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  #81  
Old Posted Mar 22, 2013, 6:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mmmatt View Post
Moncton and SJ CMAs accounted for more than half of that. Moncton 52M, SJ 31M. That said monthly permit values fluctuate so dramatically in small places like SJ/Monc/Fred and even NB as a whole...doesn't really mean anything because one large project can skew the numbers so much. The longer term trends are more useful. (Ex: my graph on the top of this page)
True, but throw me a bone and let me be happy for a while New Brunswick is battered by bad news left and right.
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  #82  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2013, 7:04 PM
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Originally Posted by KnoxfordGuy View Post
I read in the Telegraph today that Stats Can says NB lost some 1000 people leaving the province last year. This is not good news.
The NB population may have dropped by 1137 last year, but the NS population dropped by 1700. This is somewhat surprising as NS is supposed to have a better economy (and better economic prospects) than us these days.

Both PEI and NL had modest population increases last year.
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  #83  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2013, 12:13 AM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
The NB population may have dropped by 1137 last year, but the NS population dropped by 1700. This is somewhat surprising as NS is supposed to have a better economy (and better economic prospects) than us these days.

Both PEI and NL had modest population increases last year.
I completely disagree that Nova Scotia has a better economy than New Brunswick, now, or in the near future.

Both provinces have most of their municipalities that are decline, with very minor areas of growth -- and even that growth is questionable in its long-term sustainability. One of the main differences between the two provinces are their migrations of population: Nova Scotia is losing more people (than New Brunswick) to Alberta, Ontario, and Quebec (Montreal), while Halifax's growth is fed by interprovincial and foreign immigrants. Moncton's growth is more intraprovincial.

Shipbuilding is giving Halifax a boost, but most of the city's development is in the form of unorganised, unsustainable, suburban projects. Conditions are improving ever so slightly on the peninsula, but areas of Bedford, Dartmouth, Halifax West, and Sackville are sporting development that is going to add a lot of debt to the city's budget due to the forced expansion of infrastructure and public services to this urban sprawl. The sprawl would be more economically manageable if it were only 50% of the city's development -- but it's currently over 80%...

HRM hasn't learned its lesson yet, it would appear.

If a West-to-East pipeline happens and eventually ends with refinement potential in Saint John, the Province of New Brunswick could have a decent number of long-term jobs to feed its economy. It wouldn't be feasible to extend the pipeline to Halifax, where many refinery upgrades would be necessary. Saint John is a deepwater port that already has the capacity to refine the oil.

Moncton appears to be focusing more on bilingualism, so even though the northern areas of the province are in decline, these francophones are, by in large, moving to Dieppe and Moncton (and even Riverview).
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  #84  
Old Posted May 17, 2013, 3:20 PM
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An interesting interactive map:

New Brunswick’s migration patterns 1996-2012

http://www.cbc.ca/nb/features/employment/migration/
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  #85  
Old Posted May 17, 2013, 3:44 PM
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Originally Posted by pierremoncton View Post
An interesting interactive map:

New Brunswick’s migration patterns 1996-2012

http://www.cbc.ca/nb/features/employment/migration/
Wow! That big red balloon over greater Moncton and southeastern NB is inflating so rapidly, it looks like it's about ready to pop!!
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  #86  
Old Posted Jun 7, 2013, 1:21 PM
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New Brunswick gained 3700 jobs in May according to Stats Can. That shows our unemployment rate dropped from 10.9% to 10.5%...not great mind you but it's better then going up.

Here are the provincial stats across Canada:
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quoti...07a003-eng.htm
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  #87  
Old Posted Jun 7, 2013, 2:00 PM
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Good news KnoxfordGuy.

Here are the provincial rates for Atlantic Canada (with last months rates in parentheses)

NS - 8.7% (9.0%)
PE - 9.4% (9.9%)
NB - 10.5% (10.9%)
NL - 11.6% (12.4%)
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  #88  
Old Posted Jun 7, 2013, 3:08 PM
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Down across the board. But it's probably a reflection of our Tourist Season kicking off as much as anything. Still, it's good to see it going down regardless.
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  #89  
Old Posted Jun 7, 2013, 6:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post


Good news KnoxfordGuy.

