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  #41  
Old Posted Nov 6, 2012, 6:37 PM
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http://www.teamfredericton.com/en/co...asp?_mid_=2848

There are not really any Stats on our provinces capital. I thought I would throw some in. I believe this past the building permits shelled out was in the 90 some million or so. down from the past few years but average for population size. Has been 110 million plus the past few I believe.
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  #42  
Old Posted Nov 6, 2012, 7:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Bishop2047 View Post
http://www.teamfredericton.com/en/co...asp?_mid_=2848

There are not really any Stats on our provinces capital. I thought I would throw some in. I believe this past the building permits shelled out was in the 90 some million or so. down from the past few years but average for population size. Has been 110 million plus the past few I believe.
I have included Freddy in most of the tables I made (see top of 1st page). The main issue is that Freddy is not a CMA yet, and CMAs get the most attention as the largest centers in the country. Freddy will most likely get that designation in 10 years (not next census, but the one after).
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---Moncton-----------(NB)
(ER)-------209,256---(1st)
(CMA)-----144,810---(1st)
(POPCTR)-108,620--(1st)
(CSD)------71,889---(1st)----------*Be Magically Transported to Downtown Moncton in Autumn*
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  #43  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2013, 8:23 PM
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These are the Q4 population estimates for Canada and each of the Atlantic Canadian provinces for 2011 and 2012:

Canada.................................34,606,354...35,002,447
Newfoundland and Labrador.....513,586......513,555
Prince Edward Island...............146,079......146,205
Nova Scotia............................949,213......947,831
New Brunswick.......................755,586......755,346

There was a lot of hand wringing in the media in NB over the last week because our population went down for the first time in the last six years, but our population is only down marginally year over year, and the population loss in NS was greater than it was here.

Year to year change:

NB. -240
NS. -1,382
NL. -31
PE. +126

It's never a good thing to see population decline, but I think the media reaction in NB was a little overblown......
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  #44  
Old Posted Jan 6, 2013, 9:29 PM
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It's never a good thing to see population decline, but I think the media reaction in NB was a little overblown......
I hope you're right
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  #45  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2013, 6:48 PM
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Saw this on the CBC website today, but it's been there since October now. (Just hasn't caught my eye 'till now):

New Brunswick Mayors’ Salaries and Expenses

It lists the Mayor salaries and expenses for Bathurst, Campbellton, Dieppe, Edmundston, Fredericton, Miramichi, Moncton and Saint John.

And from the same block of interactive sites:

Ranking salaries of city officials (also from Oct 2012).
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  #46  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2013, 11:40 PM
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The CBC's been on a bit of a public salary witch hunt the past few months. I sure as hell wouldn't put up with what a mayor of a city of 70,000 people has to deal with for $65,000 a year.

And the flack they gave city managers was totally unjustified as well. I'd challenge you to find anyone in the private sector with as many responsibilities and staff under their direction as a city manager who makes less than what ours are paid.

The fact of the matter is, if we want competent people to apply for positions, we need to pay them accordingly. Otherwise we'll be forever scraping the bottom of the barrel because all but the most selfless and publicly-minded will have gone for private sector jobs instead.

/rant
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  #47  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2013, 2:46 AM
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Absolutely agree!

If you want to attract the best talent to civic administration, you have to be prepared to pay them accordingly. To do otherwise is false economy. If you have inferior leadership then the actual costs of civic adminstration might actually go up as incompetence has it's own inherent liabilities.

I wish CBC (and the other media) would get off this witchhunt. I don't know if it is envy or what, but it is an awful Canadian trait to tear down successful people. This attitude has to stop!
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  #48  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2013, 3:25 AM
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It's sensationalism. You drive pageviews by running 'exposés' to get people riled up. If there was ever a mountain made of a molehill, these types of stories would be it.
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  #49  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2013, 3:38 AM
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Absolutely agree!

If you want to attract the best talent to civic administration, you have to be prepared to pay them accordingly. To do otherwise is false economy. If you have inferior leadership then the actual costs of civic adminstration might actually go up as incompetence has it's own inherent liabilities.

I wish CBC (and the other media) would get off this witchhunt. I don't know if it is envy or what, but it is an awful Canadian trait to tear down successful people. This attitude has to stop!
Well, I do agree that it's important to make sure that cities are able to offer administrators competitive salaries, but it all adds up. I wouldn't be surprised if many canadian cities (Halifax included) dedicated a very significant amount of their operating budget towards administration, leaving less to go around for everyone/everything else. This isn't necessarily problematic, but it could be. I'm not sure if it's appropriate for the CBC to be identifying these people by name (I haven't been following this so I don't know if they have been) but I do think that the public deserves to know, at least statistically, what percentage of their tax dollars are going toward administrators' salaries.
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  #50  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2013, 3:57 AM
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They name names and give intimate details about salary levels, bonuses and pensions. It's inexcusable. You could easily take a better job with a higher salary in the private sector and escape this scrutiny. I mean, why bother?
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  #51  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2013, 4:01 AM
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I mean, why bother?
For Queen and Country, or something like that.
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  #52  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2013, 5:00 AM
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They name names and give intimate details about salary levels, bonuses and pensions. It's inexcusable. You could easily take a better job with a higher salary in the private sector and escape this scrutiny. I mean, why bother?
You could also move to Fort Mac and make $250,000/year driving a truck, yet most people don't. It comes down to personal values I guess.
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  #53  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2013, 5:49 AM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
If you want to attract the best talent to civic administration, you have to be prepared to pay them accordingly.

