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  #841  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 10:31 AM
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Originally Posted by TimB09 View Post
If the Aquilini's are indeed one of the potential buyers the opportunities for cross-marketing are there for sure.
I thought I read somewhere that Braley was waiting until the end of this season to finally sell the Lions.
Maybe the Lions woes aren't limited to them only. Here's a recent shot of a Canuck's game, maybe the sports market itself might be lagging.


Edit: That was just into the start of the game so it might have filled in.
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  #842  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 1:47 PM
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^ The difference of course is that most of those empty seats at the Canucks game were probably sold to someone.

What baffles me about places like Vancouver is why the ticket prices remain so high despite soft attendance? I mean, it's one thing when you have limitless demand like the Leafs to keep jacking up tickets to the point of absurdity. But if you're the Lions, isn't it better to get the family of four in for $80 instead of holding out (and failing) to sell the tickets for $75 each?

Also, I'm pretty sure Ambrosie resembles Kane more than Vince McMahon
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  #843  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 3:19 PM
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From what people have told me in Vancouver, people simply don't go to events unless they're cool to go to - hence why the Canucks have empty seats when the team isn't great. They're cool to go see when they're winning but if they're not winning who cares? Seems to be the attitude anyway. I'm sure the Lions and Whitecaps face similar issues.

The difference would be that the Canucks seats are likely sold and people simply aren't showing up.
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  #844  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 4:43 PM
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Originally Posted by JHikka View Post
From what people have told me in Vancouver, people simply don't go to events unless they're cool to go to - hence why the Canucks have empty seats when the team isn't great. They're cool to go see when they're winning but if they're not winning who cares? Seems to be the attitude anyway. I'm sure the Lions and Whitecaps face similar issues.

The difference would be that the Canucks seats are likely sold and people simply aren't showing up.
I think it is a combination of everything TBH

Cost
Cool factor
Accessability
Corporate

I used to have 6-7 clients I dealt with that had Canucks seasons tickets and I used to 6 or 7 games a year, but they have dwindled over the years as corporations are reducing this type of spending.
It is expensive to live in the Lower Mainland so many people live further out, so with not as many "suits" at the games, attendance suffers mid-week (same with Lions and Whitecaps mid-week)
With many people in Surrey, Langley and further out, getting DT is tough, especially on a week day and then factor in parking food, etc. Sometimes it is easier to go home and watch it in HD with a cheap beer and home cooking.
The Canucks did sell out for almost 10 years so when it is cool and the team is exciting people go.
Lions too were cool again in 2011, GC champs, new BC Place, etc. It is cyclical and hopefully with new ownership some fresh marketing and ticket pricing
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  #845  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 5:11 PM
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^ Let's face it, regardless of sport, there has never been a worse time to be a fan in the stands (high ticket prices, hassle of getting to and then into venues) and it's never been better to be a fan watching at home (big-screen HDTV feed with replays better than any seats in the building, comfort of living room, your own food with washroom steps away, no need to drive/take transit).

Sometimes I feel like a bit of a dupe for still going to Bomber games instead of just staying home and watching on TV.
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  #846  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 5:18 PM
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^Sometimes I feel like a bit of a dupe for still going to Bomber games instead of just staying home and watching on TV.
A lot of this feeds into the cool factor that I mentioned re: Vancouver. Sporting events are increasingly having to be events beyond simply the sport being played. It has to be something exciting to go to, worthwhile to experience. If you don't have an event that isn't worthy of being instagrammed or snapchatted you're losing out on a large number of casuals. It's got to be an it thing to do, otherwise nothing is motivating enough to leave your living room, or for younger people: even paying attention at all.

A lot of this can be affected by stadium, location, things to do before and after. There's a lot at play.
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  #847  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 5:21 PM
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Originally Posted by JHikka View Post
From what people have told me in Vancouver, people simply don't go to events unless they're cool to go to - hence why the Canucks have empty seats when the team isn't great. They're cool to go see when they're winning but if they're not winning who cares? Seems to be the attitude anyway. I'm sure the Lions and Whitecaps face similar issues.