Here are the provincial rates for Atlantic Canada (with last months rates in parentheses)

NS - 8.7% (9.0%)
PE - 9.4% (9.9%)
NB - 10.5% (10.9%)
NL - 11.6% (12.4%)
That's the wrong number for PEI, you took the unemploment stat not the unemployment rate stat. Should be 11.2 down from 11.6.
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  #90  
Old Posted Jun 7, 2013, 10:53 PM
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Originally Posted by PoscStudent View Post
That's the wrong number for PEI, you took the unemploment stat not the unemployment rate stat. Should be 11.2 down from 11.6.
Whoops, you're right!

I was in a hurry doing that at work today and didn't check the numbers carefully enough. Anytime I get into trouble with a post, it's usually because I'm in a rush at work. I've got to stop doing that!

I thought that it was unusual that the NB rate was higher than the PEI rate.... Oh well.

Revised Provincial Unemployment Table:

NS - 8.7% (9.0%)
NB - 10.5% (10.9%)
PE - 11.2% (11.6%)
NL - 11.6% (12.4%)

Metro Unemployment Rates:

Moncton - 6.9% (6.7%)
Saint John - 10.2% (9.2%)

Economic Region Unemployment Rates:

Fredericton/Oromocto - 7.5%
Moncton/Richibuctou - 9.5%
Saint John/St Stephens - 11.2%
Edmundston/Woodstock - 12.3%
Campbellton/Miramichi - 19.1%
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  #91  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2013, 2:48 PM
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Population by Mother Tongue, Atlantic CMA's (2011 Census)

Halifax

- English......348,740
- French........10,160
- Arabic..........5,175
- Chinese........3,530
- German........1,250
- Other...........8,390

St. John's

- English.......188,970
- Chinese.........1,030
- French.............815
- Arabic.............370
- Spanish...........345
- Other............2,065

Moncton

- English.........83,585
- French..........46,955
- Arabic..............325
- Chinese............295
- Spanish............255
- Other.............1,560

Saint John

- English.........116,035
- French.............5,520
- Chinese..............600
- Arabic................390
- Spanish..............310
- Other...............1,650

I wonder why StatsCan didn't separate out other languages like Korean or Japanese? There is quite a large Korean community in Moncton for example. I wouldn't be surprised if a majority of the 1,560 "other" respondents to the 2011 census in the Moncton area weren't Koreans.......
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  #92  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2013, 3:45 PM
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I thought the same thing when I was reading these stats. My wife is an English as a second language teacher and nearly half or her students are Korean. Most of whom have come with their entire families.
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  #93  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2013, 4:18 PM
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Sorry, but too much to format. Moncton, for 2011:

