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  #281  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2008, 9:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newflyer View Post
Wow!! ... thats going to be great to see.

3 more weeks....
Just in time for the first snow.
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  #282  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2008, 11:51 PM
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forum glitch finaly fixed it self\

------

maybe not perhaps it will be clear of snow... but does not mean we havent had snow fall by that point
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  #283  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2008, 11:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ILYR View Post
Just in time for the first snow.


LOL .... well not if I'm lucky, but I would have prefered to visit during the summer.
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  #284  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2008, 12:07 AM
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Originally Posted by newflyer View Post
LOL .... well not if I'm lucky, but I would have prefered to visit during the summer.
hahah

november 6 2006


november 20th 2006

Last edited by 1ajs; Oct 13, 2008 at 12:22 AM.
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  #285  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2008, 12:36 AM
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hahah

november 6 2006


november 20th 2006
Well that doesn't look too bad...
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  #286  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2008, 1:14 AM
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indeed
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  #287  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2008, 4:44 PM
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Battle brews over future of Exchange District house
Last Updated: Tuesday, October 14, 2008 | 11:14 AM CT
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/st...lly-house.html
CBC News

One of the last remaining houses in Winnipeg's Exchange District had a controversial past — and its future could be controversial as well.

The Kelly House at 88 Adelaide Street was built in the 1880s by Michael Kelly, whose family's firm won the contract to build the Manitoba legislature. The family later lost the house following a construction corruption scandal.

Kelly House on Adelaide Street, seen in a photo from a 1979 city report. Kelly House on Adelaide Street, seen in a photo from a 1979 city report. (City of Winnipeg)The person who now owns the house wants the city to remove its Grade III status as a heritage building, arguing it has deteriorated too much to be refurbished.

"I'm really upset because it's another classic case of an owner hanging onto a property, has no intentions of using it or refurbishing it and will not sell it," said Cindy Tugwell, spokeswoman for Heritage Winnipeg, a non-profit organization promoting building preservation.

The current owner, David Rich, bought the home about 15 years ago, and it's been empty for almost a decade.

Rich, who chose not to do a taped interview with CBC News, said the house is in terrible shape and would cost too much to refurbish. It's been broken into several times and most of the copper pipes are gone.

Tugwell said she has tried to approach Rich about selling, but he has refused — another example of what she calls "demolition by neglect."

"We've had many requests over the years from a private individual or a developer wanting to purchase the property," she said.

"Why do these property owners allow this to happen to these beautiful properties? Why would you want to own a historic property and not want to do something with it?"
'Moderately significant'

Kelly House, built in the Queen Anne Style with brick veneer, has "gingerbread trim," including decorative verge boards displaying a sunburst pattern, and is "an isolated and lonely reminder of the comfortable residential neighbourhood which once grew up near Winnipeg's City Hall," according to Heritage Winnipeg.

The house's Grade III heritage designation identifies it as a "moderately significant heritage example worthy of listing," according to the city's website. "Suitable exterior alterations and modifications may be permitted. There is usually no restriction on interior alterations."

The city's historic buildings committee meets on Thursday to consider the request to de-list the buidling. Chairwoman Jenny Gerbasi said the committee will review engineering reports, as well as other issues.

"It's the story of the place," she said. "It's not only the physical structure, it's the context of the building."

Gerbasi said the city can't force a private owner to refurbish a building. However, it can deny an application to de-list a building, and it can prevent the issuance of a permit for a listed building's demolition.

Tugwell wishes the city could force an owner to sell, adding that she won't give up on Kelly House easily.

"I'll fight pretty hard for this one," she said.
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  #288  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2008, 6:31 PM
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used to know someone who lived in that house lol i was around 4 oe 5 when i was inthere was a neat house it needed a fair bit of work even then but aslong as the foundation and roof are good one can gut and restore a place like that

if the city did seaze it i hope someone with money buys it fixs it and lives in it!
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  #289  
Old Posted Oct 14, 2008, 9:14 PM
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^ exactly. It's a house. This isn't rocket science. Go in there, gut it, replace the rotten stuff, re wire it, put in new plumbing and a furnace and do your drywall.

There are guys in Wolesley that do this with their buddies over a couple weeks.
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  #290  
Old Posted Oct 15, 2008, 3:31 AM
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the kelly house has hardwood floors all threw it and the 1920's tile in the bathrooms its a gem of a house its a shame it got broken into and trashed for coper
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  #291  
Old Posted Oct 15, 2008, 4:22 AM
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  #292  
Old Posted Oct 21, 2008, 3:26 AM
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From the Black Rod:

Sunday, October 19, 2008
Food donated for the poor directed to Free Press strikers

We don't know what's more shameful -- the fact that striking Winnipeg Free Press employees took food out of the mouths of poor people, or the fact that they're so arrogrant they boasted about it.

