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Old Posted Jul 31, 2017, 6:13 PM
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Smile NEW YORK | Anable Basin (5-40 44th Road ) | 650 FT & 500 FT| FLOORS

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/28/r...ownstairs.html

Queens High-Rises to Have Industrial Space Downstairs


By C. J. HUGHES
JULY 28, 2017


Quote:
A developer is proposing a project in Long Island City, Queens, that will offer something that has long been a no-no in New York: factories and apartments on the same site.

TF Cornerstone is planning a massive $925 million mixed-use development on the waterfront with 1,000 rental apartments and 100,000 square feet of light manufacturing space.

On June 27, after a selection process that stretched more than a year, New York officials chose a team led by TF Cornerstone to undertake the two-building complex, to rise on more than four acres of city-owned land that now has parking lots, a road-repair facility and a shuttered restaurant that played a role in a federal investigation.

The 1.5-million-square-foot project, which will also add offices, stores, a public school and a park to an East River area called Anable Basin, still requires a zoning-change approval, a public process that could take two years.

“This has something for everyone,” said Jeremy Shell, a principal of TF Cornerstone, which has three development partners: BJH Advisors, a real estate finance firm, and two nonprofits, the Greenpoint Manufacturing and Design Center, an industrial landlord, and the Coalition for Queens, a developer focused on technology companies.

“The types of commercial uses will be complementary,” Mr. Shell added. “They won’t create issues. They will create a very dynamic neighborhood.”

The tower portions of the complexes will be tall. One is planned to be 650 feet, or about 65 stories, and the other will clock in at 500 feet, or 50 stories. They will mirror the cluster of seven glassy high-rises that stand along a nearby stretch of riverbank, by a well-known Pepsi-Cola sign. TF Cornerstone owns five of those buildings, the two tallest of which are 400 feet.

But the new towers, which will taper as they rise, are intended to be more graceful than what’s popped up along much of the river in the past decade, said Alicia Glen, New York’s deputy mayor for housing and economic development.

For years, housing and factories were kept far apart, which was especially important when the factories were polluters. But as industries have cleaned up their acts, that kind of restrictive zoning no longer makes as much sense, she said.

Also, if successful, the Anable Basin project could disprove the notion that luxury housing hurts industrial neighborhoods because it eats up land that could be used for factories, Ms. Glen added.

“All of the battles over rezoning pitted jobs versus housing, which is something we need to get beyond,” she said. “I hope this can change the conversation in a more positive way.”

Ms. Glen added that of the nine development proposals received in May 2016 by the city’s Economic Development corporation, which handled the selection process, TF Cornerstone’s stood out for having so many nonresidential uses.

While details about layouts and amenities are still being hashed out for a project that’s not expected to open until 2022, the apartments will be studios to three-bedrooms. Twenty-five percent of the units will be below market rate.

Currently, market-rate one-bedrooms in Long Island City rent for an average of $2,814 a month, according to a June market report from the brokerage MNS.

As for industrial tenants, they will pay about $3,700 to $9,000 a month, said Brian T. Coleman, the chief executive of the Greenpoint Manufacturing and Design Center, which will own and manage 50,000 square feet of the manufacturing space. The rent is below average for the area, in keeping with Greenpoint’s mission, Mr. Coleman added.

Also at Anable Basin will be 400,000 square feet of offices, 19,000 square feet of stores, an 80,000-square-foot elementary school and a one-acre waterside park with an esplanade that wraps around and connects to an existing public pier.

The shuttered restaurant, the Water’s Edge, is enmeshed in a federal investigation into whether Mayor Bill de Blasio helped Harendra Singh, its operator, in his quest to obtain favorable lease terms in exchange for campaign contributions.

The two-story barge-supported restaurant, whose lease expired in May, will be razed and replaced with a similar business under TF Cornerstone’s proposal. “The details of that are not fully resolved yet,” Mr. Shell said, “but our intent is to reintroduce a waterfront restaurant, generally in that location.”

Recouping investments for projects with so much commercial space can be challenging, since industrial rents are usually far cheaper than residential ones, “and over time, the differential just grows and grows and grows,” said Adam Friedman, the executive director of the Pratt Center for Community Development, a Brooklyn-based research group.

This can pressure landlords to convert industrial space to higher-paying uses, Mr. Friedman added. But since the developers will lease the land from the city and not buy it outright — a lower-cost proposition — the deal may pencil out more favorably, he said. That the project will receive abated property taxes and other tax exemptions will also help, he said.

