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  #81  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2018, 12:10 AM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
It also doesn't have a "real summer" by most people's definition.

In my experience people will endure a lot in terms of winter weather provided there is a decent summer as a "reward" every year.
That's true, I think it's just personal preference to some extent.

I like overcast conditions and precipitation and temperatures that don't fluctuate wildly. I prefer Vancouver to Toronto for example as far as climate. I would prefer to live in Prince Rupert than, say, Brandon, MB (setting aside differences in size and connectedness -- both of which Prince Rupert lags in). Although there is definitely something to be said about having four distinct seasons.
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  #82  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2018, 12:11 AM
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Originally Posted by GlassCity View Post
Since we're on the topic, I made this map a while ago of all the CMAs and CAs in Canada. I think it's just interesting to see the distribution of population. While it doesn't show differences in population (Toronto and Swift Current have the same size dot) I still think it's interesting to see what's "settled" and what isn't quite.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Vg...OY&usp=sharing

Awesome.

There's another map I want to share that I think is useful in this discussion.



The green, yellow, orange and red areas look ripe for potential settlement and growth.
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  #83  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2018, 12:18 AM
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Originally Posted by saffronleaf View Post
No offense to Winnipeg, but I look at Winnipeg, a healthy, growing metropolitan area that isn't driven by idiosyncratic economic realities like natural resources, as the coldest healthy major Canadian city. If temperatures are warmer than or roughly similar to Winnipeg, I think the city can be viable (although of course there are many other factors).

By that measure, I think Northern Ontario, the Peace Region, Prince George and south thereof in Central Interior BC, North Coast of BC (Prince Rupert), and Whitehorse are all pretty great for natural northern settlement.
Going along with my theory - Winnipeg has a real summer.
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  #84  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2018, 12:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Going along with my theory - Winnipeg has a real summer.
True, but there are still places in that list of regions that have a real summer and winters that are only as cold as Winnipeg or warmer.

Regardless, it's not entirely clear that places with limited temperature variation and no real summer are unsuitable for substantial settlement, as evidenced by some areas in the rest of the world.
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  #85  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2018, 12:45 AM
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Prince Rupert tends to be in a bad spot where it gets all the negatives of the Marine climate with few positives. It is somewhere between northern Scotland and the south coast of Iceland in climate... not that great.

Honestly I would take Haida Gwaii over Prince Rupert (also no real summer, but much less snow and milder in the winter) or more inland north coastal locations such as Terrace (snowy winters, but not brutally cold in comparison to much of Canada and still has a real summer).
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  #86  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2018, 12:54 AM
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If it's warmer summers you're after, spots in interior BC like the Okanagan valley, such as where Kelowna is are pretty good.

Overall, given the climate, cities like Kamloops and Kelowna could be bigger.

Even looking at the interior rather than the coast, though you trade off the mild winters, some people might prefer the warmer summers (highs that reach the mid to high 20s, lows in the 10s).
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  #87  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2018, 1:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Capsicum View Post
If it's warmer summers you're after, spots in interior BC like the Okanagan valley, such as where Kelowna is are pretty good.

Overall, given the climate, cities like Kamloops and Kelowna could be bigger.

Even looking at the interior rather than the coast, though you trade off the mild winters, some people might prefer the warmer summers (highs that reach the mid to high 20s, lows in the 10s).
For sure. There are settled areas with suitable climate like southern Interior BC, southwestern Ontario, and the Maritimes that are pretty underpopulated relatively speaking.
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  #88  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2018, 1:06 AM
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There exist a few cities in the Old World roughly as cold as Winnipeg or even colder that are quite big.

Novosibirsk, in Russian Siberia (and the third largest Russian city) is roughly as cold as Winnipeg, and is over one and a half million in population.

Astana, Kazakhstan, just a big milder than Winnipeg is also over a million, as is Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, which is colder.

Harbin, in northern China, also colder than Winnipeg is a city of five million (though in a country as densely populated as China, you'd expect even the coldest parts of the country to have lots of people, by world standards).
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  #89  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2018, 1:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Capsicum View Post
If it's warmer summers you're after, spots in interior BC like the Okanagan valley, such as where Kelowna is are pretty good.

Overall, given the climate, cities like Kamloops and Kelowna could be bigger.