Barely five days after walking off their extremely well-paid jobs, the strikers snickered about their coup on their strike website, www.freepressonstrike.com:

Food bank volunteer donates pork to picketers
Oct 17, 2008
A man who delivers donations for the Winnipeg Harvest food bank dropped off a half-ton truck full of frozen minced pork at Free Press striking workers Friday .

The man drove up to the picket line around 11 a.m. with the surprising and generous donation: in total, 1,500 pounds of ground pork in one-pound packages.

“Winnipeg Harvest had a surplus and they asked me if I could get rid of it,” said the food bank volunteer. “I heard it might be a long haul here so I came here,” the man said.

The volunteer who didn’t want his name used.

The province’s biggest food bank appealed for donations last week when supplies ran low.

The appeal drew hundreds of donations, including the frozen meat.

One thousand workers with the Communication,Energy and Paper Workers Union walked off the job five days ago on Thanksgiving Day to protest management demands for cuts to wages and benefits.

Talks are continuing but both sides are reported to be far apart.

“On behalf of all the members at the Winnipeg Free Press, we’re grateful,” said one picketer who expressed thanks for all the workers.

Five days after stopping work the strikers scooped more than a thousand pounds of food away from the needy. They excuse it by saying the food was surplus. That's funny, that's not what Winnipeg Harvest was saying one week earlier.

Cupboard nearly bare at Winnipeg Harvest
Last Updated: Friday, October 10, 2008 10:26 AM CT
CBC News
Winnipeg Harvest has only a week's worth of food on its shelves, a result of the growing economic uncertainty, officials say.

"We've probably got enough food in the food bank for about seven days, so we can get us to next week," said executive coordinator David Northcott.

"We've not been this thin for a quite a while," he added. "I'm not certain we've ever been this light on food."

The food bank, the largest in the province, has taken steps to reduce the amount of food given in emergency hampers from a five-day supply to four, Northcott said.

Lo and behold, suddenly they have so much food they have to give it to the employees of the Winnipeg Free Press.

There aren't words to express our disgust.

Reporters and columnists are paid between $70,000 and $90,000 a year, and here they are claiming charity.

The Winnipeg Free Press strikers saw nothing wrong with cutting ahead of these Winnipeg Harvest clients (from the Harvest website):

· 118 food banks,
· 30 day cares, mostly inner city,
· 9 community kitchens, where low-income people cook together and take home prepared food,
· 102 community organizations for children and youth as well as school meal programs that depend on Winnipeg Harvest to provide up to 100% of their snack or meal needs, and
· 10 soup kitchens serving soup and meals to those who are hungry on the street or have no other resources for their food needs

Let's be absolutely clear. The Winnipeg Free Press employees aren't needy. They voluntarily left their jobs and their fat paycheques. They made a choice. And they have to live with that choice.

The people who depend on Winnipeg Harvest don't have the choice of going to work for $70,000 a year.

It was barely a few weeks ago that these same employees (step up, Gordon Sinclair Jr., Geoff Kirbyson, Bartley Kives) were lecturing Mayor Sam Katz about ethics.

Well, what are the ethics of rich, pompous journalists taking food away from the poor because, well, just because they want to and they can. Where's Artie Schaefer and the other university egg-heads who love pontificating about ethics in the press.

Hey, Art, let's hear how it's just and proper for the well-off to take food out of the mouths of poor kids. We'll all ears.

Is there a single mainstream reporter out there who will ask Winnipeg Harvest executive director David Northcott about his sudden surplus of food? Will any reporter go to any of the agencies that get food form Winnipeg Harvest and ask they why they suddenly don't need any donations? Wouldn't that be a lovely good news story?

Of course, there's the hard-news angle for reporters who want something with more bite.

Let's start with where the half-ton of pork came from. Are the Winnipeg Free Press strikers being subsidized by the taxpayer?
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  #293  
Old Posted Oct 21, 2008, 8:45 PM
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Car-theft battle nets kudos

By: Paul Samyn

Updated: October 21 at 02:48 PM CDT

Winnipeg’s war on car thieves has been lauded by the Conference Board of Canada as a new model for addressing the causes of crime.

In a report the think-tank released today, Winnipeg’s success in reversing its reputation as the auto theft capital of North America is dissected as a crime-fighting lesson that other cities can learn from.

