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View Poll Results: Which Canadian news network do you prefer?
CBC 53 60.23%
CTV 20 22.73%
Global 6 6.82%
Other 9 10.23%
Voters: 88. You may not vote on this poll

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  #21  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2018, 5:37 PM
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Originally Posted by elly63 View Post
Aside from Don Cherry, are there any Conservatively minded people at CBC? Kevin O'Leary is gone isn't he?
Andrew Coyne? Tasha Kheiriddin?
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  #22  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2018, 5:53 PM
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The CBC's French radio network Radio-Canada is my background in the house as well, and more often than not in the car too.
When driving it's always NPR (my first choice) or then CBC (in English, to help me practice) which is my second choice whenever I leave the zones where I can catch NPR.

NPR has really balanced coverage of all issues, with a global view as well. It's my favorite source.
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  #23  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2018, 6:08 PM
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NPR is available on Sirius. I listen to it occasionally.

Usually when I'm in my car driving around, it'll be CBC One. If not, my other go to is BBC World Service.
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  #24  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2018, 6:12 PM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
When driving it's always NPR (my first choice) or then CBC (in English, to help me practice) which is my second choice whenever I leave the zones where I can catch NPR.

NPR has really balanced coverage of all issues, with a global view as well. It's my favorite source.
Winnipeg is less than an hour away from the US border, but sadly you can't easily tune in NPR. It would add so much to the radio spectrum if it were readily available here.

(Maybe on a winter day you could catch the AM signal, but that's about it I think...)
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  #25  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2018, 6:14 PM
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I don't really watch TV but I also find CBC radio has shifted dramatically toward social justice issues during the past few years, and away from substantive news stories (international coverage or current events, deeper policy discussions, etc.). I am not against some coverage of social justice issues but they don't merit 80% of the airtime or whatever they get. I also find that the radio commentators tend to have fairly narrow political perspectives.
I mean, that might be true of CBC, but the rest of the talk radio sphere is nothing but right wing hosts and callers whining about how bad the government/taxes/feminism/refugees/the gays/SJWs are.
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  #26  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2018, 6:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Boris2k7 View Post
I mean, that might be true of CBC, but the rest of the talk radio sphere is nothing but right wing hosts and callers whining about how bad the government/taxes/feminism/refugees/SJWs are.
Yes, even in Ottawa the talk radio (non-CBC anyway) is like that.
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  #27  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2018, 6:21 PM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
NPR has really balanced coverage of all issues, with a global view as well. It's my favorite source.
Something to ponder

Former NPR CEO opens up about liberal media bias
Ken Stern NY Post October 21, 2017
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  #28  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2018, 6:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Boris2k7 View Post
I mean, that might be true of CBC, but the rest of the talk radio sphere is nothing but right wing hosts and callers whining about how bad the government/taxes/feminism/refugees/SJWs are.
I agree but what is the significance of this? The CBC counterbalances these somehow? From my perspective as a listener that doesn't matter. I am just disappointed that the quality of stories on CBC radio isn't higher.

Creating two highly polarized sets of stations and listeners isn't healthy anyway even if it is somehow balanced on average.

My objection doesn't have much to do with bias either. I am okay with hearing from an ultra liberal or ultra conservative commentator assuming they have interesting things to say (although usually the more objective the commentator the less politically aligned they are!).

I also don't mind if it is teary-eyed but I like there to be some meat to the story. In too many cases the reporting is highly subjective and the only real takeaway is that someone should feel bad. This is true of a lot of journalism today. It amounts to:

- Identify two groups
- Show that they have different outcomes somehow. Ideally a group that gets more sympathy has worse outcomes.
- Q.E.D.
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  #29  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2018, 6:29 PM
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I don't watch Live TV unless I have to (as in I'm at my parents or they are visiting).

For news, I have CBC NB on my RSS feed for my main news source, otherwise I have some message boards that seem to be quicker on the uptake than the main networks.

