HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > Buildings & Architecture

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #101  
Old Posted Sep 25, 2014, 3:07 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 44,122
“Cloud Citizen” Awarded Joint Top Honors in Shenzhen Bay Super City Competition

Read More: http://www.archdaily.com/549665/clou...y-competition/

Quote:
Cloud Citizen, a proposal for a new high-rise typology by Urban Future Organization and CR-Design, in collaboration with a team of experts at Chalmers Technical University, has been jointly awarded the highest prize in the Shenzhen Bay Super City Masterplan Competition. Their futuristic design features a singular mega building complex that aims to create a hyper dense urban center that gives back to the environment.

- The competition brief required a new 170-hectare financial district for the city, including three high-rise structures, cultural buildings, and a large green space to connect the district to the surrounding city. The hope for the masterplan is to create a new iconic financial district for Shenzhen, reminiscent of places such as La Défense in Paris or Canary Wharf in London. Cloud Citizen, however, proposes a radically different typology for this new urban center.

- The proposed 680 meter tall mega structure offers an alternative to the singular and unconnected high-rises found in most metropolitan areas. The plan also includes features to make the design more ecologically viable. Thus, Cloud Citizen functions as a “continuous metropolis” with public spaces suspended in the air and integrated into the structure itself. --- The enormous scale of the structure is broken down into smaller units to create a variety of spaces to serve public, commercial, and cultural programs. Each public space connects to a large park that acts as a green network for the city and aims to promote healthy and more sustainable lifestyles.

.....























__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #102  
Old Posted Oct 7, 2014, 2:12 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 44,122
What Would It Take to Turn New York into a Megacity?

Read More: http://io9.com/what-would-it-take-to...52944/+megneal

Quote:
Something bizarre happened overnight: New York City's population grew to the size of Shanghai's, swelling from 8 million people to 24 million. It's like a natural disaster, but this tidal surge is made of human needs. Here's how we'll rebuild the city to make room for them all.

- Though the rapid change is fantastical, the transformation isn't: New York's population is likely to grow by almost this much by the end of the century. All over the world, cities are making the transition from large cities to megacities of over 15 million people. So our thought experiment isn't about wanting to escape to the city planet Coruscant from Star Wars. It offers a glimpse of what the largest city in North America might actually look like in 2114.

- New York City is already one of the most densely-packed urban spaces in the world, with 10,724 people on average per square kilometer. To triple the living spaces here, we'll need to build up — but we'll also need to build between. The city could no longer afford to devote so much street space to the products of an already-shaky auto industry, and the city's grid would change immeasurably. So would the laws that govern it.

- For efficiency's sake, Manhattan would have to retain a couple of the major avenues like Fifth, which cuts through the center of the island. But it would be reserved for trucks delivering food — or taking garbage out. Other streets would be for licensed taxis and services like Uber, while cars belonging to individuals might be routed to the edges of island, or to other boroughs entirely. Getting around in Manhattan would mean taking public transit, or paying dearly to get an Uber.

- At the same time, there would be a flowering of pedestrian walkways like Sixth and a Half Avenue, which tunnels through the skyscrapers of midtown in between Sixth and Seventh Aves. As more skyscrapers grew, walkways would also take to the skies in bridges between buildings. To keep the ground-level streets less congested, pedestrians would be invited to walk Broadway from the air, hustling from building to building via a growing network of architectural tissues that would nourish a new sidewalk culture fifteen stories off the ground.

- Some of these elevated sidewalks would be classic New York, complete with tar-gummed concrete and jagged nubs of rusted rebar poking out at odd angles. But others would look like high-tech works of art. Architectural futurist Geoff Manaugh, proprietor of BLDG BLOG, describes megacity New York like this: --- A world of Judge Dredd-like megastructures, land bridges across rivers, and pedestrianized super-corridors extending through the labyrinthine hearts of financial complexes ... carving new routes through the deep interiors of buildings, without a car in sight.