Mr. Friedman said he liked the idea of a return to the old days, when craftsmen often lived where they worked. “This is the way cities were always built,” he said.
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Old Posted Jul 31, 2017, 6:14 PM
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Rendering by TF Cornerstone

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Old Posted Jul 31, 2017, 6:19 PM
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https://www.nycedc.com/press-release...ial-commercial

New York Works: NYCEDC Announces Plan to Bring First of its Kind Industrial-Commercial-Residential Project to Long Island City Waterfront

July 31, 2017


Quote:
New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC) today announced a plan to transform two City-owned sites on the Long Island City waterfront into a groundbreaking mixed-use project that combines industrial and commercial office with residential space in order to support 21st century jobs and innovation. Development of the 1.5 million square foot project is expected to create approximately 1,500 permanent and more than 2,500 construction jobs.

The project will also include more than 250 units of affordable housing, a new 600-seat school, workforce training programs, 25,000 square feet of art space, more than an acre of open space, and ground floor retail. This development also delivers on key goals of New York Works, Mayor de Blasio’s plan to create 100,000 quality jobs over the next ten years, by catalyzing job growth in both the innovation and industrial sectors, and providing good paying jobs that are accessible to New Yorkers from all backgrounds.

“Long Island City has emerged as one of the fastest growing centers of our city’s economy, especially when it comes to innovation and modern industrial jobs,” said NYCEDC President and CEO James Patchett. “With this project we are creating a first of its kind work-live-play structure, with affordable housing, incubators, and space for cultural institutions. We're investing in the continued revitalization of the Long Island City Waterfront, and delivering on our commitment to create good, middle class jobs for New Yorkers.”

“This dynamic new development on the Queens waterfront will bring new diverse assets to this community,” said Department of Housing Preservation and Development Commissioner Maria Torres-Springer. “The project will include critically needed affordable housing for an area that will undergo a major transformation. We are excited to work with our colleagues at EDC and development partners to see this project through to fruition.”

"We are thrilled to have the opportunity to bring another state-of-the-art school to Long Island City, said New York City School Construction Authority President and CEO Lorraine Grillo. This school, which will provide our students with a world class learning environment, builds on the tremendous work being done to not only address overcrowding in District 30 but to plan ahead and support our growing communities.”

“New schools are an incredible investment in our communities, and this state-of-the art facility will provide hundreds of new seats for families in the area while helping to alleviate overcrowding,” said Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña.

NYCEDC selected a joint submission by TF Cornerstone (TFC), Greenpoint Manufacturing and Design Center (GMDC), C4Q, and BJH Advisors to build on this unique waterfront site. The project will provide:

-100,000 square feet of light industrial space, including 50,000 square feet of affordable workspace co-developed by GMDC

-400,000 SF of commercial space, including:

-22,500 square feet of pre-built incubator spaces

-10,000 square feet for an Arts and Technology Accelerator, providing education, training, incubation and economic opportunities

-10,000 square feet of classroom space for workforce development and career training

-80,000 square feet of step-out office space for start-ups and fast-growing companies in the tech, arts, design and creative industries

-At least 1,000 residential units, with 25% affordable housing

-A brand new approximately 600 seat school

-Over an acre of open space, including a canoe and kayak launch point, to be designed in consultation with community members

-19,000 square feet of ground-floor retail




Quote:
“Over the last decade, TF Cornerstone has been a leader in Long Island City’s urban renaissance, evolving from a largely industrial hub to a thriving 24/7 community,” said Jeremy Shell, Principal and Executive Vice President at TFC. “As an early pioneer in developing over 3,200 apartments along the Long Island City waterfront, TF Cornerstone is thrilled to be part of the next chapter in the evolution of this neighborhood. We are excited to be working with the DeBlasio Administration and our development partners GMDC, C4Q and BJH, on creating a new model for urban mixed-use development.”

“C4Q is focused on building inclusion and equality through technology and ensuring that more New Yorkers are able to participate in the new innovation economy,” said Jukay Hsu, CEO and founder of C4Q. “This initiative is a transformative opportunity to create a diverse, integrated, and dynamic physical environment with vibrant live and work spaces that are representative of the values and cultures of Queens and New York City. We are excited to work with the NYCEDC and TF Cornerstone to connect our local community with the tremendous opportunities created by the rapidly growing tech industry.”

“GMDC is grateful to have been considered a potential partner and is now very excited about participating in the project now that our team has been selected. We look forward to working with TF Cornerstone to develop the industrial space and to be a part of this transformative development,” said Brian T. Coleman, CEO of GMDC.

In February 2016, NYCEDC issued a request for proposals (RFP) for the development of these sites. The two sites, located near major residential developments at Hunter’s Point South and Queens West, are currently being used as a Department of Education (DOE) parking lot and a Department of Transportation (DOT) facility, both of which will be relocated as part of this development.

