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  #281  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2018, 12:50 AM
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Two that always pop up when I speak to visitors here:

1) How late the sun stays up in the summer. Obviously we are on NL time, but the sun sets a full 30 minutes later in Stephenville than it does in St. John's because it's so far west. This time of year that means you can be on the golf course until 9:30, it's great.

2) How far it is to get to St. John's. A woman from Halifax just started at my office and she was shocked to learn that she had an 8 hour drive to get to St. John's. Another time, I chatted to a family on the ferry coming to NL. They were coming to visit relatives who has recently moved to the area and wanted to know the best route for a day trip to St. John's. Poor mom was hoping to go to Costco but didn't realize it was 16 hours round trip.
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  #282  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2018, 12:56 AM
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^The straight line distance between the west coast and east coast isn't too huge (450-500 km) but our meandering TCH highway makes it unnecessarily long to get from one side to the other. In most other provinces, their highways are typically straight'ish.
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  #283  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2018, 1:38 AM
khabibulin khabibulin is offline
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Originally Posted by someone123 View Post
And it doesn't have an effect on objects at the ambient temperature. If it's +2 out with high winds, you won't find that rain changes to snow, the sidewalk freezes, plants get killed by frost. If it's -10 and windy it won't keep your car from starting.

You can dress for wind specifically by putting on a thin layer of material.
Wrong. My car in a detached, uninsulated garage starts much easier at -30, feels like -40, than when left out on the street (where it might not start in those conditions). And I have years of experience in Winnipeg to know of what I speak.
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  #284  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2018, 1:10 PM
megadude megadude is online now
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Overall Toronto is obviously a flat city, but we acknowledge there is change in grade here and there. Montreal is hillier. Well at least anywhere around Mt. Royal. Pittsburgh is the Paris of the Appalachians and has great ups and downs, but I'd never want to drive there in the winter.

Suburban TO in the Escarpment and Oak Ridges Moraine is another story. And somewhere I aspire to live on an estate.

Here's another example of change in grade. Have to do a 360 to see what I mean. This is around the corner from Casa Loma:

https://www.google.com/maps/@43.6768...7i13312!8i6656


Other examples of gently rolling hills or valleys:

https://www.google.com/maps/@43.6781...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@43.6750...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.ca/maps/@43.67296...7i13312!8i6656

Don Valley area as mentioned:
https://www.google.com/maps/@43.6731...7i13312!8i6656

Last edited by megadude; Jul 11, 2018 at 7:28 PM.
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  #285  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2018, 2:57 PM
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Someone from Southern Ontario asked if you needed a gas can driving through the prairies on the trans Canada highway. Living in Manitoba, I sometimes feel that Americans know more about the Canadian prairies than eastern Canadians.
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  #286  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2018, 6:41 PM
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Originally Posted by megadude View Post
Overall Toronto is obviously a flat city, but we acknowledge there is change in grade here and there. Montreal is hillier.

I'm not so sure about that. Montreal of course has a more extreme elevation change - 227m vs. Toronto's 131m - but beyond Mont Royal and some of the steep inclines of the adjacent neighbourhoods (Outremont, Westmount, McGill, a bit of the Plateau), the city is almost entirely flat. Toronto's hills & valleys aren't big, but are spread through most of the city. Here are the terrain maps of each of the two cities, for comparison: (darkened to show the topography better)




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  #287  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2018, 6:46 PM
megadude megadude is online now
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Ya I edited my post a few minutes later to say at least around Mt. Royal. I've been to Montreal I'd say 11 times and thought about it. And realized I was thinking more about one general area. On my most recent trip I spent a lot of time driving on Mt. Royal and some of the rich neighbourhoods around there.
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  #288  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2018, 6:55 PM
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Though I guess it also goes without saying that those hilly Montreal neighbourhoods are much more civically important and tourist-friendly neighbourhoods than Toronto's.
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  #289  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2018, 7:03 PM
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Originally Posted by dennis View Post
Someone from Southern Ontario asked if you needed a gas can driving through the prairies on the trans Canada highway. Living in Manitoba, I sometimes feel that Americans know more about the Canadian prairies than eastern Canadians.
That is so true. When I was living on TO I was asked by a coworked if I had to camp along the highway some nights if I couldn't make it to the next town.

Driven the route quite a few times. When I hauled a 40ft boat trailer across country I found there was a Husky every 4 hours.
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  #290  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2018, 12:48 AM
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Canada's cities have their pros and their cons, but most of our 20 largest cities have an interesting natural setting. Some are knockout gorgeous on first sight, while others are interesting when you think about it, but there are very few* major cities that don't have at least something like a major river, body of water, hilly backdrop, valleys or cliffs.

There are some very big, important cities in the world that are situated on some flat, featureless plain without even a river running through their core.