“Many Canadians would be surprised to learn that Canada has relatively high crime levels compared to some other developed countries, particularly with respect to property crime. Based on Winnipeg’s efforts to reduce auto theft, an evidence-based approach to crime prevention holds the greatest promise for making communities safer,” Rick Linden, who wrote the report and is co-chair of the Manitoba Auto Theft Task Force, said in a release.

“This approach addresses the causes of crime, rather than focusing exclusively on either ‘law-and-order’ measures or social programs.”

The Conference Board study documents how Winnipeg`s auto-theft rate skyrocketed in the 1990s, leaving Winnipeg with the highest rates in North America from 2003-2006.

Linden, a University of Manitoba sociologist, said tackling the problem required authorities to understand why auto theft had become part of youth culture in some areas of the city and whether the stolen vehicles were being used for joy rides or temporary transportation.

``Successfully reducing crime requires that planners analyze crime and disorder problems, determine likely causes of those problems ,and implement programs that address those causes. Unless interventions are substantial and sustained, there is almost no chance they will be effective,`` the report said.

By controlling high-rate offenders through curfews, introducing immoblizers and introducing programs to address the root cases of crime, thefts have nose-dived.

According to the Winnipeg Police Service, auto thefts dropped by 27 per cent in 2007, to their lowest level since 2001. However attempted thefts rose by nine per cent. As well, thefts were down a further 42 per cent in the first nine months of 2008. On average, there are about 10 thefts per day, a 58 per cent drop from the 2004 daily average.
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  #294  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2008, 4:11 PM
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Don't normally agree with Nick Trenette, but nonetheless I admire his passion for civic issues. From today's Sun:


Ternette tossed from city hall

Thu, October 23, 2008
By PAUL TURENNE, SUN MEDIA

It was a historic day at city hall: rapid transit finally won official approval and longtime social activist Nick Ternette was kicked out of the chamber for the first time.

As Coun. Jenny Gerbasi stood discussing Ottawa's experience with bus rapid transit yesterday afternoon during the pre-vote debate, Ternette -- a regular fixture at City Hall meetings -- yelled out "Bulls---!" then added "Ottawa is LRT (light rail transit) all the way!"

Speaker Harry Lazarenko immediately ordered a security guard to escort Ternette from the gallery, offering up "Nick, you should know better."

Afterwards, Ternette said it was the first time in 40 years he'd been kicked out of city hall.

"Normally I don't have any problem with people standing up for their own beliefs, but I do have a problem when people lie," said Ternette.

Ternette said he believes a new LRT expansion in Ottawa proves bus rapid transit has been a failure there, and took issue with Gerbasi touting Ottawa's BRT as a success.

"I was just stating the facts as I understand them," Gerbasi said. "In fact (Ottawa) has an extensive BRT network that's considered quite successful."

The $138-million rapid transit plan passed by a 13-1 count, with Coun. Scott Fielding opposing it.

Meanwhile, council approved a five cent hike in transit fares to $2.30 per ride. However, the hike came with a motion tabled by Coun. Mike Pagtakhan and seconded by Mayor Sam Katz to have the city explore the possibility of providing cut-rate fares to low-income people at all times, and to everyone at off-peak hours.

"It's about doing the right thing and helping out," Pagtakhan said. "It may also increase ridership."

Pagtakhan said Winnipeg could do something similar to Calgary, where riders who earn up to 75% of Stats Canada's low-income cut off mark qualify for a reduced-rate pass. He said something around half-price could work in Winnipeg.

Pagtakhan didn't know how many transit riders might qualify for the discount.

The off-peak fare would apply outside of morning and afternoon rush hours, and serve to help fill buses Pagtakhan says are relatively empty at other times.
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  #295  
Old Posted Oct 24, 2008, 4:08 PM
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From Scranton to Winnipeg: The Office goes north

Winnipeg is about to take a star turn in the offbeat TV comedy The Office.

An episode scheduled to air Nov. 13 has star Steve Carell, in his role as office manager Michael Scott, taking a business trip to the windy capital of Manitoba.

Emmy-winning writer Brent Forrester chose Winnipeg as a suitable destination for the cringe-inducing boss of fictional paper firm Dunder Mifflin.

"It seemed like Montreal was maybe too exotic and Vancouver also a little maybe too conventionally sexy, and Winnipeg seemed to strike the right balance between exotic and obscure," he told CBC News in an interview from Los Angeles. More...

Olympic torch to come through Winnipeg?

A city councillor is calling on his colleagues to agree to spend up to $100,000 to bring the 2010 Olympic torch relay to Winnipeg.