- Columbia professor of urban development Kate Ascher (author of The Works) thinks the megacity of New York would have to spread into transit corridors, with construction booming (and prices skyrocketing) near train stations that can take commuters into the city center. Many of these new nodes would also be high-density areas with little area for automobiles and elevated sidewalks shuttling commuters through their vertical towers.

- Even if we can create our own version of Pearl River Delta's city clusters along the eastern seaboard, we may still be looking at an urban disaster. New York City produces about 37,000 tons of waste per day, all of which has to be trucked out of the city, often for hundreds of miles, before finding its final resting stop in landfill. Certainly the city might begin recycling more if the population boomed, but we'd still be looking at about three times the amount of waste — so, we can assume that our 24 million New Yorkers will be pumping out 111,000 tons of garbage every day. The problem wouldn't be the garbage piles, but the infrastructure needed to move them around.

- To find a new home for the landfill, the the city might rejuvenate a 1934 plan for expansion, which would have topped up the Hudson River with landfill. At the same time, the city might also explore radical new methods for garbage disposal, including converting it into an energy source or biochar for fertilizer. The edges of the city might be ringed with enormous biochar plants that heat up all the waste until it's converted into a coal-like substance whose byproducts include carbon neutral fuels.

- Most of New York's food arrives the same way garbage escapes: on trucks. There's been a lot of excitement about building vertical farms within Manhattan, or skyscraper greenhouses packed with enough crops to feed the whole city. But there is a lot of controversy over whether such structures would save money and energy. In the more populated future, we're probably looking at bringing in food on trucks powered by alterantive fuels rather than giant hydroponic farms towering over Union Square.

- With so many people depending on imported food, however, food security expert Evan Fraser worries that the new megacity would be even less prepared for disasters than it is now. Where would the city store emergency food supplies for 24 million New Yorkers if a natural disaster were to take down the power grid or blanket the midwest in ash? "New York City is dependent on a global supply chain for its food," Fraser said. "We have no data on what kinds of food stores exist because the government doesn't store food anymore. And food companies like Walmart or Monsanto won't tell us what they have stored. It's a proprietary secret."

- Unlike many cities that are struggling under the weight of population expansions, New York has one precious resource in abundance. Partly due to smart early planning, and partly due to luck of geography, the city has many sources of drinking water, including the Catskills and Croton watersheds north of the city. Clean water from these areas tumbles into the city through viaducts, propelled by nothing more than gravity.

.....



Shape-shifting elevated sidewalk concept, by sanzpont







__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #103  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2015, 6:36 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 44,122
PARIS SMART CITY 2050 - 8 PROTOTYPES OF POSITIVE ENERGY TOWERS ECO-CONCEIVED TO FIGHT GLOBAL WARMING

http://vincent.callebaut.org/page1-i...tcity2050.html



















































__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #104  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2015, 8:23 PM
munchymunch's Avatar
munchymunch munchymunch is offline
MPLSXCHI
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Omicron Persei 8
Posts: 1,037
Elevated Railway System Leading to Lady Liberty




Am I the only one who thought this was funny?
__________________
"I don't want to be interesting. I want to be good." -Ludwig Mies van der Rohe
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #105  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2015, 8:44 PM
HomeInMyShoes's Avatar
HomeInMyShoes HomeInMyShoes is offline
arf
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Pile 'O Bones
Posts: 11,272
^Totally. Lady Liberty eating trains is a great idea, but where does the train come out after getting eaten? It is unclear in the picture.

Those wire-mesh chicken coupe looking ones for Paris are absolutely atrocious. So dystopian.
__________________

-- “We heal each other with kindness, gentleness and respect.” -- Richard Wagamese
-- “Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, Nothing is going to get better. It's not.” -- Dr. Seuss

Last edited by HomeInMyShoes; Jan 19, 2015 at 8:44 PM. Reason: grammar
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #106  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2015, 1:55 AM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 44,122
In the 'Workplace of the Future,' We Hang Like Monkeys from Vertical Gardens

Read More: http://www.citylab.com/design/2015/0...orests/385009/

Quote:
What's worse than chatty coworkers interrupting your flow? How about a dude harvesting zucchini from a vertical garden falling and crashing through your desk in a hollering heap? OK, so that's looking on the dark side of Sean Cassidy and Joe Wilson's architectural dream, "Organic Grid+," the winner of Metropolis Magazine's recent competition to design the "Workplace of the Future."