This project will deliver 500,000 square feet of space for jobs of the future - a key component of New York Works, Mayor de Blasio’s plan to create 100,000 quality jobs over the next ten years. In particular, the selection of a development team for the LIC Waterfront project fulfils one of fifteen short-term milestones in New York Works.

Additionally, by providing hundreds of thousands of square feet of new office and light manufacturing space, the development will help address the need for additional workspace in New York City. NYCEDC projects that 60 million square feet of new commercial office space will be needed across the city by 2025, much of it in outer borough commercial hubs like Long Island City.



http://qns.com/story/2017/07/31/mass...es-new-school/

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Old Posted Jul 31, 2017, 9:19 PM
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Hunters Point is my favorite part of Long Island City and it's about to get bigger and better.
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Old Posted Aug 1, 2017, 1:25 AM
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Originally Posted by tdawg View Post
Hunters Point is my favorite part of Long Island City and it's about to get bigger and better.
All of these people have got to go somewhere, and where you can build up, build up. It's the way to go.
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“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
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Old Posted Aug 1, 2017, 11:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tdawg View Post
Hunters Point is my favorite part of Long Island City and it's about to get bigger and better.
Its really a small city in itself. I remember what LIC was like 5 years ago and I'd imagine anybody who hasn't been in that area for like 7-10 years, if they come back today, it's like holy shit what happened. New stores, towers, manufacturing warehouses now skyscrapers, a lot more people on the street... it's a beautiful sight. The same scenario in DoBro. 10 years ago vs now.

I imagine the same for non-residents. Lets say someone in Europe or Asia who hasn't been to the city in over 10 years. If they come back today, it's a new city in many ways. From certain neighborhoods to new parks and so on. The Bloomberg and De Blasio era witnessed profound change.
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Old Posted Aug 2, 2017, 5:25 PM
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Not just Europe or Asia. I had a meeting with a freelance client from Manhattan and I took her to Hunters Point (we went to Sweetleaf) and she was amazed at how pretty and lively the area was and ... she had never heard of Hunters Point, even though her office in the Chrysler Building looks directly across the river at the Pepsi sign. The lack of knowledge about Queens (besides the airports and stadiums) from Manhattanites is pretty surprising sometimes.
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Old Posted Aug 2, 2017, 11:34 PM
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I agree. Queens I feel is severely underrated. I now travel to the borough a lot for work, in fact, going back tomorrow, and the more I'm in the area, the more I like it. In fact, its my second favorite borough after Manhattan. This was not the case a year ago, but the travel has really opened my eyes to Queens beauty, urbanism, and diverse nature. It has a certain charm to it.
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Old Posted Aug 17, 2017, 3:02 PM
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https://therealdeal.com/2017/08/17/a...irresponsible/

Advocates call TF Cornerstone’s $925M LIC megaproject “irresponsible”
Critics argue the project site is too flood-prone






August 17, 2017


Quote:
A Long Island City advocacy group is fighting TF Cornerstone’s planned mixed-use waterfront development, arguing that the project is “irresponsible” because it’s planned in a hurricane evacuation zone.

The group, the LIC Coalition, launched a petition last week to oppose the project at 5-40 44th Road and 4-99 44th Road, which is expected to include 1,000 apartments and 100,000 square feet of space for light manufacturing, DNAinfo reported. The coalition wants the two city-owned parcels to be converted into public parkland instead.

“We think continuing to build in a flood plain is irresponsible,” said Diane Hendry, a member of the LIC Coalition. “The land is a natural wetlands. It should be preserved. We do not want this land used for 1,000 luxury units.”

The project is planned for an area the city has designated as most likely to flood during a storm, Hurricane Evacuation Zone 1. The sites are also located on the border of two FEMA flood zones with the highest risk of flooding. The city’s Economic Development Corporation told DNAinfo that the project is in early design phase and will comply “with all applicable resiliency standards.”

The $925 million development would also include a 600-seat public elementary school and a one-acre park. At least 25 percent of units are designated affordable.

These NIMBYs, and their tactics....
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“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
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Old Posted Aug 17, 2017, 11:06 PM
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These local community groups need to loose the ability to block new development, plain and simple.
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Old Posted Aug 17, 2017, 11:08 PM
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Plus it includes a school and an affordable component. Sometimes developers bend over backwards, but its never good enough. 1000 units, 250 affordable.

I wonder if as a hypothetical, they increased it to 50% affordable. Would they be for it? Probably not.

Quote:
A Long Island City advocacy group is fighting TF Cornerstone’s planned mixed-use waterfront development, arguing that the project is “irresponsible” because it’s planned in a hurricane evacuation zone.
This is rubbish. Shit, all of South Florida should not be developed if thats the case. By that logic, many portions of the city are irresponsible for building new developments.