Similarly CBC and a few others sites are followed on FB. I'll get a subset of CTV news as well filtered through the local radio station's FB News feed (they're a Bell Media station)

For general TV watching, I have the PVR record what I want on whatever channel suits best, and watch and FF through non-show elements at a later date. So CBC/Global/CTV are effectively meaningless, until/unless the schedules for the US shows I'm recording conflict (CTV or Global bought 2 shows they 'need' to simulcast at the same time), and one suddenly gets bumped to Midnight or over to CTV2 or something like that.

The closest I get to listening to a regular news program is the local news on the local radio stations in the morning. I do listen to a couple of over the air rock or classic rock/pop stations, so I listen to their 5 minutes of news/sports/weather every 30 in the morning. Otherwise, I don't follow any network's news program.
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  #30  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2018, 6:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boris2k7 View Post
I mean, that might be true of CBC, but the rest of the talk radio sphere is nothing but right wing hosts and callers whining about how bad the government/taxes/feminism/refugees/the gays/SJWs are.
This is true. As much as CBC Radio annoys me with its heavy SJW agenda, the other talk radio on the dial is right wing garbage.

The reasonable centre is becoming a lonely place these days due to the tug-of-war political dynamic.
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  #31  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2018, 6:37 PM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
When driving it's always NPR (my first choice) or then CBC (in English, to help me practice) which is my second choice whenever I leave the zones where I can catch NPR.

NPR has really balanced coverage of all issues, with a global view as well. It's my favorite source.
I can only get NPR from northern New York State very occasionally in Gatineau. Usually in the winter. It's a bit better in southern parts of Ottawa but I don't go there that often.

NPR kinda reminds me of what CBC used to be like when I first started paying attention to it (and Radio-Canada).
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  #32  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2018, 6:39 PM
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Originally Posted by esquire View Post
Winnipeg is less than an hour away from the US border, but sadly you can't easily tune in NPR. It would add so much to the radio spectrum if it were readily available here.
Yeah, they aren't broadcasting very powerfully. Lots of little stations though, most towns have their own.

Two days ago I just did my "bank loop" from Sherbrooke to go to the nearest TD Bank in Barton VT then to my land in NH then back home. First I'm starting with 91.7 FM (CBC in Sherbrooke), then I start to catch 107.9 FM (VPR from Burlington) about when I leave city limits on the freeway (around Magog), then on I-91 going south I start to lose it and have to switch to 88.5 FM (VPR from St. Johnsbury), which I then start losing going east from the bank into the hills and then I start to catch 90.3 FM (NHPR in Colebrook NH), which I catch perfectly well on my land and which I start to lose around Coaticook on the way back home, which is when I switch back to 91.7 FM (CBC Sherbrooke).

The programming isn't the same between VPR and NHPR at all. It's happened to me occasionally that the content on VPR was super interesting but I was losing signal, and the NHPR content at that exact moment wasn't of much interest. I once toyed with the idea of turning around, parking the car, and continuing to listen, but I never went that far I listen to radio because I'm driving to somewhere, not the other way around!
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  #33  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2018, 6:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I can only get NPR from northern New York State very occasionally in Gatineau. Usually in the winter. It's a bit better in southern parts of Ottawa but I don't go there that often.

NPR kinda reminds me of what CBC used to be like when I first started paying attention to it (and Radio-Canada).
In my observations, the weather seems to make a pretty big difference in how far you can catch a given FM station. I'm actually impressed you can catch it in Gatineau even on the most overcast days.
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  #34  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2018, 6:41 PM
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Yeah, they aren't broadcasting very powerfully. Lots of little stations though, most towns have their own.
Yes, I've noticed that... once I get to Minnesota/North Dakota it doesn't take long before NPR stations fade out.

That contrasts with Winnipeg's major radio stations which carry for comparatively huge distances. Maybe it's an effect of the US being more densely populated?
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  #35  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2018, 6:45 PM
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In my observations, the weather seems to make a pretty big difference in how far you can catch a given FM station. I'm actually impressed you can catch it in Gatineau even on the most overcast days.
As the crow flies it's probably a bit less than 100 km to the first American soil from Gatineau.

