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  #1921  
Old Posted Oct 9, 2017, 6:26 PM
jslice jslice is offline
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Originally Posted by Slyfox View Post
I get it, and I understand how you feel. I drive through the downtown and think, "Wouldn't it be awesome if there was a high rise right here" and imagine what the neighborhoods would look like..... but I'm also pragmatic and realize there's nothing to draw them in.

I guess my point is the state and city need to do something drastic to bring in companies, you make a good point and it's one I agree with, every city in the country, small and large, is fighting tooth and nail to attract new business, they need to make major changes, like really lax laws and taxes. They don't have the warm weather and beaches like California, the mild winters of Texas, the romanticisation of New York. They need to truly be business friendly.
Don't sell Wilmington short. Two Fortune 500 companies (Chemours & Dupont), two companies on the S&P 500 (Navient & Incyte), major players investing heavily & adding jobs (JP Morgan Chase). DowDupont has reallocated LOB's back to Delaware. Incyte was just named the 6th most innovative company by Forbes (just behind Amazon, Tesla & Netflix). You can put Wilmington head-to-head with most cities in the area in terms of major forward looking employers(even Philly). I work in Wilmington at a major employer and I'd say the major problem is people live in PA,NJ but work here. Residential housing stock is exactly what the city needs. Need to keep people here and market Wilmington as more than just a business center. The beauty of the NW DE area in Chateau country is amazing. Market Street in Wilmington has fantastic potential. It just needs people to stay and live here. Tackle the perception of crime and public schools and Wilmington would be HOT.
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  #1922  
Old Posted Oct 9, 2017, 7:05 PM
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A campus transformed: Rowan's groundbreaking $100M gift, 25 years later

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When Rowan University students returned to school this fall, the campus was a familiar site. The mix of new, shiny buildings and mid-century edifices are still just a few blocks away from downtown Glassboro, home to a packed Barnes and Noble, and specialty restaurants that serve grilled cheese sandwiches and deliver cookies late at night — a typical college town.

If the same students walked onto campus 25 years ago, however, it would be unrecognizable.

This fall marks the 25th anniversary of the university's most galvanizing year, when a surprise $100 million gift from a successful South Jersey businessman transformed the small public university then known as Glassboro State College. Tucked amid peach farms and graduating mostly teachers, the college's operations cost well below $100 million. Now, Rowan is a rapidly expanding, nationally ranked research institution churning out engineers, medical doctors, MBAs and yes, still teachers, with an operating budget that exceeds $550 million.

“Transformative, it was revolutionary,” said Rowan President Ali Houshmand. “How else do you describe it?”

Henry "Hank" Rowan was a MIT-trained engineer who designed an industrial furnace for melting metals in his garage in 1953 and over five decades, grew his Westampton, N.J.-based business Inductotherm into a global company with 40 plants around the world.

He built up significant wealth in the process, so when a university administrator came asking for $1,500 donation in the early 1990s, Rowan opened up his checkbook. But when that administrator, Phil Tumminia, came back asking for a bigger gift to support the college's struggling business school, Rowan had a better idea.

“He pushed that for awhile and I said ‘Phil, I have zero interest in your school of business. What this world needs is more engineering, how to make things, we have to produce. Phil, what would you do with $100 million?’ and he nearly fell off the chair,” Rowan recalled from an interview with former University President Donald Farish.

Bestselling author Malcolm Gladwell included audio excerpts from that interview in an episode of his podcast, Revisionist History, that explores the effects Rowan’s pledge — the largest ever given to a public university at the time — had on the school in contrast to the massive gifts given to already immensely wealthy institutions.

“Rowan’s gift made headlines around the country, it set a new standard,” Gladwell says in the episode, “My Little Hundred Million.” The phrase comes from Rowan himself, who said that sum would've been a drop in a bucket at his alma mater, MIT, but at Glassboro State, it could make a real difference. He was right.

“At that time Rowan had, at most, 1,000 employees and staff,” Houshmand said. “Today, Rowan has 4,000 employees. Think about the impact that makes, 3,000 additional families are receiving a paycheck and sending kids to college. These are impacts that are going to keep on getting bigger and bigger.”

The gift transformed Rowan's hometown of Glassboro just as much, having spurred more than $400 million in public and private investment into its now-bustling, and still growing, downtown.

The vast changes at the university itself since 1992 are almost too long to list. At the time of the gift, the university's endowment stood at less than $787,000. It's about $208 million today.