Coun. Grant Nordman says the Olympic organizing committee has asked Winnipeg to host events as the torch makes its way across Canada to Vancouver for the Winter Games.

"They would like Winnipeg to be among the capital cities across the provinces that hosts an Olympic torch run," he said.

Nordman asked city council at Wednesday's meeting to agree to spend up to $100,000 to support a "civic celebration" related to the torch's arrival in Winnipeg in January 2010. More...


The Olympic Torch would be a nice touch, could go well with the Manitoba Homecoming 2010 festivities.
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  #296  
Old Posted Oct 24, 2008, 4:15 PM
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indeed it would be a nice tuch


bahaha @ Ternette u don't shout out bullshit in a councle chamber like that.... its just not done...
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  #297  
Old Posted Oct 24, 2008, 4:20 PM
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Read an interesting article explaining the high crime and homicide rates in Western Canada. It reminded me of what I wrote recently in our MB Prov Politics thread:

I find the whole "tough on crime" position to be narrow-minded. I'm still waiting for some academic or peer-reviewed journal to indicate that tougher sentences reduces crime. In actuality, we find correlations of crime in areas where there is also high levels of poverty, unemployment, and school drop-outs. I'm of the opinion that to "fix crime" we must address these vital problems in our society. So, I'm believe that "tough on crime" is a narrow-minded two-second soundbite, appealing to those who don't understand the effort and time it will take to fundamentally improve the conditions that lead to crime.

Do you think that the street-gang kids on streets like Selkirk and Sargent will think twice because of some tougher sentence? Or, if we raise the level of their quality of life, education, and offer them all the same potential for a bright future that kids in suburban areas enjoy... would that not be the better solution? Sure, it'll take a long time, and "tough on crime" appeals to simpletons who want what they want "right now!" The problem with this more altruistic idea, is how do you boil it down to a two-second soundbite that conveys the concept? How do you convey a complex idea to the average person who will only read a few bullet-points?


Anyway, IMO, it is vital that the living and social conditions among Aboriginals and on First Nations reservations be improved. This article points that the homicide rate is seven times higher in the Aboriginal population, as opposed to the non-Aboriginal population. A very telling stat that we must do all we can to improve their lives and provide them opportunities to reduce the chance that they may join a gang. However, all of this must be done in a culturally sensitive way.

Can you tell this is an issue that I feel strongly about?

Blah blah blah, I'll stop preaching... here's the article:

Rough and ready: Why are homicide rates high in the West?

Thursday, October 23, 2008 | 5:44 PM CT
by Cheryl Krawchuk, CBC News


Canada's homicide rate dropped in 2007, continuing a downward trend that started in the mid-1970s, says a Statistics Canada report published Thursday. Police reported 594 homicides last year, 12 fewer than in 2006.

Homicide rates fell in most provinces — with Manitoba the most glaring exception. The province had 62 homicides, an increase of 23 over a year earlier.

"The 2007 rate in Manitoba (5.22 per cent) was the highest among all the provinces and the highest in that province since statistics were first collected in 1961," said the report.

Among major cities, Winnipeg led with 3.55 homicides per 100,000 people.

Canada's western provinces — particularly Manitoba and Saskatchewan — have consistently reported the country's highest homicide rates. CBCNews.ca spoke with Michael Weinrath, the chair of the University of Winnipeg's criminal justice department and associate professor of criminal justice, about why the West consistently leads the country in homicides.

'Rough and ready'

Weinrath says it's a truism that violence increases in the shift westward.

"There's been different explanations. Some people say there's more of a frontier mentality out in the West," Weinrath says. "As the years go by, that seems to have become a less tenable argument."

The West has traditionally been home to more "rough and ready" types, says Weinrath, many recruited to fill the region's workforce.

"Winnipeg, although it's a very progressive city with lots of arts and culture, some people would also describe it as a very blue-collar city."

British Columbia, while perhaps perceived as a little less rough and tumble, has its own issues, he says.

"[Vancouver is] a port city and so it has all kinds of criminal activity there because it's a port entrance for drugs and that kind of thing."

Urban violence

Winnipeg, Edmonton and Calgary were the cities with the highest homicide rates, the report says. Weinrath says homicides are often concentrated in impoverished, downtown areas.

"Generally you have some pretty poor areas in those cities, often disadvantaged minorities in those cities," he says. "The homicide rate is seven times higher in the aboriginal population than it is in the Caucasian population, and that's a figure you can use nationally."

The large aboriginal population in the Prairie provinces probably has an influence on the homicide rate, Weinrath says.