...

I wish CBC (and the other media) would get off this witchhunt. I don't know if it is envy or what, but it is an awful Canadian trait to tear down successful people. This attitude has to stop!
Actually I am surprised at how little money the mayors make.

Something else that should be factored in is that they have to run for re-election every few years, which takes a lot of effort and adds a lot of uncertainty.

I don't think municipal politics are very attractive for most professionals. If you are successful you'd have to be crazy (or really care about a city) to invest a bunch of effort into possibly getting a job with mediocre pay, foregoing professional development in your chosen field, and then maybe suddenly losing your job a few years later. It is no surprise that we see career politicians at the mid-range or above and a disproportionate number of retirees or people with poor employment prospects at the low end.
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  #54  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2013, 3:15 AM
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I don't think municipal politics are very attractive for most professionals. If you are successful you'd have to be crazy (or really care about a city) to invest a bunch of effort into possibly getting a job with mediocre pay, foregoing professional development in your chosen field, and then maybe suddenly losing your job a few years later. It is no surprise that we see career politicians at the mid-range or above and a disproportionate number of retirees or people with poor employment prospects at the low end.
I assumed he was talking about non-elected positions like CAO.
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  #55  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2013, 3:36 AM
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I assumed he was talking about non-elected positions like CAO.
Indeed I was, but someone123's comments about elected politicians are equally valid.

In terms of most Atlantic Canadian mayors and councillors however, their municipal jobs are part time positions. Mayor George LeBlanc in Moncton maintains his legal practice in addition to his poliitical job.
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  #56  
Old Posted Jan 31, 2013, 11:53 PM
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Interesting data regarding migration patterns for the four Atlantic Canadian CMAs. This was found by someone123. The data is from the 2006 census.

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tabl...emo57a-eng.htm

.................................St.John's........Halifax........Moncton........Saint John
Internal migrants........... 26,760........ 39,765........ 21,715.......... 15,045
Intraprovincial migrants.. 16,830........ 13,330........ 14,600.......... 10,475
Interprovincial migrants... 9,930........ 26,435.......... 7,115........... 4,570
External migrants............ 2,180.......... 7,965.......... 1,390........... 1,835

Analysis;

- Not surprisingly, Halifax receives the largest number of migrants amongst the regional cities, but it's dominance isn't absolute. Migration to Moncton is proportionately similar to migration to Halifax (corrected for baseline population).
- A large number of migrants to Halifax are from other provinces, while with all the other regional cities, the major source of population gain is from other areas within their own provinces.
- Saint John in particular appears to be lagging in interprovincial migration.
- Moncton recieved the fewest international migrants in this data collected in 2006. (I think this is changing, it would be interesting to see updated results)
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Last edited by MonctonRad; Feb 1, 2013 at 12:09 AM.
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  #57  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2013, 4:25 PM
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Same data presented a slightly different way:

Halifax Total migrants 47,730 (2006 census period)

- Intraprovincial migrants - 13,330 (27.9%)
- Interprovincial migrants - 26,435 (55.4%)
- International migrants - 7,965 (16.7%)

St. John's Total migrants 28,945

- Intraprovincial migrants - 16,830 (58.1%)
- Interprovincial migrants - 9,930 (34.3%)
- International migrants - 2,180 (7.5%)

Moncton Total migrants 23,105

- Intraprovincial migrants - 14,600 (63.2%)
- Interprovincial migrants - 7,115 (30.8%)
- International migrants - 1,390 (6.0%)

Saint John Total migrants 16,880

- Intraprovincial migrants - 10,475 (62.1%)
- Interprovincial migrants - 4,570 (27.1%)
- International migrants - 1,835 (10.9%)

I find it quite interesting just how proportionately small the relative contribution of intraprovincial migration is to the HRM. I wonder in the long term if this will worsen the urban/rural disconnect in Nova Scotia. I could see how outlying citizens of the province might start thinking of the city as somewhat of a foreign entity in the long term. Similarly, urban residents of HRM, if they have no connections to the remainder of the province, might view the rural folk with increasing contempt. Food for thought.....
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Last edited by MonctonRad; Feb 1, 2013 at 4:52 PM.
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  #58  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2013, 4:39 PM
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Holy OCD .....
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  #59  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2013, 9:12 PM
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It would be interesting to see the outmigration stats as well. These stats by themselves can be misleading.
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  #60  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2013, 5:32 PM
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Updated CMA Population Estimates July 2012

Halifax...........413,700 (increase of 4,000 from 2011)
St. John's.......200,600 (increase of 3,100 from 2011)
Moncton.........143,000 (increase of 2,300 from 2011)
Saint John......128,900 (increase of 400 from 2011)

Source - Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tabl...emo05a-fra.htm

Moncton has surpassed Guelph this year and is now ranked as the 28th largest CMA in Canada

And congrats to St. John's for cracking the 200k barrier!
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Last edited by MonctonRad; Feb 6, 2013 at 5:47 PM.
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