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  #8961  
Old Posted Jul 10, 2018, 11:18 PM
milomilo milomilo is offline
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Originally Posted by libtard View Post
There is no study proving a link between the Koocanusa reservoir and increased rates of gastrointestinal diseases to nearby residents. Go ahead, try and find one. The only honest answer is there just isn’t enough data
That's correct. Nice try at a diversion, but you haven't furthered your position. Go find that study.

However there is at least more evidence (as in more than nothing) for a potential link at Kookenusa - Teck have reported selenium levels are higher than guidelines as have the other measurements. No such data exists for toxins in the Athabasca (to my knowledge, I'm hoping you can find that for me). But that wouldn't prove a link in either case anyway, correlation is not causation.
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  #8962  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2018, 3:19 PM
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There are actual studies proving residents of nearby fort chipewayan have higher cancer rates due to the Athabasca River. No such study exists for the residents near the reservoir in the US. But when one does exist we’ll address it in true Alberta like fashion ie. deny it
Ft Chip is on Lake Athabasca. at the other end of the lake is Uranium City, an open pit uranium mine. also probably one of the countries largest hazardous waste sites. There is uranium particulate blowing in the dust and is in the water system. No one ever mentions this when bringing up Ft Chips higher levels of cancer.
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  #8963  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2018, 8:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Airboy View Post
Ft Chip is on Lake Athabasca. at the other end of the lake is Uranium City, an open pit uranium mine. also probably one of the countries largest hazardous waste sites. There is uranium particulate blowing in the dust and is in the water system. No one ever mentions this when bringing up Ft Chips higher levels of cancer.
Fort Chip's population consists mostly of First Nations members who tragically tend to have higher cancer risk due to other factors such as tobacco consumption.

Selenium is not a know carcinogen. Rather it worsens the effects of methyl mercury which is a common toxin produced when vegetation degrades anaerobically in reservoirs.

I don't think many communities tap either the Kootenay or Columbia for drinking water because they are fortunate enough to have clear mountain stream alternatives. The upstream Kootenay already has a pulp mill at Skookumchuck and a new gypsum mine approval at Canal Flats. The area is also littered with old mine sites. The big issue would be litigation from the American side.
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  #8964  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2018, 1:41 PM
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Foreign investment in US drops 32% in 2017



Foreign direct investment in the United States dropped 32 percent, or $120 billion, in 2017 as compared to the year before, according to new figures.

After a two-year spike in foreign investment, the Bureau of Economic Analysis found that the rate last year dropped to levels similar to 2014 and the years before the financial crisis.

The largest investments in the U.S. came from a handful of countries, with its northern neighbor Canada topping the list at $66.2 billion of investment, followed by the United Kingdom, Japan and France.
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  #8965  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2018, 8:26 PM
ssiguy ssiguy is offline
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While the plunge in foreign direct investment is a natural consequence of a looming trade war, the opposite could also be true...……...less US money going to other countries and instead investing at home. We saw this with Ford where the NAFTA meltdown forced them to cancel a new plant in Mexico and instead expand current ones in Detroit and Alabama.

A more telling figure and one that is a better indication of business confidence in the economy is TOTAL investment in business regardless of where it comes from. If foreigners are only investing $6 where they were once investing $10 but now Americans themselves are investing $15 as opposed to them only once investing $10 then the economy is better off.
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  #8966  
Old Posted Jul 16, 2018, 2:25 PM
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Curious what they're up to - we dont usually get this level of polling by another province, obviously.
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  #8967  
Old Posted Jul 16, 2018, 5:07 PM
lio45 lio45 is offline
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Originally Posted by Martin Mtl View Post
Foreign investment in US drops 32% in 2017



Foreign direct investment in the United States dropped 32 percent, or $120 billion, in 2017 as compared to the year before, according to new figures.

After a two-year spike in foreign investment, the Bureau of Economic Analysis found that the rate last year dropped to levels similar to 2014 and the years before the financial crisis.

The largest investments in the U.S. came from a handful of countries, with its northern neighbor Canada topping the list at $66.2 billion of investment, followed by the United Kingdom, Japan and France.
That's probably good news for the U.S., as ssiguy points out. If capital ceases to cross borders because of trade wars, bigger/richer countries are the ones that'll benefit most from keeping it at home.
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  #8968  
Old Posted Jul 16, 2018, 6:51 PM
MalcolmTucker MalcolmTucker is offline
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
That's probably good news for the U.S., as ssiguy points out. If capital ceases to cross borders because of trade wars, bigger/richer countries are the ones that'll benefit most from keeping it at home.
They don't benefit from keeping it at home. It isn't a zero sum game. Investment chases returns. If more is used domestically, not on a competitive basis but due to perceived risk, it drives down returns. FDI is in a nosedive, even more so in the rich world. We had previous super highs due to very high investment in the oil-sands as Canada was one of the few western world places with oil reserves ready to exploit (technology changed that and in turn caused more investment opportunities elsewhere and a collapse of oil prices)




In Canada we have outward investment flow due to an aging population still in prime savings years, and openness. We will be happy our country is chasing returns world wide when we can better afford the coming grey wave.