*Regina would be the biggest one that comes to mind. Or maybe London, ON.
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  #291  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2018, 2:00 AM
kwoldtimer kwoldtimer is online now
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Originally Posted by hipster duck View Post
Canada's cities have their pros and their cons, but most of our 20 largest cities have an interesting natural setting. Some are knockout gorgeous on first sight, while others are interesting when you think about it, but there are very few* major cities that don't have at least something like a major river, body of water, hilly backdrop, valleys or cliffs.

There are some very big, important cities in the world that are situated on some flat, featureless plain without even a river running through their core.

*Regina would be the biggest one that comes to mind. Or maybe London, ON.
Kitchener-Waterloo would likely be very low on that list.
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  #292  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2018, 10:54 PM
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Trevor3 Trevor3 is offline
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Originally Posted by Marty_Mcfly View Post
^The straight line distance between the west coast and east coast isn't too huge (450-500 km) but our meandering TCH highway makes it unnecessarily long to get from one side to the other. In most other provinces, their highways are typically straight'ish.
Definitely. I want to try the mid - Island route when I go to St. John's in September. I have a 4x4 jeep and want to see the condition of it, plus see if it cuts any driving off. It'll end up being about the same length of time but should cut some actual distance off.
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  #293  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2018, 11:57 PM
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Originally Posted by hipster duck View Post
Canada's cities have their pros and their cons, but most of our 20 largest cities have an interesting natural setting. Some are knockout gorgeous on first sight, while others are interesting when you think about it, but there are very few* major cities that don't have at least something like a major river, body of water, hilly backdrop, valleys or cliffs.

There are some very big, important cities in the world that are situated on some flat, featureless plain without even a river running through their core.

*Regina would be the biggest one that comes to mind. Or maybe London, ON.
Regina has Wascana Creek that runs through the city and a large lake that is one of the main features of Wascana Park.

Albert Memorial Bridge
Linking the north and south shores of the lake is the Albert Memorial Bridge. Said to be the longest bridge over the shortest span of water, the bridge decorated in terracotta balusters and buffalo heads is a memorial to soldiers of the First World War.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wascan...emorial_Bridge
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  #294  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2018, 2:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hipster duck View Post
Canada's cities have their pros and their cons, but most of our 20 largest cities have an interesting natural setting. Some are knockout gorgeous on first sight, while others are interesting when you think about it, but there are very few* major cities that don't have at least something like a major river, body of water, hilly backdrop, valleys or cliffs.

There are some very big, important cities in the world that are situated on some flat, featureless plain without even a river running through their core.

*Regina would be the biggest one that comes to mind. Or maybe London, ON.
Quote:
Originally Posted by VANRIDERFAN View Post
Regina has Wascana Creek that runs through the city and a large lake that is one of the main features of Wascana Park.

Albert Memorial Bridge
Linking the north and south shores of the lake is the Albert Memorial Bridge. Said to be the (World's) longest bridge over the shortest span of water, the bridge decorated in terracotta balusters and buffalo heads is a memorial to soldiers of the First World War.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wascan...emorial_Bridge

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wascana_Centre

Regina's Wascana Lake & it's park does seem to be a major enigma for Canadian's that have never been to Regina.
A few additional noteworthy items about the park besides what VANRIDERFAN mentioned:

Wascana Park, is notable in Canada for being larger than New York City's Central Park at 843 acres (3.4 km2) and Vancouver's Stanley Park at 1,000 acres (4 km2) and as the fourth largest urban park in Canada.

Wascana Park was designed by the Seattle architect Minoru Yamasaki — famous for design of the original World Trade Center in New York City.

Trafalgar Fountain in Wascana Park, sitting just east of Saskatchewan's Legislature building, designed by Charles Barry in Peterhead granite and built by McDonald & Leslie, Aberdeen, stood in London, England's Trafalgar Square from 1845 to 1939.


http://wascana.ca/things-to-see-and-...algar-fountain

The Regina Tornado of 1912 began it's Canadian record breaking destruction in Wascana Park, before its path headed north into the city centre...



The Largest Western Painted Turtle ever found in North America was found in Wascana Park in 2015 and that particular individual turtle may be older than Saskatchewan's 110+ year history it's self.



http://www.thestarphoenix.com/techno...225/story.html
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  #295  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2018, 2:24 AM
ZeDgE ZeDgE is offline
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Originally Posted by dennis View Post
Someone from Southern Ontario asked if you needed a gas can driving through the prairies on the trans Canada highway. Living in Manitoba, I sometimes feel that Americans know more about the Canadian prairies than eastern Canadians.
Years of lurking in this forum I can confirm this is truth. The same can be said for the west coast and lower main land.
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  #296  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2018, 2:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Marty_Mcfly View Post
^The straight line distance between the west coast and east coast isn't too huge (450-500 km) but our meandering TCH highway makes it unnecessarily long to get from one side to the other. In most other provinces, their highways are typically straight'ish.
To be fair, in most other provinces they don't have rocks and mountains. BC's highways are the furthest thing from straight too.
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