The difference would be that the Canucks seats are likely sold and people simply aren't showing up.
Pretty much. That's why the Whitecaps have been regularly succesful - they're at least cool to a specific niche, even if they may not be overall. Neither the Lions or the Canucks have that niche.

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Originally Posted by esquire View Post
^ Let's face it, regardless of sport, there has never been a worse time to be a fan in the stands (high ticket prices, hassle of getting to and then into venues) and it's never been better to be a fan watching at home (big-screen HDTV feed with replays better than any seats in the building, comfort of living room, your own food with washroom steps away, no need to drive/take transit).

Sometimes I feel like a bit of a dupe for still going to Bomber games instead of just staying home and watching on TV.
I keep hearing this and I can never agree. There's no replacement for seeing something happen with your own eyes and from seeing the players in real life. Watching sports on TV is like watching a movie. The players are just characters and you're detached from the experience. Watching sports live is so much more authentic.
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  #848  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 5:27 PM
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I keep hearing this and I can never agree. There's no replacement for seeing something happen with your own eyes and from seeing the players in real life. Watching sports on TV is like watching a movie. The players are just characters and you're detached from the experience. Watching sports live is so much more authentic.
No question watching in person is better. But when the marginal cost of watching at home is $0 (assuming you have a HDTV, cable and a well-stocked fridge) while going to game costs you $100+ in addition to the time it takes to get there, then all of a sudden the living room isn't looking too bad.

The costs and inconveniences of attending a sports event are getting to the point where clearly a lot of people are simply opting to stay home and watch.
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  #849  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 5:30 PM
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No question watching in person is better. But when the marginal cost of watching at home is $0 (assuming you have a HDTV, cable and a well-stocked fridge) while going to game costs you $100+ in addition to the time it takes to get there, then all of a sudden the living room isn't looking too bad.

The costs and inconveniences of attending a sports event are getting to the point where clearly a lot of people are simply opting to stay home and watch.
Fair enough, I thought you were ignoring costs. Relative to how much they cost, yeah, watching at home on the TV has never looked better.
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  #850  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 6:30 PM
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Fair enough, I thought you were ignoring costs. Relative to how much they cost, yeah, watching at home on the TV has never looked better.
When I read your first comment about this it's immediately the logistics of attending a game that jumped out at me.

You talked about someone from the Fraser Valley coming into town for a weeknight game. Imagine if you live in the Fraser Valley and work in Burnaby or Richmond, and you have to go back home before the game. Sure the easy solution is to stay in town after work but not everybody has that luxury. Especially people who have young kids. And what if you want to take your kids to the game? What a concept.

That's where it really becomes clear how our transportation networks have not kept pace. I know our cities have grown but it was far easier for people to get around our cities and metros even 20 years ago, and that's because transportation infrastructure has not kept pace at all with population growth. Not even close.

I don't think there is any city in Canada where it's gotten easier to come downtown (in off-peak periods) for any type of event (sports, culture, entertainment, etc.) Everywhere in the country it's become a big pain in the ass.

Downtown in most large Canadian cities is still vibrant and a "place to play". In some cases more than ever. But that's because of the strong growth of downtown residential markets.

But my sense is that the average suburbanite or exurbanite comes downtown less than before, likely due to logistical challenges, and of course increased offerings outside of city cores.

If we want our cities to reach the next level of vibrancy, we are going to need to make it easier for people from the burbs and exurbs to come there to have fun.
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  #851  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 7:03 PM
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When I read your first comment about this it's immediately the logistics of attending a game that jumped out at me.

You talked about someone from the Fraser Valley coming into town for a weeknight game. Imagine if you live in the Fraser Valley and work in Burnaby or Richmond, and you have to go back home before the game. Sure the easy solution is to stay in town after work but not everybody has that luxury. Especially people who have young kids. And what if you want to take your kids to the game? What a concept.

That's where it really becomes clear how our transportation networks have not kept pace. I know our cities have grown but it was far easier for people to get around our cities and metros even 20 years ago, and that's because transportation infrastructure has not kept pace at all with population growth. Not even close.

I don't think there is any city in Canada where it's gotten easier to come downtown (in off-peak periods) for any type of event (sports, culture, entertainment, etc.) Everywhere in the country it's become a big pain in the ass.