Installing green walls probably would soothe office workers with computer-monitor fatigue. And it might be a nifty in-house method of providing healthy lunch to the workforce (as long as said workforce doesn't mind the occasional caterpillar on the keyboard). --- The visionary office, which Wilson and Cassidy have imagined for their hometown of London, would latch onto an existing building like a chlorophyll-filled leach, injecting it with light, hope, and vegetables. It would incorporate a host of supposedly freedom-granting features, such as walls that could be moved around at an employee's whim. (Or more likely, a boss's directive.)

The goal is to "change the negative associations of working in open-plan offices," write its creators: In addition to a flexible layout, the approach embraces "health-conscious plug-ins" (technology worn by the employees to monitor overall well-being and make healthy suggestions throughout the day) to aid in reducing sick days and increasing focus and productivity. --- In keeping with this mentality, sky gardens provide fresh food for employees to enjoy, as well as natural cooling and acoustic buffering throughout the building. The intrusion of green spaces into the structure itself also generates a more welcoming and overall pleasant atmosphere in which to work, ultimately boosting morale for those inside.

.....























__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #107  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2015, 7:02 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 44,122
http://www.theguardian.com/cities/20...rs-hoverboards


The 2010 Saturation City project imagined Melbourne in 40 years’ time, when sea levels have forced the city to concentrate into ‘superblocks’ rising above the water. Photograph: Bild Architecture/A Visual History of the Future







Competition entry Cloud Skippers imagines communities lifted above disaster-struck areas by helium balloon. Photograph: Studio Linfors/A Visual History of the Future







The Berg (2009) imagines a 1,000-metre manmade mountain on the site of Tempelhof airport in Berlin, Germany. Photograph: Mila & Jakob Tigges/A Visual History of the Future







Autopia Ampere (1978) was a concept by the late seascape architect Wolf Hilbertz. It uses Biorock – a mineral accretion technology which fast grows coral and repairs damaged reefs – developed by scientist Thomas Goreau. Photograph: Newton Fallis/A Visual History of the Future


__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #108  
Old Posted Feb 8, 2015, 10:24 PM
Trantor's Avatar
Trantor Trantor is offline
FUS RO DAH!
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: The Ecumenopolis
Posts: 15,513
Quote:
Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
I've always though Le Corbusier's plan for Algiers was pretty cool. A highway snaking along the coast with 14 residential levels beneath it. It clustered the population in the only location where cool breezes and water are accessible.


http://www.flickr.com/photos/glenhsparky/3540026813/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/glenhsparky/3540804708
There were similar plans to Rio
__________________
________________________________________
Easy, Tychus. This ain´t science fiction
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #109  
Old Posted Feb 14, 2015, 8:05 PM
Guiltyspark's Avatar
Guiltyspark Guiltyspark is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Metro Detroit
Posts: 924
People who design some of these "sutainable" cities seem to have no idea how many acres it takes to feed a population. Also, the vertical city concept seems to give you the same amount of space, just with a park around it. That is called a suburban apartment building and we have had those for awhile.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #110  
Old Posted Mar 14, 2015, 7:08 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 44,122
Please Let Tulsa Get This Tornado-Shaped Museum

Read More: http://www.citylab.com/design/2015/0...museum/387667/

Quote:
.....

The electrifying edifice is the work of Oklahoma's Kinslow, Keith & Todd, who designed it for a magazine story about reimagining downtown Tulsa. The architects would build it over an old parking garage and jam its floors with a weather museum, severe-storms laboratory, and leafy, outdoor terraces. There would be a revolving restaurant on top, fittingly, and animated lighting would give the impression the facade is slowly spinning.