Even looking at the interior rather than the coast, though you trade off the mild winters, some people might prefer the warmer summers (highs that reach the mid to high 20s, lows in the 10s).
The BC Interior (Central Okanagan) is growing at a decent clip. As long as prices remain reasonable, we could see a metropolitan area form in and around the Vernon-Kelowna-Penticton corridor. All are close to one another (Vernon to Penticton being the longest distance from each other at about an hour and a half), and the population, if you include all the smaller town like Summerland, Peachland, Enderby etc., is probably closing in on 350,000 - 400,000 people.
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  #90  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2018, 1:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Metro-One View Post
Prince Rupert tends to be in a bad spot where it gets all the negatives of the Marine climate with few positives. It is somewhere between northern Scotland and the south coast of Iceland in climate... not that great.
But still nowhere near as populated as, say, Reykjavik or even Juneau.
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  #91  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2018, 1:09 AM
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Originally Posted by giallo View Post
The BC Interior (Central Okanagan) is growing at a decent clip. As long as prices remain reasonable, we could see a metropolitan area form in and around Vernon-Kelowna-Penticton. All are close to one another (Vernon to Penticton being the longest distance from each other at about an hour and a half), and the population, if you include all the smaller town like Summerland, Peachland, Enderby etc., is probably closing in on 350,000 - 400,000 people.
Is the Interior getting population growth from people moving out of the Vancouver area, or other parts of BC due to expense? Or from other parts of Canada inter-provincially, or international immigration?
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  #92  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2018, 1:11 AM
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Canada's north is also looking towards immigration to boost its growth.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/...inee-1.4188206
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  #93  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2018, 1:19 AM
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Russia is a cold country, and the country with the most land area (Canada is second), so it shows what population densities are still possible even with a similar climate.

Even though Canada and Russia both are towards the bottom of the list of the countries in the world by population density, Canada's population density (about 4 people per square km) is still about half of Russia's (about 8 or 9). Obviously, the Old World country and New World country comparison has some differences, but it's still a demonstration that Canada can get much denser and still not be that crowded globally speaking.
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  #94  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2018, 1:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Capsicum View Post
Is the Interior getting population growth from people moving out of the Vancouver area, or other parts of BC due to expense? Or from other parts of Canada inter-provincially, or international immigration?
Not sure of that actual stats, but yeah, a lot of families from Vancouver have relocated to the Okanagan in last few years. Some are returning home, while others are moving there for the first time.

In my extended group of friends, I've lost count as to how many have returned after having their second child. Metro Vancouver is rough if you want to raise a family in a SFH, and not spend 2 1/2 to 3 hours a day in traffic.
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  #95  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2018, 2:35 AM
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I often say on here that most people don't care as much about climate as SSP forumers think.

There are limits to this though. Most people seem pretty ok with a range of 0F to 100F within a given year. Not sure if there is anything to this regarding how Fahrenheit developed his scale.
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  #96  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2018, 2:41 AM
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Another thing is that the world's biggest cities have variable coldness in winter, but you have to get pretty far down the list to find a city that does not average over 20C for a max in mid-summer.
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  #97  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2018, 2:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I often say on here that most people don't care as much about climate as SSP forumers think.
It boggles my mind how many good threads are derailed by climate measuring and comparing.
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  #98  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2018, 3:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I often say on here that most people don't care as much about climate as SSP forumers think.

There are limits to this though. Most people seem pretty ok with a range of 0F to 100F within a given year. Not sure if there is anything to this regarding how Fahrenheit developed his scale.
some SSP forumers aren't just all about climate but are fanatical about temperature in particular. They rarely mention precipitation but will tend to declare that the sky is falling all the time even though their city is about average temperature during that week/month/season.

Also some SSP forumers can be living in the snowest, windest, foggest, cloudest, rainest, what-have-you place in Canada but declare that there locale is one of the 'mildest' places in Canada.

That's food for thought, fahrenheit scale may very well have been based on a scale from 1 to a 100 considering a human comfort factor.
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  #99  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2018, 3:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I often say on here that most people don't care as much about climate as SSP forumers think.

There are limits to this though. Most people seem pretty ok with a range of 0F to 100F within a given year. Not sure if there is anything to this regarding how Fahrenheit developed his scale.
Well, I think climate preferences come into play after all the other factors are no longer an issue for living (job prospects, cost of living, cultural amenities etc.). Otherwise, those would come first for many people (it wouldn't be uncommon that someone would move to a city with a bitterly cold climate if it has great job prospects over a pleasant climate where they couldn't make a living).

But if those things aren't issues and people have a variety of choices for cities to live in, the people who can afford to choose between places for climate reasons can be quite vocal about their preferences.
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  #100  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2018, 3:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I often say on here that most people don't care as much about climate as SSP forumers think.

There are limits to this though. Most people seem pretty ok with a range of 0F to 100F within a given year. Not sure if there is anything to this regarding how Fahrenheit developed his scale.
I agree with that as a general matter. People are not going to decide between Chicago and Montreal and Moscow based on close analysis of the temperatures. They're all cities with warm summers, cold winters, and four distinct seasons.

But I do think climate plays a role at the fringes.

I think Thunder Bay, Sudbury, Grand Prairie and Prince George are within the general realm of temperatures that seem suitable for settlement, whereas Yellowknife and Iqaluit seem beyond that.

edit - also Whitehorse and Prince Rupert although I acknowledge the latter is contested.

Last edited by saffronleaf; Feb 19, 2018 at 3:44 AM.
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