Over the same time period, the total student population swelled from about 9,500 to more than 18,500 today, tracking well ahead of the university's ambitious goal to enroll 25,000 by 2023.

The university is also the driving force behind the South Jersey Technology Park, built down the road from campus to house 1.5 million square feet of both public and private research on 188 acres.

In 2013, the shift in Rowan's academic focus became official when it was designated a comprehensive public research institution and opened the Cooper Medical School of Rowan University. Outside funding for research has reached $34 million. It 1992, it had brought in just $400,000. It's developed the campus itself rapidly, with more than $700 million worth of new construction going up in the past five years, more than any other public institution in the state.

It even acquired a local fossil park, of global importance to paleontologists, and received a $25 million gift from alumni Ric and Jean Edelman last year to turn the park into an world-class destination.

The university's metamorphoses has its roots in Rowan's "little hundred million," his daughter Virginia Rowan Smith said, but it couldn't have gotten to where it is today without the leadership of the three presidents who have run the school since the gift. In 2014, his family foundation donated another $15 million to its engineering school. Now named the Henry M. Rowan College of Engineering, it’s ranked the 19th best undergraduate engineering program in the country by U.S. News and World Report.

“I have to salute the people at the college who took the bull by the horns and said, ‘Okay, well let’s do it right. Let’s transform the university,’” Smith said. “That’s what they’ve been able to do.”

Its current leader, Houshmand, has even bigger plans for the next 25.

"I honestly believe in 25 years, Rowan will be the next Carnegie Mellon University," he said. "It will be comprehensive, very well-recognized, efficient, largest, and we'll really be a model for higher education in this country in terms of business model, efficiency, creativity and inclusivity by bringing others into the fold."

Rowan died on Dec. 9, 2015, at age 92. The next day, hundreds of students gathered around the 7-foot bronze statue of him that was unveiled on the 20th anniversary of the $100 million gift.

“He was proud til the day he died of [Rowan] and he’d be even more proud now,” Smith said.

Despite his burning desire to make a difference, Rowan’s gift didn’t come with the expectation Glassboro State would take on his name. That decision was all up to the school that was first founded as a two-year teacher training school in 1923, the same year Rowan was born.
https://www.bizjournals.com/philadel...niversary.html
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  #1923  
Old Posted Oct 9, 2017, 7:08 PM
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Buyer steps up for former Fisker plant in Wilmington

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Harvey Hanna & Associates Inc. has put under agreement the former General Motors assembly plant in Wilmington, Del., and is coming up with plans to redevelop the 142-acre site.

The property at 801 Boxwood Road has been idle for the last eight years and had a series of owners, but it is hoped that under Harvey Hanna’s ownership, it will have a bright future.

The property has more than 3.2 million square feet of space that, beginning in 1946, was used for assembling automobiles by General Motors. It was shuttered in 2009 when General Motors filed for bankruptcy.

It was bought in 2010 by Fisker Automotive for $20 million and the car company had plans to assemble hybrid vehicles in the plant, but that never happened.

In 2013, Fisker filed for bankruptcy and the site along with Fisker's intellectual property was bought by Wanxiang America Inc., a Chinese automotive parts maker. Wanxiang America is the seller in the transaction with Harvey Hanna.

How much the property is trading for this time couldn’t be determined, though it received a lot of investor interest, according to sources familiar with the property. Delaware is well located along the I-95 corridor and has been a strong location for warehouse-distribution centers although it has been land constrained for those seeking to expand or develop those facilities in the business-friendly state.

The Boxwood Road property is just off of I-95 and has rail running adjacent to it – that attracted a lot of local, regional and national developers to take a look at it for distribution space. Some of the options that were considered included knocking down the entire plant and building anew to converting a portion of the facility into distribution space and reviving a segment for manufacturing.

Representatives from Harvey Hanna weren’t available for interviews. However, in a statement the company said it would reveal more information on its plans in the coming weeks as it formulates them. The deal is expected to close Oct. 25.

“This is an exciting time for our community and for our company,” said E. Thomas Harvey III, president of Harvey Hannah in a statement. “We are confident our vision for this site will create thousands of jobs during construction and thousands more well-paying permanent jobs.”

The real estate company has tackled large redevelopments before including the Twin Spans Business Park in New Castle, Del. That 135-acre property had 2 million square feet of former manufacturing space. Harvey Hanna turned it into a warehouse, distribution and office campus that is now fully leased with more than 1,000 people working from it.
https://www.bizjournals.com/philadel...n-del-cre.html
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  #1924  
Old Posted Oct 9, 2017, 7:13 PM
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With rebrand underway, Georgia food processor plans to double workforce in Chesco

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A Georgia-based company pegged as the country's largest provider of high pressure processing and cold storage services has rebranded to accommodate companywide growth.

