HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Europe

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
     
     
  #1  
Old Posted Feb 12, 2014, 7:09 PM
New Brisavoine New Brisavoine is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,066
European economy - Économie européenne - Europäische Wirtschaft

The French statistical office INSEE has just published the regional GDP figures for 2012. I'll add other European countries later.

Real GDP growth in 2012:
- French Guiana: +3.3%
- Corsica: +2.0%
- Picardy: +0.8%
- La Réunion: +0.7%
- Aquitaine: +0.7%
- Guadeloupe: +0.6%
- Rhône-Alpes: +0.5%
- Midi-Pyrénées: +0.3%
- Pays de la Loire: +0.2%
- Brittany: +0.2%
- Paris Region: +0.1%
- Lower Normandy: +0.1%
- Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur: +0.1%
- Poitou-Charentes: +0.0%
- Martinique: +0.0%
- Nord-Pas-de-Calais: +0.0%
- Languedoc-Roussillon: -0.1%
- Auvergne: -0.2%
- Burgundy: -0.3%
- Alsace: -0.4%
- Centre: -0.4%
- Limousin: -0.5%
- Lorraine: -1.0%
- Champagne-Ardenne: -1.0%
- Upper Normandy: -1.4%
- Franche-Comté: -1.6%

A map:

__________________
New Axa – New Brisavoine

Last edited by New Brisavoine; Feb 12, 2014 at 7:23 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2  
Old Posted Feb 14, 2014, 8:02 PM
New Brisavoine New Brisavoine is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,066
This graph shows the evolution of the GDP per capita in Germany, France, the UK, and Spain every year since 2007, based on the latest figures published this week. I've also added the United States for comparison. This is the evolution of *real* GDP per capita, i.e. after inflation is deducted.

In 2013, the average inhabitant of Germany was 4.4% better off than in 2007, and the average inhabitant of the USA was 1.0% better off than in 2007. The average inhabitant of France was 2.2% worse off than in 2007, while the average inhabitant of the UK was 5.5% worse off, and the average inhabitant of Spain was 8.6% worse off.

__________________
New Axa – New Brisavoine
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3  
Old Posted Apr 12, 2015, 11:06 PM
JGreat JGreat is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by New Brisavoine View Post
This graph shows the evolution of the GDP per capita in Germany, France, the UK, and Spain every year since 2007, based on the latest figures published this week. I've also added the United States for comparison. This is the evolution of *real* GDP per capita, i.e. after inflation is deducted.

In 2013, the average inhabitant of Germany was 4.4% better off than in 2007, and the average inhabitant of the USA was 1.0% better off than in 2007. The average inhabitant of France was 2.2% worse off than in 2007, while the average inhabitant of the UK was 5.5% worse off, and the average inhabitant of Spain was 8.6% worse off.

I didn´t know the UK was lagging so much behind in Europe, in fact I thought it was leading the economic growth even before germany, btw... how is it that germany had a smaller gdp contraction in 2009?, apart from all the good news in recent years, i thought that germany was the country with the biggest gdp contraction in that year
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4  
Old Posted Apr 13, 2015, 3:36 AM
mousquet's Avatar
mousquet mousquet is offline
that prick
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Nimbyland Paris, Museum France
Posts: 3,062
Angry what?

^ Uh! Hey, were you living under a heavier rock, in a cave or something? Germany's been all over the place for a decade or so. Gerhard Schröder or whatever the weird spelling of his crazy name butchered entire Europe. Hell, I wish that guy could've spoken French. Now their easy conservative Angela is collecting all the yummy fruits of smarter and braver Gerhard... Politics. We all know about this over here now. The local media has been constantly hammered it out like we're so tired of it. That's the fault of our pathetic retarded left wing and their legions of useless sorry technocrats and corporatist little officials hidden in their boring depressing offices that are still 50 years late on the German left wing. It's a well-known fact now.

I'll have no mercy on them.
__________________
psst... A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. (John 13:34)
I like bass. Give me some.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5  
Old Posted Apr 13, 2015, 5:44 AM
JGreat JGreat is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mousquet View Post
^ Uh! Hey, were you living under a heavier rock, in a cave or something? Germany's been all over the place for a decade or so. Gerhard Schröder or whatever the weird spelling of his crazy name butchered entire Europe. Hell, I wish that guy could've spoken French. Now their easy conservative Angela is collecting all the yummy fruits of smarter and braver Gerhard... Politics. We all know about this over here now. The local media has been constantly hammered it out like we're so tired of it. That's the fault of our pathetic retarded left wing and their legions of useless sorry technocrats and corporatist little officials hidden in their boring depressing offices that are still 50 years late on the German left wing. It's a well-known fact now.