Downtown in most large Canadian cities is still vibrant and a "place to play". In some cases more than ever. But that's because of the strong growth of downtown residential markets.

But my sense is that the average suburbanite or exurbanite comes downtown less than before, likely due to logistical challenges, and of course increased offerings outside of city cores.

If we want our cities to reach the next level of vibrancy, we are going to need to make it easier for people from the burbs and exurbs to come there to have fun.
No for sure, it's definitely a pain to get to games. I just thought esquire meant all else being equal, watching on TV can be just as good or better than watching live. Of course once you factor in costs live games are a tougher sell, but I still think it's a better experience.

But yes, it's pretty clear in all our cities that infrastructure hasn't kept up with suburban growth. We sometimes talk derisively about suburbanites that never go downtown, but can you really blame them?
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  #852  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 7:32 PM
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No for sure, it's definitely a pain to get to games. I just thought esquire meant all else being equal, watching on TV can be just as good or better than watching live. Of course once you factor in costs live games are a tougher sell, but I still think it's a better experience.

But yes, it's pretty clear in all our cities that infrastructure hasn't kept up with suburban growth. We sometimes talk derisively about suburbanites that never go downtown, but can you really blame them?
I recently resumed going to occasional pro sporting events after a hiatus of many years, and holy cow did I ever find it to be an "excursion" compared to what it used to be. Not just the transportation to and from the game, although that's a big factor for sure. Leaving early from work to get there with a bit of time to spare to get a bite and getting home close to midnight after a 7:30 game. And I don't live that far out. Missing the (re)start of the game after intermissions due to huge lineups at bathrooms and concessions... in reasonably modern facilities! And of course I won't even mention the price of a hotdog and a beer.

And I usually go solo with the boys - I am not even lugging kids with me, so I am even more nimble!

Anyway, maybe I am just being bitchy...
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  #853  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 8:22 PM
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Argos receiver Jimmy Ralph just continuing in the family business
Morgan Campbell, Toronto Star 3Down Staff October 13, 2017

Rookie receiver Jimmy Ralph boarded an elevator with Ricky Ray during Argos training camp and reminded the veteran quarterback about their first meeting.

Ray didn’t remember it, but he signed an autograph for Ralph in 2003 when Ray was a CFL sophomore and Ralph was a fourth-grader. The pair shared a laugh over the elevator confession, their shared connection highlighting Ray’s longevity and the Ralph family’s football legacy.

Big brother Brock was Ray’s teammate on that Eskimos squad, while another brother, Brett, spent five seasons as a CFL receiver. And heading into this weekend’s visit to Edmonton, youngest brother Jimmy has won a spot in the Argos’ receiving rotation.

A return to his home province means a long list of relatives hoping to connect, but Ralph says his folks are veterans at balancing football and family.

“My family’s been through it, and they know this is a business trip,” said Ralph, who has 19 receptions for 175 yards this season. “When I give them the OK they’ll come pick me up, but other than that it’s a focussed week for me.”

It’s all business for Argos head coach Marc Trestman.

Last Saturday’s 27-24 loss to the Saskatchewan didn’t cost the team first place in the CFL’s East Division but, in dropping a home game, the Argos, now 7-8, squandered a chance to get over the .500 mark and impress local fans with a big win.

Trestman says he’s eager to see how quickly the club can rebound from a disappointing loss.

“One thing about the guys is they’ve handled a loss just like they’ve handled a win,” Trestman said. “They’ve gone to work, tried to get better . . . They understand the importance of each and every game.”

The Argos hosted Edmonton three weeks ago and won 34-26.

Ralph caught two passes for 20 yards that day, then two weeks later recorded career highs in catches (six) and yards (62) against Hamilton.

The numbers reflect Ralph’s growing role in the Argos’ offence, and further remind him he made the right decision in following his older brothers into the family business.

He played the middle infield in baseball well enough to make Canada’s national junior team, and competed at the 2010 world junior championship in Thunder Bay. That squad included future Blue Jay Dalton Pompey, and they competed against current Jays prospect Lourdes Gurriel Jr.