Company officials now have eyes on its two-year-old facility in Chester County, with the goal of the doubling its local workforce.

Villa Rica, Ga.-based Universal Pasteurization has four U.S. locations, in Georgia, Nebraska, Texas and Pennsylvania, where it operates 170,000 square feet of office and processing facility space at 8 Lee Blvd. in Malvern, Pa.

Universal entered the lease on the Chester County space in 2015, receiving a funding proposal from the state department of community and economic development.

It's owned by private equity firm Graham Partners, which is based in Newtown Square in Delaware County.

Universal Pasteurization is now known as Universal Pure after a rebranding meant to provide a platform to communicate the benefits of high pressure processing with food and beverage manufacturers, retailers and food service companies, CEO Mark A. Duffy told the Philadelphia Business Journal.

The rebrand will have implications on the Malvern facility.

Privately-held, Universal Pure did not disclose revenue figures, including revenue growth since opening the Malvern facility. Duffy said Universal Pure will focus on resources to help customers grow their business.

As it does, "we are expecting that to drive double-digit growth for Universal Pure, company-wide and specifically at our Malvern site," Duffy said.

"Beyond that, we plan to take leadership roles in the markets we serve, educating the market about the opportunities and technical applications of HPP and supporting companies to leverage the benefits of high pressure processing with safe, quality foods and beverages," Duffy added.

Universal Pure on Monday announced it hired Tom Pontikes as a business development executive.

He will be responsible for growing Universal Pure’s national food service presence, with a particular emphasis on the Malvern facility.

Pontikes has worked for companies like Kellogg Company, McCormick & Co., McDonald’s Corp. and Conagra Brands, which owns Reddi Whip, P.F. Chang's and Hunt's.

There's "great opportunity" to support Philadelphia-region food and beverage companies served by Universal's Malvern facility, he said.

"The Universal Pure leadership team has decided it is a very good time to invest in sales talent and operations talent to staff our Malvern facility," Pontikes said.

Universal Pure is actively hiring to support the business growth in Greater Philadelphia.

"We expect to double our current staffing in Malvern by the end of the year, which will put our headcount at approximately 75 people working for Universal Pure in Malvern," CEO Duffy said.

The Malvern facility was a multimillion dollar project; the company in 2015 said it would invest nearly $11 million into the facility, with the help of state grant money.

Cold-pressed juice company Lumi in June this year moved its headquarters from Virginia to a space within Universal Pure's facility, where Lumi will use Universal's high pressure machine.
https://www.bizjournals.com/philadel...rn-hiring.html
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  #1925  
Old Posted Oct 9, 2017, 7:22 PM
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Originally Posted by summersm343 View Post
A campus transformed: Rowan's groundbreaking $100M gift, 25 years later



https://www.bizjournals.com/philadel...niversary.html
South Jersey's educational options still lag North Jersey's though. Rutgers-Camden, Rowan, and Stockton are really the only South Jersey in-state options, still. And Rowan doesn't really have the national profile of West Chester (much less e.g. U. Del.).
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  #1926  
Old Posted Oct 9, 2017, 8:39 PM
iheartphilly iheartphilly is offline
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Originally Posted by hammersklavier View Post
South Jersey's educational options still lag North Jersey's though. Rutgers-Camden, Rowan, and Stockton are really the only South Jersey in-state options, still. And Rowan doesn't really have the national profile of West Chester (much less e.g. U. Del.).
^It's the other way around. West Chester University is consider a regional university whereas Rowan University is a national university.
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  #1927  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2017, 2:48 AM
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Why do some think Philly can't compete with cities like Austin for tech/business talent? Much larger population base with more than one noteworthy college in the region--Penn, Temple, Drexel, Villanova, UDel, and a handful of elite liberal arts colleges in the MSA. Not to mention Princeton, Rutgers, and NYC universities within easy interviewing distance.

Philly also has reasonable winters (relative to other competitor cities like Chicago, Boston, Minneapolis, Toronto). One of the most historic, walkable, transit-accessible cities in the country. Sites ready to build near the heart of the city. Reasonable cost of living. Nice suburbs for those that don't want the city. I had no personal ties to the region before moving here (Wilmington) a couple months ago, so I don't consider myself all that biased. I just don't see what cities like Austin offer that Philly doesn't, other than possibly better tax benefits and MAYBE cheaper COL. I wouldn't say Philly is THE clear front runner in the Amazon Sweepstakes, but it has a very impressive resume.

