling and unfair assumptions about what the surgeons lifestyle must really be like. Under your proposal, if the surgeons billings are boosted to $700,000 instead (to compensate for the increased tax burden), this would lead to even more howls of outrage from the surgeons neighbours, especially since they would be mostly unaware as to the circumstances to the boost in his compensation.

I don't know about the mythical surgeon above, but the only reason why I passively save in my corporation is to ensure that I have enough savings for retirement, not to lavishly increase my current lifestyle.

The current system works well. It shouldn't be changed.........
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