I'll have no mercy on them.
--Real GDP growth rate - volumen --

Eurostat

2003-2014

http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/tgm/tab...00115&plugin=1

--Percentage change on previous year--


If you look at the table, germany experienced -5,6% growth in 2009, UK -5,3, France -2,9. (the graphic is wrong?), the UK the next years grew much faster.
It´s not all about politics, the left and right in germany are not too different to other countries in europe, they have a different culture and highly developed tech companies backing the economy,. In fact... if it wasn´t for some germany´s politicians they could be economically much stronger in Europe without the messy euro, I´m not sure if that´s something european countries should be happy about or not
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #6  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2015, 10:22 AM
nito nito is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 2,441
Quote:
Originally Posted by JGreat View Post
I didn´t know the UK was lagging so much behind in Europe, in fact I thought it was leading the economic growth even before germany, btw... how is it that germany had a smaller gdp contraction in 2009?, apart from all the good news in recent years, i thought that germany was the country with the biggest gdp contraction in that year
The UK experienced a severe contraction following the financial crisis, but revisions and solid growth figures have seen the picture change rather dramatically. According to the IMF, in 2014 the UK managed growth of 2.8% which meant it was the fastest growing G7 economy; for contrast Germany expanded by 1.5% and France by a meagre 0.4%.

The following chart shows the GDP recovery of the G7 since the crisis.


Source: Full Fact: https://fullfact.org/economy/uk_fast..._economy-41159

One thing to note is that New Brisavoine’s data is focused on GDP per capita, so population growth (or stagnation) plays an important part in each respective country’s performance.

I haven’t reviewed the latest population and economic data combined, but it could be conceivable that with the strong economic growth of the UK and the ongoing poor performance of France, that the UK has or will later this year surpass France in GDP per capita when referring to 2007 as the base year for comparisons. We do know that since the start of the century, France has lagged behind its peers.

http://www.economist.com/news/specia...s-answer-might

Source: The Economist: http://www.economist.com/news/specia...s-answer-might
__________________
London Transport Thread updated: 2018_06_11
London Stadium & Arena Thread updated: 2018_05_15
London General Update Thread updated: 2018_06_11
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #7  
Old Posted Mar 4, 2014, 10:44 PM
New Brisavoine New Brisavoine is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,066
Enlarging the map in post #1, I've added the German, Spanish, and Italian regions. For the UK, we don't have the 2012 regional growth rates yet, so I've indicated the national growth rate of the whole UK instead.

10 fastest growing regions in 2012:
- French Guiana: +3.3%
- Corsica: +2.0%

- Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania: +1.9%
- City-State of Berlin: +1.2%
- City-State of Hamburg: +1.2%
- City-State of Bremen: +1.2%
- Hesse: +0.9%
- Lower Saxony: +0.9%
- Schleswig-Holstein: +0.9%
- Rhineland-Palatinate: +0.9%


10 fastest declining regions in 2012:
- Liguria: -2.9%
- Apulia: -3.0%
- Marche: -3.1%
- Umbria: -3.1%
- Castile- La Mancha: -3.1%
- Calabria: -3.2%
- Sardinia: -3.4%
- Aosta Valley: -3.5%
- Basilicata: -3.6%
- Sicily: -3.8%


The contrast between the sister islands of Corsica and Sardinia is striking.

__________________
New Axa – New Brisavoine
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #8  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 7:24 PM
Lear's Avatar
Lear Lear is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Europa
Posts: 838
I´m afraid the data-color scheme of the map is of no use.
The colors follow no logic (dark-bright). The map therefore can´t be read properly ….
__________________
Berlin
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #9  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 8:56 PM
Minato Ku's Avatar
Minato Ku Minato Ku is offline
Tokyo and Paris fan
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Paris, Montrouge
Posts: 3,804
I don't see the problem with the colors, I find it pretty understandable at least if you read the legend.
Green = positive growth , Red = negative growth.
Maybe it is the black that disturbs you?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #10  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2014, 12:30 AM
New Brisavoine New Brisavoine is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,066
The color scheme is simple:
GREEN :
WHITE

RED
BLACK

I'll try to make a cumulative one from 2008 to 2012, which is more significant than a single year.
__________________
New Axa – New Brisavoine
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #11  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2014, 2:42 PM
New Brisavoine New Brisavoine is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,066
Ok, here is the map showing cumulative GDP growth rates (inflation deflated) in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012. For the UK this is the cumulative GDP growth rates of the entire country, since we don't have regional figures for 2012 yet.

The regions in green had reached and passed their pre-crisis peak by 2012. The white regions were not far from their pre-crisis peak in 2012. The red regions were still quite some way from their pre-crisis peak, and the black regions were beyond despair.