- The firm's Jim Boulware told Tulsa People, "This would be Tulsa's Space Needle. No one else would have one." A critic might add "or want one," given the visceral terror the visage might elicit in disaster survivors. Yet it's important to note the current design is much softer than an earlier concept, which shows cows, cars, and a house sucked into the sky like the freakin' Wizard of Oz. --- Looking at this thing, I can't think to add anything to Facebook dude Johnie Moss' perfect comment: "Oh hell yes!!!" --- The building will likely never see the light of day, but it's a bold vision.

.....













__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #111  
Old Posted Mar 14, 2015, 8:41 PM
Guiltyspark's Avatar
Guiltyspark Guiltyspark is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Metro Detroit
Posts: 924
Oh God, that's awful.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #112  
Old Posted Mar 29, 2015, 12:30 PM
Guiltyspark's Avatar
Guiltyspark Guiltyspark is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Metro Detroit
Posts: 924
A lot of these designs also seem to forget that plants need space for root systems (sometimes as large as what you see above ground). And that roots are amazing at destroying concrete.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #113  
Old Posted Mar 31, 2015, 3:09 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 44,122
18 brilliant ideas for the skyscraper of the future

Read More:http://www.businessinsider.com/evolo...er-2015-3?op=1

Quote:
The winners of this year's eVolo Skyscraper Competition deal with some daunting themes, including overcrowding, global warming, and environmental disaster.

The contest, sponsored by eVolo Magazine and now in its 10th year, asks architects to envision the future of vertical living. Nearly 500 contestants submitted their ideas for the skyscrapers of tomorrow, and three winners and 20 honorable mentions were selected by a jury of leaders in the fields of architecture and design. These buildings may not be feasible today, but they attempt to answer some big questions about the future of urban spaces.

.....



The first-place winner was "Essence," a proposal to put a non-urban environment in a dense city center. The building would have 11 landscapes with fish tanks, jungle areas, and other environments.







In second place, "Shanty-Scraper" would be a mixed use residential and workspace for impoverished fishermen in the slums of Chennai, India. It would be built from recycled materials found within the city.







Third-place "Cybertopia" combines the digital and physical worlds in a building that can grow using 3D-printed technology and portable "ships."







The proposal for "Limestone Hills" would turn former limestone mines into exoskeletons for new construction.







"Tower of Refuge" is envisioned as a Noah's Ark that could provide sunlight, water, and air to a variety of species, and would act like a "self-operating machine serving all survival conditions."







"Air Monument" would function as a database to collect and store atmosphere samples in order to study and respond to climate change.







"Reversal Strategy" is a proposal to construct tall, thin buildings on top of the existing infrastructure so that old buildings can be demolished to make more public space.







"Vertical Factories in New York" would put 21 industrial towers along the Brooklyn coast in order to re-establish the city's manufacturing economy without compromising land.







"Noah Oasis" is a plan to turn existing oil rigs into "vertical bio-habitats" that could be used to help clean oil spills. In the longer term, it could host marine life and eventually shelter humanity from rising sea levels.







"Re-Generator Skyscraper" is a proposal to regenerate the wetlands of Hangshou, China. It would involve an elevated construction system to allow for the recovery of the city's wetlands.







"Deep Skins" is a proposal for a Midtown Manhattan skyscraper that offers a counterpoint to the ubiquitous glass highrise. Its exterior would mimic skin with interlocking pieces, creating a "billowing" interior.







"Times Squared 3015" is a vision for a mile-high skyscraper in the middle of New York City that's essentially a city-within-a-city. The plan calls for various "destination zones" like vertical farming, beach, mountain range, stadium, redwood forest, housing, and offices.







"Exploring Arctic" would completely transform the Arctic's remote Dikson City by creating a structure to revitalize and repopulate the port town that once existed there.