We have saved more:




Our outward stock is high (81% of GDP), we are good at saving, open, and like high returns:



Our inward stock is higher than the rich world (63% of GDP), we are a good place to invest:
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  #8969  
Old Posted Jul 16, 2018, 7:20 PM
ssiguy ssiguy is offline
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While I agree with you that there are real concerns about lower foreign investment in the US and what it means for capitol investment, this is why I stated that a better indicator is TOTAL foreign and domestic investment levels.

Large corporations have a stellar record of demanding corporate tax cuts to help their bottom line and makes them more profitable and innovative and then taking those tax cuts, cutting production and then using those savings to open a new plant in China or Mexico. With the large recent US corporate tax cut this helps ensure that more of that money stays in the US and within the US economy.
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  #8970  
Old Posted Jul 17, 2018, 2:11 AM
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Originally Posted by MalcolmTucker View Post
They don't benefit from keeping it at home. It isn't a zero sum game. Investment chases returns. If more is used domestically, not on a competitive basis but due to perceived risk, it drives down returns.
Of course returns are lower, but domestic investment drives local employment and business up in a way that generally more than makes up (in the grand scheme of things) for the lower returns.

What's better from an American point of view,

1) GM builds a factory in Mexico and, as an American corporation, enjoys slightly bigger margins than if the plant had been in the U.S.;

or 2) GM builds a factory in the U.S., makes cars there, and makes slightly less profit on those operations, while the thousands of people employed there pay state and federal income taxes (and use their wages to buy/spend locally)

?

Seems obvious to me that while #1 is, as you point out, the higher corporate returns scenario, #2 is the one that's better overall (for the economy in general).
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  #8971  
Old Posted Jul 17, 2018, 2:29 AM
milomilo milomilo is offline
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But we know it isn't overall, otherwise we'd have kept tariffs on everything and each country would have its own enclosed economy. You missed out the part where Americans then pay more to buy those cars and thus have less money to spend or invest on other things which are more efficiently produced. Scenario 2 makes everyone (in aggregate) poorer, scenario 1 makes them richer.
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  #8972  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2018, 4:09 PM
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Analysis of High Gas prices in Vancouver.

Approximately 60% of the energy needs are supplied by Alberta, the rest is imported from the south.

https://calgaryherald.com/news/canad..._autoplay=true
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  #8973  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2018, 6:42 PM
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  #8974  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2018, 11:33 PM
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Behavox Accelerates Growth with Opening of Research and Development Center in Montréal this Fall

FINANCIAL POST, MONTRÉAL — Behavox, a pioneering artificial intelligence data analytics firm, announced today they are opening a research and development center in Montréal, Québec, in August, to capitalize on the wealth of talent the city has to offer.

When at full capacity, the Montréal office will employ 200 individuals, most of whom will be technology professionals working on Behavox’s industry-leading enterprise data analytics platform, currently used by some of the world’s largest banks, broker-dealers and hedge funds.

Behavox’s machine learning software enables firms to search, interrogate, and generate immediate insights from enormous amounts of employee-generated data, including emails, text messages, trade data and voice calls, all tracked in real-time.

“Behavox is first and foremost a machine learning company and we are greatly attracted to the highly diverse technology talent Montréal has to offer,” said Erkin Adylov, Founder and CEO of Behavox. “Montréal is truly an AI development center, with voice and text analytics being particularly strong areas.”
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  #8975  
Old Posted Jul 19, 2018, 12:42 AM
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“Montréal is truly an AI development center, with voice and text analytics being particularly strong areas.”
Ha, the Fr-speaking, eh... Whether Canadian, Belgian, Gallic, Swiss...
Excellency over there, I know.
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  #8976  
Old Posted Jul 19, 2018, 1:10 AM
khabibulin khabibulin is offline
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Interesting
Could this be the result of Ontario having the highest minimum wage in the country? 17% higher than Quebec's.
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  #8977  
Old Posted Jul 19, 2018, 4:17 AM
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Could this be the result of Ontario having the highest minimum wage in the country? 17% higher than Quebec's.
You’re right, that 17% extra ($320/month) will help, a tiny bit, in compensating for the 60% higher rent and 100% higher hydro rates.

We’ll leave the children out of the discussion.
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  #8978  
Old Posted Jul 19, 2018, 5:18 AM
khabibulin khabibulin is offline
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Originally Posted by PBruge View Post
You’re right, that 17% extra ($320/month) will help, a tiny bit, in compensating for the 60% higher rent and 100% higher hydro rates.

We’ll leave the children out of the discussion.
Huh? I was only commenting on the minimum wage chart.
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  #8979  
Old Posted Jul 19, 2018, 10:52 AM
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This is our lives now

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  #8980  
Old Posted Jul 19, 2018, 1:49 PM
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This is our lives now

[IMG]http://i64.tinypic.com/2uzp5ir. jpg[ /IMG]
Therefore, future economic survival may depend on governments making difficult and politically unpopular decisions, thereby ensuring a succession of alternating governments.
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