Re: Wilmington. I agree that what it really needs is a growing downtown population. Having searched for rental options here recently, I can say the options are very limited. No wonder people commute. If Wilmington can improve housing options for young professionals and families, and reduce crime/perception of crime, it'll be a very attractive place to live and the rest (businesses, restaurants, etc) will come. As others have pointed out, there are some top-level companies and employers here already on a level that's pretty impressive for a city of its size.
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  #1928  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2017, 12:07 PM
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Originally Posted by hammersklavier View Post
South Jersey's educational options still lag North Jersey's though. Rutgers-Camden, Rowan, and Stockton are really the only South Jersey in-state options, still. And Rowan doesn't really have the national profile of West Chester (much less e.g. U. Del.).
NJ has far more people so it's not surprising it has more universities. Rowan has elevated its stature in a major way in 25 years.
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  #1929  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2017, 12:20 PM
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So it seems like many people are saying that all these apartments in Wilmington are supposedly in the path to help Wilmington with offices. But how? Yes we want to work hard to gain population and to get rid of crime, but these apartments seem to be doing none of that. I'm just so confused. I also wonder when do you think Wilmington could see another office boom?
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  #1930  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2017, 3:57 PM
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So it seems like many people are saying that all these apartments in Wilmington are supposedly in the path to help Wilmington with offices. But how? Yes we want to work hard to gain population and to get rid of crime, but these apartments seem to be doing none of that. I'm just so confused. I also wonder when do you think Wilmington could see another office boom?
Because if people live in a place, eventually they'll want to work there too.

In Philly, the residential multi-family market in many ways preceded the office market. Yes, Philly has always had a large CBD but only in recent years have you seen companies opening branch offices (mostly from the suburbs) explicitly because they are having a hard time attracting talent. Explicitly, they acknowledge, there are certain people (usually young tech talent) who literally refuse to commute to the suburbs for work.

There was a time, not that long ago, where many buildings in Center City had no life above street level. Where literally, there was a store (or a restaurant) on the ground floor and nothing above. I think today, you'd be hard pressed to find a building without residential on the top floors literally anywhere in Center City.

So if you make Wilmington a more attractive place to live, the rest will follow.
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  #1931  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2017, 9:55 PM
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^It's the other way around. West Chester University is consider a regional university whereas Rowan University is a national university.
Rowan and U. Del are in the same boat IMO. West Chester is a flagship of the PASSHE system, and (especially as Temple is growing into an increasingly exclusive school) will almost certainly see its profile raised as students that would have formerly been Temple's wind up there.
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  #1932  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2017, 1:18 AM
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The Philly Area's Industrial Buildings Are All But Full

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Greater Philadelphia's industrial market is still the top sector for commercial real estate in the area, but it is crying out for new supply.

Although rents continue to rise, vacancy rates rose slightly across the Philadelphia area in the third quarter, according to a CBRE report. Rather than portending a tipping point for the market, the vacancy uptick is a "small blip" in a growing market, CBRE Director of Research Ian Anderson said.

Industrial vacancy in Greater Philadelphia was at 5.4% in Q3, a number that is just about as low as it can go, according to Anderson. The small increase was due to four new deliveries in the market, all in South Jersey, some of which was not fully occupied. The rate is significantly lower than it was in Q3 2016, when vacancy was 8.1%.

South Jersey has been the only viable area near Philadelphia for larger-format buildings, part of why it has been nearly as heavily targeted by industrial users and investors as the Lehigh Valley. The other part has nothing to do with Philly at all.

“The thing about South Jersey, especially Burlington County, that’s causing the market to heat up has to be attributed to New York City," Anderson said. "It’s the widening of the [New Jersey] Turnpike, the increasing demand for space, and it’s affecting South Jersey and the Lehigh Valley.”

South Jersey's rents are among the highest in the region, and continue to rise even as construction far outpaces Philly's Pennsylvania suburbs. It begs the question: Is the market in danger of being overheated?

“It’s a perfectly reasonable question, but the answer so far is no, based on the data we’re looking at, our brokers on the ground and the growing economy," Anderson said. "In the near term, the demand is still there to fill all of this space, and it surprises even us.”