But no matter how well he performed on the diamond, Ralph always believed he belonged on the gridiron.

“My brothers always joked about it and said baseball might be the better decision,” he said. “But football was always where my heart was.”

Older brother Brock was twice drafted by the Baltimore Orioles, but he stuck with football and racked up 238 receptions for 3,045 yards and 12 touchdowns in nine CFL seasons.

Middle brother Brett also had 12 receiving touchdowns in his five-year career with Calgary.

But Ray says even though the Ralph brothers share a name and a position, each has a unique on-field identity. Where Brock was a six-foot-three downfield threat, the shorter, shiftier Jimmy lines up in the slot and finds soft spots in opposing defences.

Ray says Ralph benefits from the football wisdom his big brothers gathered over their 14 combined CFL seasons.

“Definitely having those guys, to draw from their experiences, has helped him out,” Ray said.

After starting his college career at Weber State, Ralph transferred to the University of Alberta, where he caught 84 passes for 1,454 yards over his final two seasons.

Ralph didn’t play the 2016 season but entered this spring’s CFL draft anyway, reasoning a team would pick him based on his two standout seasons at U of A. But the draft’s seven rounds passed and no team selected Ralph. Minutes after the final selection, the Argos called to offer a spot at training camp and a chance to compete for a job.

“Once you get into camp you’re out there trying to make the team, no matter where you got drafted,” Ralph said. “I used it as motivation.”
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  #854  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 8:28 PM
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Speaking of, what's this jibber jabber about Ricky Ray going back to Edmonton?
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  #855  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 8:40 PM
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Stamps vs Ti-Cats tonight, lets see just how much better Hamilton is compared to their last meeting.
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  #856  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 8:49 PM
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  #857  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 8:50 PM
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Stamps vs Ti-Cats tonight, lets see just how much better Hamilton is compared to their last meeting.
That's about all this game will be good for, it's basically a measuring stick for the Ticats. Narrowing the gap from a 60-1 loss last time out to a 48-18 loss will be significant progress for Hamilton
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  #858  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 10:05 PM
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The Calgary ownership group that owns the Flames also owns the Stampeders. But there are rumblings within the Stampeder camp that they would like to separate from the Flames. Seems like it has been no advantage for the Stamps to be married to the Flames.

We shall see.
I can see that. The recent merry-go-round between Ken King and the City has shown that the Stampeders are an afterthought at best to the Flames ownership.
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  #859  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 11:35 PM
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I recently resumed going to occasional pro sporting events after a hiatus of many years, and holy cow did I ever find it to be an "excursion" compared to what it used to be. Not just the transportation to and from the game, although that's a big factor for sure. Leaving early from work to get there with a bit of time to spare to get a bite and getting home close to midnight after a 7:30 game. And I don't live that far out. Missing the (re)start of the game after intermissions due to huge lineups at bathrooms and concessions... in reasonably modern facilities! And of course I won't even mention the price of a hotdog and a beer.

And I usually go solo with the boys - I am not even lugging kids with me, so I am even more nimble!

Anyway, maybe I am just being bitchy...
I lived and worked about 1-1.5 hours away from BC Place by transit and I didn't feel it to be as inconvenient as you seem to, though it may be a case of different expectations. I went to a few Lions games after work. Get off at 5, get downtown at 6, get some fast food and pound a couple quick beers outside and you're in for a 7pm start. Inside, beer and washroom lineups are never an issue. But yes, with night-time transit to the suburbs, I'd get home around 12 too but football games are on the weekend so it doesn't matter.

That does make me realize now though, you're right. I would never go to a Canucks game on a weekday. The hassle of getting home so late and waking up early for work the next day just isn't worth it. A weekend football game is an event and really no different than going to a bar in terms of travel/money spent. But weekday events, that's a whole other animal.
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  #860  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2017, 1:12 AM
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Regarding lineups at the game, if you're at a Lions game the attendance is generally well below the capacity of the facility. This reduces lineups for sure. I go to Senators, Habs or Redblacks games, all of which get capacity or near-capacity crowds.

I just find the spontaneity of going to a game on a spur of the moment is largely gone.
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