10 fastest growing regions from 2008 to 2012:
- French Guiana: +17.8% (i.e. in 2012 the French Guianese economy produced 17.8% more goods and services than in 2007, after deflating inflation)
- Corsica: +10.9%
- City-State of Berlin: +9.4%
- Bavaria: +6.3%
- Paris Region (Île-de-France): +6.0%
- Lower Saxony: +5.7%
- City-State of Hamburg: +5.1%
- Brandenburg: +5.0%
- Schleswig-Holstein: +4.9%
- Rhineland-Palatinate: +4.5%


10 fastest declining regions from 2008 to 2012:
- Valencian Community: -8.6%
- Limousin : -8.6%
- Apulia: -9.3%
- Calabria: -9.8%
- Marche: -10.0%
- Umbria: -10.6%
- Basilicata: -10.8%
- Campania: -11.0%
- Sicily: -11.2%
- Molise: -14.3%


__________________
New Axa – New Brisavoine
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #12  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2014, 4:25 PM
New Brisavoine New Brisavoine is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,066
+ Benelux.

None of the Benelux regions make it in the top 10 or bottom 10. Noticeably, Wallonia has fared better than Flanders during this global crisis. The Netherlands have fared rather poorly. The North Netherlands region is in the green, but that's only because of the gas fields in Groningen (Friesland and Drenthe are in fact in light red).

__________________
New Axa – New Brisavoine
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #13  
Old Posted Mar 14, 2014, 5:16 PM
New Brisavoine New Brisavoine is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,066
Here are the GDP per capita of the European countries based on the latest PPP valuations (International Comparison Program 2011) and the latest population figures.

Three countries in particular have moved significantly up and down the ranking:
- Germany: moved up the ranking due to the 2011 census which showed that the German population was lower than previously estimated
- UK: moved down the ranking due to a- high inflation after 2008 which has reduced the PPP value of the sterling pound, and b- the 2011 census which showed that the population of the UK was higher than previously estimated
- Russia: moved up the ranking because the PPP value of the rubble has been revised up by ICP 2011

GDP per capita at PPP value in 2012:
- Norway: 64,321 US dollars
- Switzerland: 51,365
- Austria: 43,692
- Ireland: 43,231
- Netherlands: 43,020
- Germany: 42,573
- Denmark: 42,503
- Sweden: 42,267
- Belgium: 40,296
- Iceland: 39,890
- Finland: 39,119
- France: 36,777 (Metropolitan France: 37,184)
- UK: 35,134
- Italy: 34,299
- Spain: 31,210

- Malta: 29,258
- Slovenia: 27,492
- Czech Republic: 27,009
- Slovakia: 26,030
- Russia: 25,268
- Estonia: 24,809
- Portugal: 24,807
- Greece: 24,763
- Lithuania: 23,970
- Hungary: 22,986
- Poland: 22,744
- Latvia: 21,906
- Croatia: 19,742
- Romania: 18,193
- Bulgaria: 16,090
- Montenegro: 14,280
- Serbia: 12,507
- Macedonia: 11,918
- Bosnia: 9,375
- Albania: 9,146
__________________
New Axa – New Brisavoine
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #14  
Old Posted May 20, 2014, 6:38 PM
New Brisavoine New Brisavoine is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,066
Evolution of real GDP quarter by quarter, seasonally adjusted, from the start of the global crisis until Q1 2014.

Allemagne = Germany
Pays-Bas = Netherlands

__________________
New Axa – New Brisavoine
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #15  
Old Posted May 23, 2014, 1:05 PM
Lear's Avatar
Lear Lear is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Europa
Posts: 838
Swiss Economy Ranking:
The World's Most Competitive Countries - Forbes

1. U.S.A. (1)
2. Switzerland (2)
3. Singapore (4)
4. Hong Kong (3)
5. Sweden (4)
6. Germany (9)
7. Canada (7)
8. UAE (8)
9. Denmark (12)
10. Norway (6)
__________________
Berlin
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16  
Old Posted Jun 27, 2014, 6:03 PM
Lear's Avatar
Lear Lear is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Europa
Posts: 838
Germans reject their joyless image to become Europe's optimists
A survey shows more than half are satisfied with their lives and think positively about their employment prospects


Quote:
According to the report by the German Economic Institute in Cologne, more than half of all German citizens are extremely satisfied with their lives, and only 2% describe their level of contentment as low.

Researchers said that comparably high levels in Germany were recorded only twice previously: at the time of reunification in 1989-90 and during the new-economy boom at the turn of the century.
__________________
Berlin
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2014, 7:11 PM
New Brisavoine New Brisavoine is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,066
We now have the final estimates of the 2011 GDP per capita for the main metro areas of Germany, France, and the UK. The results of the 2011 censuses, which have now all been published, have greatly changed the GDP per capita of the German and British metro areas: the GDP per capita of the German metro areas were boosted due to a lower German population than was previously thought, whereas those of the British metro areas were cut down due to a higher population in the UK than was previously thought.