Guns, drugs and gangs

One in five homicides reported in 2007 was gang-related, says Statistics Canada. Saskatchewan had the highest proportion of gang-related homicides of all the provinces — 30 per cent.

In Weinrath's hometown, Winnipeg, five homicides were gang-related. The city is having the same issues as other large Canadian cities, he says.

"One of the things that's happening is part of a national trend and that is that we're seeing more homicides connected with the deadly nexus — guns, drugs and gangs.

"We seem to have more firearm activity … drive-by shootings where people are just shooting through windows. As you have these sorts of conflicts, some of our homicides seem to be connected, not always to gangs, but definitely to the drug trade. That's a trend we've seen in the city and it's part of a national trend."

Rural violence

Most of the increase in Manitoba's homicide rate this year took place in small urban and rural areas, says Statistics Canada. Weinrath says rural gang activity is part of the problem.

"Compared to 10 years ago, a higher percentage of homicides can be attributed to the drug trade," he says.

Weinrath says the biggest issue contributing to an increase in rural homicides in Manitoba is the extreme poverty on many aboriginal reserves.

"We have reserves where you have to fly in, where there's no real source of income or jobs for most aboriginal people. And I think that … you sort of hit a critical mass and suddenly these problems just sort of bubble over," he says.

"The phenomena in the rural area is a concern. I think police intelligence activity in the rural areas can do something to curtail the gang activity. With some of the things that are happening in the impoverished rural areas, I mean, those are social issues that governments need to take action on."

Handgun use on rise

While Canadians were equally at risk of being shot or stabbed last year (188 people were shot; 190 were stabbed), the use of handguns in homicides is on the rise, says Statistics Canada. Of the 188 firearms used to commit homicide in 2007, two-thirds were handguns — 16 more than a year earlier.

Weinrath says the rise in handgun use is worrisome.

"It's connected … the drugs, the gangs. Suddenly people have firearms in their hands and they want to resolve these conflicts. It's just harder to kill people with your bare hands or a knife than it is with a handgun. And of course, a handgun's easier to conceal."

Excluded from prosperity

Economic prosperity on the Prairies hasn't helped decrease violence, Weinrath says.

"Both Manitoba and Saskatchewan have both done very well economically. The unemployment rates are tiny," he says. "We have all this prosperity on the Prairies and we have a hard time engaging our low-income groups. And it's not just aboriginals; I mean, some of our immigrant population, Africans from Somalia, Congo … some of them have become involved in gangs."

Despite the rise in Manitoba, homicides remain statistically rare in Canada, Weinrath says.

"You'll see years where it goes up but it sort of averages out across the country."

Last edited by DowntownWpg; Oct 24, 2008 at 4:37 PM.
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  #298  
Old Posted Oct 25, 2008, 1:05 AM
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I'm pumped for that episode of "The Office"...even though the filming is all done in LA...
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  #299  
Old Posted Oct 25, 2008, 5:21 AM
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Is the boyfriend (the one who beat her and up and who she had a restraining order against) still outwitting the Portage cops?
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  #300  
Old Posted Oct 27, 2008, 4:23 AM
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From the Black Rod:

Winnipeg Free Press strikers jumped the queue for free pork

Striking employees of the Winnipeg Free Press are at the apex of a massive cover-up into how government-subsidized food was funnelled into their union strike headquarters instead of being distributed to needy clients of Manitoba food banks.

David Northcott, executive co-ordinator for Winnipeg Harvest, confirmed Thursday to CJOB's morning show host Richard Cloutier that more than half a ton of minced pork received by the strikers' union was from a government program to provide food to the poor.

Northcott said the delivery to the union headquarters was "unauthorized" and that the striking FP employees "did jump the queue" ahead of the disadvantaged and the disabled for whom the food was intended.

In his interview he also made it clear that the strikers are peddling a false story on their strike website about how the food-for-the-poor came into their hands.

The pork was not "surplus", as the strikers claimed at first, nor was it rejected by Winnipeg Harvest because their freezers were full, as the strike website claimed later. Both versions of where the pork came from were attributed to an anonymous "man who delivers donations for the Winnipeg Harvest."

"Nobody at Winnipeg Harvest was driving the truck," said Northcott.

Cloutier was told that Winnipeg Harvest canvassed 3 soup kitchens and 40 hamper programs in Winnipeg which each received more than 1000 pounds of the government pork for their clients.

"No one's giving up the person," Northcott said.

And by "no one", he's including the striking employees of the Winnipeg Free Press who certainly do know who delivered the pork they took home. But mum's the word. The conspiracy of silence stands firm. The union has been stricken with collective amnesia.
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