I sometimes get commercial radio stations from the border area too. They're generally American (the news is all American for example) but they say things like "right now it's 32 degrees in Odgensburg, 35 in Potsdam, zero in Prescott and minus one in Brockville".
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  #36  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2018, 6:47 PM
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I don't really watch TV but I also find CBC radio has shifted dramatically toward social justice issues during the past few years, and away from substantive news stories (international coverage or current events, deeper policy discussions, etc.). I am not against some coverage of social justice issues but they don't merit 80% of the airtime or whatever they get. I also find that the radio commentators tend to have fairly narrow political perspectives.
I find that CBC radio will latch onto a subject and cover it to death. Even if I’m sympathetic I find that, after several months of constant bludgeoning, I just can’t take it any more. “Oh no, they’ve found yet another trans person who wants to tell us their story! Argh!”

If they listen to CBC radio, someone from another country could be forgiven for thinking the Canadian population is approaching 50% trans!
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  #37  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2018, 6:48 PM
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Originally Posted by elly63 View Post
Something to ponder

Former NPR CEO opens up about liberal media bias
Ken Stern NY Post October 21, 2017
Wow... he's an awesome knowledge-seeker. The true spirit of journalism. Bravo.

I wonder if he was denounced as a traitor, a closet Trump supporter... or worse. Or if he got death threats...
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  #38  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2018, 6:53 PM
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Yes, I've noticed that... once I get to Minnesota/North Dakota it doesn't take long before NPR stations fade out.

That contrasts with Winnipeg's major radio stations which carry for comparatively huge distances. Maybe it's an effect of the US being more densely populated?
I think it's mostly due to catchment area / city size. If you're a major radio station in Winnipeg, it makes sense to pay more to have broadcasting power that can be received all over Southern Manitoba, because those people are all potential listeners, and potential customers for your Winnipeg-based advertisers.

If there was a Winnipeg-sized city in ND, it would probably broadcast like Winnipeg does.

I'm almost certain NPR in Burlington broadcasts significantly more powerfully than the Colebrook and St. Johnsbury stations. I get the Burlington one pretty clearly in the Townships and in the Montreal area - that's a much bigger radius than the other two.

And based on my drives across the US, I also recall I don't have to change stations too often when in heavily populated corridors. Pretty sure I catch NPR from Washington DC deep into Virginia, etc.

This all makes business sense when you think about it. A radio station from a given city doesn't need to broadcast beyond the catchment area of the city in question, while they also don't want to leave too many listeners out. It results in an equilibrium point where broadcasting power of major stations is correlated to a city's catchment area.
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  #39  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2018, 6:58 PM
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My objection doesn't have much to do with bias either. I am okay with hearing from an ultra liberal or ultra conservative commentator assuming they have interesting things to say (although usually the more objective the commentator the less politically aligned they are!).
I don't have a problem with that if both sides would admit that's what they are.
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  #40  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2018, 6:59 PM
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Originally Posted by someone123 View Post
I agree but what is the significance of this? The CBC counterbalances these somehow? From my perspective as a listener that doesn't matter. I am just disappointed that the quality of stories on CBC radio isn't higher.

Creating two highly polarized sets of stations and listeners isn't healthy anyway even if it is somehow balanced on average.

My objection doesn't have much to do with bias either. I am okay with hearing from an ultra liberal or ultra conservative commentator assuming they have interesting things to say (although usually the more objective the commentator the less politically aligned they are!).

I also don't mind if it is teary-eyed but I like there to be some meat to the story. In too many cases the reporting is highly subjective and the only real takeaway is that someone should feel bad. This is true of a lot of journalism today. It amounts to:

- Identify two groups
- Show that they have different outcomes somehow. Ideally a group that gets more sympathy has worse outcomes.
- Q.E.D.
If anyone *actually* cares about a media landscape where all viewpoints are represented, then yes, it matters that there's one place on the radio dial where that content can land. I believe the counterbalance actually does matter in the big picture, although I also tend to tune out as a listener.
Besides, there's podcasts and web radio if all you really want is a group of yuppies trying their utmost to be inoffensive while they calmly debate policy from their ivory towers. That fills most of my workday.
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