Though New Castle County in Delaware has the space and the government support to be more competitive with South Jersey — and saw the only speculative industrial property in the market to break ground in the last quarter — the rest of the area looks to be more focused on last-mile facilities going forward. Until those get built, space will be at a premium.

Industrial buildings in both Bucks and Chester counties were less than 3% vacant in Q3, as competition with other sectors for land, and resistance from suburban communities to increased truck traffic, have hampered developers' ability to build industrial in areas suited for last-mile facilities, such as highway-adjacent King of Prussia.

“There’s such little space available in the [Pennsylvania] suburbs of Philly, and anecdotally, when new space does come on, or someone retrofits space, there’s strong demand," Anderson said. "Many times a potential tenant is not as concerned about price, they just need it."

Philadelphia could stand to benefit from the challenges facing its suburbs, with available land and out-of-use industrial buildings near highways in North Philadelphia seeming like ideal spots for last-mile distribution. But there has not been any activity there yet.

“I think it’s probably in the beginning stages — there’s some activity in West Philadelphia, and I’d expect to see more of it," Anderson said. "But the city's market is a bit of a laggard, so it will be a bit longer before it keeps up.”
From: https://www.bisnow.com/philadelphia/...-vacancy-80078
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  #1933  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2017, 1:42 PM
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List of Cities Least Likely to Land Amazon HQ2

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Amazon, as you may have heard, needs another base of operations. Rather than pick the best geographic location, Jeff Bezos dangled a substantial carrot in front of North America’s metropolitan centers: $5 billion in investment, and up to 50,000 jobs.

Over 100 urban centers have already bent over backwards to submit their most enticing proposals to Amazon in the hopes that favorable subsidies, tax breaks, regulation reform or whatever else Big Orange wants will coax the Seattle-based megacorp to kickstart local economies blighted by financial crises, a withering manufacturing sector, and the scourge of the “gig” economy which Amazon itself has had no small part in fostering.

New York alone has pitched Brooklyn, the Bronx, Long Island, Albany, Buffalo, and Syracuse; California happily vies to host Bezos in Concord, San Jose, Oakland, Sacramento, Long Beach, or Irvine. Atlanta, Denver, Baltimore, Dallas, and Pittsburgh are also considered strong contenders. Experts and pundits have weighed in on which city would prove the most advantageous (for Amazon), with list after list after list of frontrunners piling up ahead of the October 19th due date—but this is not one those lists.

Some cities, have thrown themselves—out of desperation or to simply cash in on some easy PR from the local news—into a fight they seem all but destined to lose. Most of these places don’t even come close to meeting Amazon’s proposal requirements.

Here are the cities that, while highly unlikely to win Amazon’s favor, are showing the kind of moxy needed to crowd a field of wanton, race-to-the-bottom bidding likely to further income inequality in America.
Read More - https://gizmodo.com/the-8-cities-lea...uar-1818581872

(None of the Philly Metro cities are on this list)
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  #1934  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2017, 1:45 PM
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Cities Most Likely to Land Amazon HQ2

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Amazon plans to open a second North American headquarters in addition to its original headquarters in Seattle. The retailer promised 50,000 jobs and $5 billion in capital expenditures for the city that proves it has the best assets and incentives.

The floodgates opened.

It seems as though every mayor in every city in America has declared a bid to be Amazon’s next headquarters. Some have more promise than others.

We created a select list of cities with over a million people that have a chance of getting Amazon’s attention. We compared them on a number of criteria, including tech talent, airport travel time, office prices, housing costs and population. Take a look:
Read More - https://www.recode.net/2017/9/9/1627...d-headquarters

(Philly is on the list!)
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  #1935  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2017, 1:48 PM
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Those articles are like a month old. Philly is on some lists and not on others. Honestly, there's really nothing much else to say until Amazon makes their decision next year (or confirms what they've already privately decided).
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  #1936  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2017, 3:05 PM
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Wilmington: Christina River Bike/Ped Bridge

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So insanely excited for this to open



Photo via Bike Delaware



Christina bike bridge to open unused pathways
http://www.delawareonline.com/story/...ways/91238856/

a 345-foot wooden bridge across the Christina River is set to break ground next month and when complete will be the "crown jewel" of Delaware's non-motorized trails, unleashing a flood of bicycle commuters into Wilmington, say transportation officials.

"There could be times when congestion on I-95 is so bad that someone could get from New Castle to the Wilmington Riverfront faster on a bike," said Jeff Niezgoda, a planning supervisor for the state Department of Transportation.