"Bio-Pyramid" is conceived as a biosphere and gateway from the Sahara Desert to Cairo, and an effort to reverse desertification as a result of climate change.







"Already There" turns traditional city planning on its head by considering three dimensions when conceiving new buildings. It "could be a good way of hyper-densifying cities even when they are extremely dense without affecting negatively the existing living conditions," says the architect.







"Vernacular Sky-Terrace" envisions a horizontal skyscraper that would allow for recreation much like a street, in order to foster a close-knit community.







"Unexpected Aura in Chernobyl" is both a monument to the 1986 nuclear disaster and a skyscraper with air and water purification systems to allow people to restart their lives in the area.







"Cloud Capture" would literally capture clouds and move them around the planet to alleviate effects of climate change.


__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #114  
Old Posted Apr 3, 2015, 6:07 PM
Guiltyspark's Avatar
Guiltyspark Guiltyspark is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Metro Detroit
Posts: 924
1. Kind of a cool concept, but also kind of unecessary in NYC. They already have a non-urban enviorment you may have heard of called Central Park. B
2. Seems safe... D
3. I don't think I understand this one, but it looks horrible. F
4. Beautiful. A
5. Something like this could not fuction for long enough to survive a mass extenction event, so it seems kind of pointless. C
6. We have weather balloons for that. D
7. "so that old buildings can be demolished to make more public space." Did we learn nothing from the past destruction of our architectural history? F
8. Lets not waste waterfront on industy, also, lets not put polluting industry right over our freaking water.
9. Ugh. C-
10. Now this is a great idea. A
11. Looks like a bunch of pointy noses, also, no view. C
12. A nice concept for a vertical neighborhood. The NIMBYs would love it. A
13. I actually really like the idea of replacing crappy small towns with single beautiful structures. there is already a town that is kind of like this in Alaska. The whole thing is in one apartment tower. A
14. Yay! Lets ruin a world heritige site! D
15. Jenga! B
16. I always wanted to live in Old New York from Futurama. How long until we forget what the suns warmth even felt like? C
17. I didn't realize that Russia was so lacking for space that they needed to build on the site of the largest nuclear disaster in history.
18. You just went full retard, never go full retard.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #115  
Old Posted Apr 13, 2015, 10:49 PM
chris08876's Avatar
chris08876 chris08876 is offline
Abiogenesis
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: New Jersey - Somerset County
Posts: 22,249
IN THE NETHERLANDS, A GIANT WIND TURBINE FOR PEOPLE TO LIVE ON







Quote:
Instead of tilting at windmills, how about living in one? The Dutch Windwheel is a giant proposed wind turbine for the city of Rotterdam in the Netherlands, which will feature apartments and hotel rooms along the outside of the structure.

Artist's images of the Windwheel at night look a little like a Stargate or the eye of Sauron, but the designer's vision for the circular skyscraper is more sustainable than storybook.

The central area of the building would be occupied by a power generator that harnesses the wind to produce electricity. Unlike other wind power systems, the system, EWICON, uses no moving parts, relying on the wind to push charged particles in particular directions to generate energy. Check out this video to get a more in-depth explanation.

[...]
==============================
http://www.popsci.com/netherlands-bu...ne-people-live
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #116  
Old Posted Apr 14, 2015, 9:45 PM
chris08876's Avatar
chris08876 chris08876 is offline
Abiogenesis
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: New Jersey - Somerset County
Posts: 22,249
BIG, MVRDV + snøhetta unveil proposals for oslo's government quarter









Quote:
A range of internationally acclaimed architects have unveiled six different proposals for a new government district in the norwegian capital of oslo. the design groups, which include snøhetta, MVRDV and BIG, were selected from 24 original entries and will determine potential solutions regarding urban policies and public engagement. the project will be developed alongside organizers statsbygg, the norwegian government’s key adviser in construction and property affairs.