Detailed mother tongue - Total population excluding institutional residents 19 136145
Single responses 133945
English 83580
French 46955
Non-official languages 3400
Selected Aboriginal languages 20 25
Atikamekw 0
Cree; n.o.s. 5
Dene 0
Innu/Montagnais 0
Inuktitut 0
Mi'kmaq 20
Ojibway 0
Oji-Cree 0
Stoney 0
Selected non-Aboriginal languages 21 3255
African languages; n.i.e. 5
Afrikaans 10
Akan (Twi) 0
Albanian 10
Amharic 0
Arabic 320
Armenian 5
Bantu languages; n.i.e. 25
Bengali 15
Berber languages (Kabyle) 5
Bisayan languages 15
Bosnian 0
Bulgarian 10
Burmese 5
Cantonese 70
Chinese; n.o.s. 150
Creoles 30
Croatian 10
Czech 5
Danish 5
Dutch 160
Estonian 0
Finnish 10
Flemish 10
Fukien 0
German 235
Greek 15
Gujarati 5
Hakka 0
Hebrew 5
Hindi 25
Hungarian 30
Ilocano 0
Indo-Iranian languages; n.i.e. 5
Italian 180
Japanese 25
Khmer (Cambodian) 0
Korean 555
Kurdish 0
Lao 0
Latvian 0
Lingala 5
Lithuanian 0
Macedonian 0
Malay 0
Malayalam 10
Maltese 0
Mandarin 75
Marathi 5
Nepali 0
Niger-Congo languages; n.i.e. 85
Norwegian 10
Oromo 20
Panjabi (Punjabi) 30
Pashto 5
Persian (Farsi) 65
Polish 55
Portuguese 35
Romanian 45
Rundi (Kirundi) 15
Russian 70
Rwanda (Kinyarwanda) 15
Semitic languages; n.i.e. 5
Serbian 5
Serbo-Croatian 5
Shanghainese 0
Sign languages; n.i.e. 10
Sindhi 0
Sinhala (Sinhalese) 0
Sino-Tibetan languages; n.i.e. 25
Slavic languages; n.i.e. 0
Slovak 5
Slovenian 0
Somali 0
Spanish 250
Swahili 90
Swedish 5
Tagalog (Pilipino; Filipino) 140
Taiwanese 0
Tamil 15
Telugu 15
Thai 0
Tibetan languages 0
Tigrigna 10
Turkish 5
Ukrainian 20
Urdu 35
Vietnamese 100
Yiddish 0
Other languages 22 120
Multiple responses 2205
English and French 1920
English and non-official language 140
French and non-official language 115
English; French and non-official language 25
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  #94  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2013, 4:26 PM
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I'm having a hard time getting back to the detailed language results for 2006, but I did see a page that said Moncton CMA had 35 Korean speakers in 2006 (well, 2005 when the census was taken). That would mean we've seen a more than 1500% increase in the number of Korean speakers in the city in just five years.
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  #95  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2013, 4:59 PM
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Numbers are probably low because the majority of the Korean population in Moncton are students/temp residents and likely not citizens, therefore don't fill out census.
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  #96  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2013, 7:39 PM
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I see manufacturing sales have gone up in New Brunswick. June 2012 to June 2013 saw a 8% increase in sales from 1.55 billion to 1.68 billion. Also, from May to June 2013 there was a 1.9 increase in sales from 1.65 billion to 1.68 billion. Seems pretty good. I was shocked to see that Nova Scotia seems to have half the sales numbers of New Brunswick.

Here is the table with more info on the subject above:

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quoti...16a003-eng.htm
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  #97  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2013, 7:59 PM
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Originally Posted by KnoxfordGuy View Post
I was shocked to see that Nova Scotia seems to have half the sales numbers of New Brunswick.
That's because everyone in NS (well, Halifax anyway) works for the government.

NB isn't so fortunate, we have to get our hands dirty in order to make a living here........
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  #98  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2013, 8:28 PM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
That's because everyone in NS (well, Halifax anyway) works for the government.

NB isn't so fortunate, we have to get our hands dirty in order to make a living here........
NB sucks on Ottawa's tit just as hard.
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  #99  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2013, 9:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RyeJay View Post
NB sucks on Ottawa's tit just as hard.
There are a bunch of relevant points here. First off, yes, NB has plenty of government jobs. Moncton has one of the highest concentrations of federal workers in Canada for example, and the biggest employer there, unsurprisingly, is the hospital.

The next point is that government jobs are not necessarily bad or wasteful. If you want to have a good standard of living you need hospitals and universities and some military, and there are public-sector workers in the health care industry that do the same job that private-sector workers would do in the US.

Finally, I would bet that Halifax has more private-sector economic activity than any other town in the region. The banks, insurance companies (Manulife, Admiral Insurance from the UK), aerospace and transportation sector, high-tech companies like RIM, IBM, and Keane employ thousands of people.
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  #100  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2013, 10:18 PM
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It does remain shocking how little manufacturing there is in Nova Scotia, compared to NB. NB has more than double the sales of NS, not what I expected to see. Also I expected that Ontario would have lost much more than they have (according to this).
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