For France it is not possible to give the GDP per capita of the Lille metro area, because the Nord department is much larger than the Lille metro area. The figures for Bordeaux and Lyon in the list correspond precisely to the metro areas (I've included the parts of the Lyon metro area located outside of the Rhône department, and excluded the part of the Gironde department that is not within the Bordeaux metro area). For Nice, it's not possible to distinguish Nice from Monaco, due to the commuter flows between the Alpes-Maritimes department and the Principality of Monaco.

GDP per capita in 2011 (in US dollars, at market exchange rates, not at purchasing power parity):
- Munich metro area: 71,460
- Paris Region: 71,307
- Rhine-Main metro area (Frankfurt-Wiesbaden-Mainz): 60,332
- Stuttgart metro area: 57,832
- Hamburg metro area: 57,036

- Greater London + 6 home counties: 54,802
- Lyon metro area: 50,738
- Rhine-Ruhr metro area (Essen-Düsseldorf-Cologne): 47,914
- Edinburgh metro area: 47,913
- Nice-Monaco (Alpes-Maritimes + Principality of Monaco): 47,763 (figure heavily weighed down by the numerous retirees living in the area)
- Toulouse metro area: 46,729

GERMANY (entire country): 45,293
- Bristol metro area: 44,793
- Marseille metro area: 44,582
- Bordeaux metro area: 43,251
FRANCE (entire country): 42,812

- Berlin metro area: 39,046
UK (entire country): 38,964
- Glasgow metro area: 35,278
- West Yorkshire metro area (Leeds-Bradford): 34,463
- Manchester metro area: 34,255
- Newcastle metro area: 33,287
- Birmingham metro area: ca. 32,000
- Liverpool metro area: 29,783
- South Yorkshire metro area (Sheffield-Doncaster): 27,593
__________________
New Axa – New Brisavoine
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #18  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2014, 12:03 PM
New Brisavoine New Brisavoine is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,066
+ Italian and Spanish metro areas, based on the results of the 2011 censuses (this has boosted a little bit the GDP per capita of the Italian metro areas, since the census showed the population of Italy was lower than previously thought).

GDP per capita in 2011 (in US dollars, at market exchange rates, not at purchasing power parity):
- Munich metro area: 71,460
- Paris Region: 71,307
- Rhine-Main metro area (Frankfurt-Wiesbaden-Mainz): 60,332
- Stuttgart metro area: 57,832
- Hamburg metro area: 57,036

- Greater London + 6 home counties: 54,802
- Milan metro area: 52,105
- Lyon metro area: 50,738
- Rhine-Ruhr metro area (Essen-Düsseldorf-Cologne): 47,914
- Edinburgh metro area: 47,913
- Nice-Monaco (Alpes-Maritimes + Principality of Monaco): 47,763 (figure heavily weighed down by the numerous retirees living in the area)
- Toulouse metro area: 46,729

GERMANY (entire country): 45,293
- Rome metro area: 45,210
- Bristol metro area: 44,793
- Marseille metro area: 44,582
- Bordeaux metro area: 43,251
- Florence metro area: 42,922
FRANCE (entire country): 42,812

- Turin province: 42,192
- Madrid province: 40,940
- Berlin metro area: 39,046
- Bilbao province: 39,039
UK (entire country): 38,964
ITALY (entire country): 37,025
- Barcelona province: 35,861
- Glasgow metro area: 35,278
- West Yorkshire metro area (Leeds-Bradford): 34,463
- Manchester metro area: 34,255
- Newcastle metro area: 33,287
- Birmingham metro area: ca. 32,000
SPAIN (entire country): 31,173
- Liverpool metro area: 29,783
- Valencia province: 28,827
- South Yorkshire metro area (Sheffield-Doncaster): 27,593

- Palermo province: 25,549
- Naples metro area: 22,150
__________________
New Axa – New Brisavoine
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #19  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2014, 6:45 PM
mousquet's Avatar
mousquet mousquet is offline
that prick
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Nimbyland Paris, Museum France
Posts: 3,062
^ There was an atmosphere of some sort of slight recover in France in 2010/11. I think we'll be somewhat going down as for those figures as of 2012, won't we? Praise Mr Hollande and the wonderful French socialist family.
__________________
psst... A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. (John 13:34)
I like bass. Give me some.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #20  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2014, 7:55 PM
New Brisavoine New Brisavoine is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,066
Quote:
Originally Posted by mousquet View Post
I think we'll be somewhat going down as for those figures as of 2012, won't we?
No. GDP per capita doesn't change dramatically in just one or two years.
__________________
New Axa – New Brisavoine
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Europe
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 11:48 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.