The proposed tower from danish firm BIG proposes a topographic urban park to create a new setting for the site’s existing historic buildings. the scheme includes three towers, the tallest of which climbs to a total height of 105 meters.
=============================
http://www.designboom.com/architectu...dv-04-14-2015/
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #117  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2015, 3:53 PM
chris08876's Avatar
chris08876 chris08876 is offline
Abiogenesis
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: New Jersey - Somerset County
Posts: 22,249
Ennead Architects designs a celestial museum experience in China.



Quote:
Ennead Architects won a bid to design the new Shanghai Planetarium, a branch of the Shanghai Science and Technology Museum. With a building comprising three components, or “celestial bodies”—the Oculus, the Sphere, and the Inverted Dome —the architecture is modeled after orbital motion, with each component designed to be a distinct astronomical instrument.

The Oculus is the linchpin of the Planetarium and is suspended from the cantilevered form of the museum’s galleries above. A sundial allows visitors to witness the physical passage of time via the movement of a circle of sunlight on the ground across the entry plaza and reflecting pool. “The Chinese are very tuned in to the movement of the sun and we still go by a lunar calendar. This idea of orbiting is embedded into the form,” explained Ennead Design Partner Thomas Wong.

Meanwhile, the Sphere contains the Theater and is a reference point for museumgoers. Finally, the Inverted Dome features an uninterrupted sky dome from which to view galactic goings-on through 79-foot-high solar telescopes.

Celebrating both the history of Chinese astronomy and the future of space exploration, the Planetarium is slated to transform the district. “China has a very ambitious space exploration program. And I think part of the mission of this museum is to really educate and get kids especially excited about exploring space,” said Wong.
===========================
http://archpaper.com/news/articles.a...6#.VS_avvnF9mC
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #118  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2015, 9:12 PM
drumz0rz drumz0rz is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 623
Quote:
Originally Posted by munchymunch View Post
Elevated Railway System Leading to Lady Liberty




Am I the only one who thought this was funny?
This one looks like a political cartoon mocking the elevated railroads. It's a commentary on how the trains are marring the beauty of NY and choking everyone with their presence.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #119  
Old Posted Apr 19, 2015, 10:30 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 44,122
Everyone Has a Great View in a Spinning Apartment Building

Read More: http://www.citylab.com/housing/2015/...ilding/390768/

Quote:
The biggest class conflict for coming generations will not be access to good education or medical care. It will be who has the best view. Or that's what industrial designer Shin Kuo is kind of implying, writing:

According to my research, urbanization has become a big trend in the world. Because of that, buildings will become higher and higher, and more and more people who live in the lower floors of buildings will get their view blocked. Based on the results from both the Asian and the American market research, there is a [difference] in sales or rental prices between the lower floor units and higher floor units in the same building. In the future, all the top floors of buildings will be owned by people with very high incomes and the middle to lower income people will only have a limited view from their living spaces.

.....



















__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #120  
Old Posted Apr 29, 2015, 8:30 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 44,122
One 'Solution' to Urban Air Pollution: Let's Live in Bubbles

Read More: http://www.citylab.com/design/2015/0...ubbles/391625/

Website: http://orproject.com/bubbles/

Quote:
You know China and India have environmental image problems when people give up on fixing their dismal air quality and instead suggest living like the Bubble Boy in hermetic, climate-controlled complexes. That's the innovative and somewhat troublesome vision of international architecture firm Orproject, which proposes dotting cities in the developing world with green spaces containing filtered air.

- The geometry of the light-weight structural system has been generated using an algorithm which simulates the development of veins in leaves or butterfly wings. The heating and cooling of the air is done through a ground source heat exchange system. Electricity for the project can be generated by solar cells integrated into the canopy surface. --- Botanical Gardens have been built in many world cities. They are attractions for tourists and recreational facilities for the inhabitants of the city. Both children and adults can experience nature and learn about the plants of the park. Inside the green houses, the temperature and humidity are controlled throughout the year, which allows the growth of plants from any climate. The plants and landscapes from all over the world can be placed inside the Bubbles project.

.....













__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > Buildings & Architecture
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 9:28 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.