Credit: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/0...n_3460565.html
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Old Posted Aug 17, 2017, 11:19 PM
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At this point, I think advocates are just trying to find any way to delay construction just to keep the noise down.
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Old Posted Aug 18, 2017, 5:20 PM
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They're just NIMBYs doing their typical NIMBY arguments. It's too tall, it's too big, too crowded, too noisy, too expensive, not affordable, strains infrastructure, too out of context, blocks sunlight, casts shadows, gentrification, school overcrowding, roads too congested, not enough parking, trains/bus too crowded, no air and now flooding.

Anything else we haven't heard of before?
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Old Posted Nov 14, 2017, 8:56 PM
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Forget about the headline, it wouldn't be Queens tallest, but the area is heating up for Anable Basin II



https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/14/n...ty-queens.html

A Record-Breaking Tower Is Proposed for Queens




By C. J. HUGHES
NOV. 14, 2017


Quote:
Among the city’s waterways, Anable Basin is not particularly grand or historic. It is a 500-foot artificial inlet cut into an industrial section along the East River, in Long Island City, Queens.

But as much of New York’s once-industrial waterfront has been transformed into pricey residential housing, the family that owns most of the land along the basin sees it as rich in possibilities for development, and it is proposing to replace its ho-hum warehouses with a $3-billion project, including an apartment tower that would rise about 700 feet, or 70 stories, making it taller than any existing building not only in Queens, but in all of the boroughs outside Manhattan.

“I think people will come out and say that’s too much,” said Diane Hendry, a spokeswoman for the LIC Coalition, a nonprofit that formed last year to fight overdevelopment in the neighborhood. Ms. Hendry, 58, a 29-year resident of the area and an artist, calls the family members from Plaxall Realty, the company behind the plan, “fabulous.”

“But that doesn’t mean they should have the biggest, grandest development,” she added.

The plan would require a massive rezoning of the area to allow for apartments and taller buildings. On Tuesday, it is poised to take its first step closer to reality when the Department of City Planning is expected to release the first public details of the project, while also announcing the first hearing for public comment, in December.

Plaxall was founded in 1938 by an engineer named Louis Pfohl after he relocated from the Midwest in order to design elevator cabs.

Three of Mr. Pfohl’s grandchildren — the cousins Paula Kirby, 51, a former fashion executive; Matthew Quigley, 52, a lawyer; and Tony Pfohl, 41, a lawyer who spends some of his time in Dubuque, Iowa, managing properties in the city where Mr. Pfohl grew up — acknowledge that the project’s tallest tower, which would surpass the Citigroup Building, Queens’ most recognizable skyscraper, will be controversial.

But they say the city’s Mandatory Inclusionary Housing program, which requires developers to create a certain percentage of affordable housing, mandates that a quarter of the 5,000 proposed condominiums and rental units be offered at below-market prices. If they can’t fetch top dollar for a large batch of apartments, they say, they have to make up the money with luxury apartments on upper floors with sweeping city views.

The tower and other planned buildings would be “a unique opportunity to really make a skyline for Long Island City,” Ms. Kirby said.

The development would also include 3.1 acres of public space, banked to protect against flooding, as well as barges with cafes and kayak docks.

The rezoning process for the mixed-use project, which would also add commercial spaces for light manufacturing, shops and day care providers, plus a public school on a different site, could eat up most of 2018, said Jonathan Drescher, a former executive with the Durst Organization, whom Plaxall hired to manage the process.

At the site, near Vernon Boulevard, Plaxall currently controls 13 acres, or about five city blocks, where all the buildings would be razed. The other two acres are owned by a handful of landlords, who are expected to either redevelop their land or sell their property once the rezoning is complete.

Plaxall has proposed 4,995 apartments, as well as 335,000 square feet of manufacturing space, which could be leased to tenants like furniture fabricators, breweries or bakeries.

Tenants, including people who work at those businesses, would live upstairs, according to the plan.

The project is similar to the two-towered complex planned around the corner on city-owned land on 44th Drive that will have 1,000 apartments and 100,000 square feet of light manufacturing space, from a team led by the firm TF Cornerstone; one of its towers would clock in at 650 feet.

But eliminating industrial activities, in a city where manufacturing zones are shrinking quickly, has not always gone over well.

Before construction begins on the first phase of the Anable Basin project, which would likely have 500 apartments, Plaxall is hoping to sell a stake to a developer, though company officials said it is too soon to name potential partners. Plaxall would also consider selling its entire five-block site.

But, said Mr. Pfohl, whose firm owns other buildings nearby, “it is certainly not in our best interests to cash out with the first offer we get.”

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