The $18.5 million project includes the arched crossing just east of I-95, a smaller bridge across Little Mill Creek leading to the Wilmington Riverfront and 2,300-foot boardwalk across marshland to link the two. To the south, it will connect with a 1.4-mile path opened in 2014, which leads to another trail system that stretches to Old New Castle.

The bridge is the last link of a system that has been built gradually and creates a nearly uninterrupted pathway between Wilmington and New Castle.
Update on this from the Bike Delaware Facebook page... starting to look like the real thing!

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  #1937  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2017, 4:17 PM
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Originally Posted by hammersklavier View Post
Rowan and U. Del are in the same boat IMO. West Chester is a flagship of the PASSHE system, and (especially as Temple is growing into an increasingly exclusive school) will almost certainly see its profile raised as students that would have formerly been Temple's wind up there.
UD does not consider itself to be in that boat at all. It considers itself to be a "Public Ivy" on par with say, Rutgers.
And with an endowment of over $1.2 billion (More than Rutgers, and #80 in the country) -- I think you are selling the old Blue Hens a bit short.

https://thebestschools.org/features/...sity-research/
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  #1938  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 12:09 PM
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Hotel sign is up



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Originally Posted by domodeez View Post
Second sign is up - this one's above the main entrance on Market Street

Did they change the design of the hotel? Because it looks nothing like the rendering:



At lease as of now, the current product looks ugly compared to the rendering imo. I hope they are still going with the rendering design.

Last edited by jonesrmj; Oct 13, 2017 at 12:26 PM.
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  #1939  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2017, 4:56 PM
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Wilmington Brew Works

Coming soon: Wilmington's first production brewery in 64 years

http://www.delawareonline.com/story/...ars/753869001/







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This spring... a new production microbrewery called Wilmington Brew Works will open on Miller Road at the long-dormant former site of the Harper-Thiel Electroplating Co., a restored brownfield.

Fresh beer in the tasting room, live music and perhaps a restaurant are expected to fill the 2.3-acre site, which will retain its iconic Spanish colonial-style look and red tile roof.

...Wilmington Brew Works will be canning its 500 barrels of beer a year in a portion of the 11,000-square-foot building. The brews will be on draft at the brewery and the cans are expected to eventually be available at liquor stores and restaurants.

"It's going to be a whole new beer scene for Delaware," says Wilmington Brew Works owner/brewer Craig Wensell, formerly of Bellefonte Brewing Co. "We're going to make a little history for Wilmington.

"One of the things that shocked me and all of my friends in the brewing industry is just that statement. What major city in the United States can you go to now and say we're the first [production] brewery in the city limits in 60 years? There's no city left where that's the case."

In the half-century since Diamond State's demise, a few breweries have come and gone within the city limits with Iron Hill Brewery now standing as the city's lone brewery. Another newcomer, Stitch House Brewery, is expected to open sometime later this year on Market Street near The Grand, adding to the city's locally-sourced offerings.

In late 2015, the Wilmington Urban Development Action Grant Corp., a quasi-governmental agency that holds abandoned brownfield projects while they are cleaned up, sold the property for $240,000 to Ralph and Rose Pepe.

The Talleyville couple also owns the 57,000-square-foot retail center Talleyville Towne Shoppes at Concord Pike and Silverside Road, along with Concord Pike Liquors.

The Pepes are leasing space to Wilmington Brew Works and are currently accepting inquiries from prospective restaurant partners, eyeing an eatery to complement the brewery. A food hall — a more modern, upscale reincarnation of the food court — could also fit, he says.

Patrons will be able to drink on an outdoor front patio, taking in a view of Haynes Park and listening to atmospheric live music, says Wensell, a former music professor and high school music teacher who founded his old brewery, Bellefonte Brewing Co., in his Bellefonte home as a brewing supply business in 2014.

From the street, passersby will see the stainless steel fermentation tanks in the front windows. Located in an area of the city with little to no nightlife or restaurants, this desert is about to get an oasis — a beer-filled oasis.

The Northern Delaware Greenway Trail, used both by bikers and for nature walks, passes right by the brewery and Wensell hopes the brewery will become a pit stop for its users.
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Old Posted Oct 14, 2017, 1:20 AM
domodeez domodeez is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Wilmington
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Wilmington Stitch House Brewery

Speaking of Wilmington breweries, here's a shot from today of drywall being lifted up through a 3rd floor window for the apartments above Stitch House Brewery, which opens soon in the heart of Market Street:

http://stitchhousebrewery.com

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