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  #2021  
Old Posted May 21, 2015, 8:09 AM
apetrella802 apetrella802 is offline
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Dc

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Originally Posted by philatonian View Post
I always thought of D.C. as very one-dimensional too. It's an industry town, a lot like an L.A. for government and politics. The one thing Philly and D.C. share is that both cities were designed with a unique purpose. But while William Penn designed Philadelphia as the model American city, D.C. was more ancillary. I don't want to crap on D.C. too much though. I wasn't born there but it definitely raised me. But when it comes to American cities, Philadelphia blends better with the likes of New York, Chicago, and Boston in that it is a very three dimensional place.

I have to admit though, I always cringe a bit when I hear "blue collar" affixed to Philadelphia. Yeah, it certainly has that demographic, but so do a lot of big American cities. I prefer to think of Philadelphia - and the fact that it's retained the economic diversity to be perceived as a "blue collar" town - as a city that hasn't yet lost its soul to brunch restaurants.

I think the only reason Philadelphia isn't held to the same esteem as Chicago or San Francisco is because we're stuck so closely between New York and D.C. I think the national mentality towards Philadelphia is going to change very soon. Comcast and whatever they have planned for the CITC is going to play a big role, but there are a lot of other things happening in tandem, namely the new rules at the convention center.

Couple all of Philadelphia's improvements with our affordability, and the capability of working any corporate job from a laptop, and there is no reason to spend $400,000 on a studio in Columbia Heights or $700,000 on one in Brooklyn. I thiome very wealthy U.S. cities are about to get a harsh slap in the face.
The requirement that buildings in DC not exceed about 10 stories so that the Capital dome is visible from all over town means there is very little opportunity to shape a building to create inspired architecture.

on the side: did you know that about 45% of the art in the National Gallery of Art is from the Widener collection, a Philadelphia industrialist and 45% is from the Mellon collection a Pittsburg banker. So they owe just about all the art in the NGA to Pennsylvania entrepreneurship. Since DC produces nothing but just takes from other productive parts of the economy I guess this is not surprising. It's 4am and I'm having trouble getting to sleep so this came into my head, I don't know why.
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  #2022  
Old Posted May 21, 2015, 10:35 AM
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phoenixboi08 phoenixboi08 is offline
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Originally Posted by apetrella802 View Post
The requirement that buildings in DC not exceed about 10 stories so that the Capital dome is visible from all over town means there is very little opportunity to shape a building to create inspired architecture.
That's an urban myth...

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Originally Posted by apetrella802 View Post
on the side: did you know that about 45% of the art in the National Gallery of Art is from the Widener collection, a Philadelphia industrialist and 45% is from the Mellon collection a Pittsburg banker. So they owe just about all the art in the NGA to Pennsylvania entrepreneurship. Since DC produces nothing but just takes from other productive parts of the economy I guess this is not surprising. It's 4am and I'm having trouble getting to sleep so this came into my head, I don't know why.
Collectors donate to the institutions they enjoy...they could have given it to anyone or created a trust to open a museum in Philadelphia or Pittsburg if they wanted to.

Has nothing to do with "taking."
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  #2023  
Old Posted May 21, 2015, 1:57 PM
Plokoon11 Plokoon11 is online now
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The steel today is really flying up!
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  #2024  
Old Posted May 21, 2015, 2:02 PM
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" BE PATIENT, FORUMERS! " Your crane is coming.... Meanwhile, all of the anticipation over the tower crane's arrival is ' stealing the thunder ' from the building itself.... I've almost forgotten about the tower and started to lust after the, damn, crane.
Ha !! A new phrase for the Urban Dictionary, " Crane Lust". Thanks PEORIA !!
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  #2025  
Old Posted May 21, 2015, 2:31 PM
Larry King Larry King is offline
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Originally Posted by phoenixboi08 View Post
That's an urban myth...



Collectors donate to the institutions they enjoy...they could have given it to anyone or created a trust to open a museum in Philadelphia or Pittsburg if they wanted to.

Has nothing to do with "taking."
urban myth? What's the reason for no tall buildings then?
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  #2026  
Old Posted May 21, 2015, 2:52 PM
jsbrook jsbrook is offline
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urban myth? What's the reason for no tall buildings then?
http://www.welovedc.com/2009/05/19/d...-height-limit/

But still unduly restrictive zoning requirements with no buildings taller than 13 stories in most locations. I understand it in certain historic and monument sections. DC is a unique city and has a special look to it. But this has got to be scrapped outside key zones.
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  #2027  
Old Posted May 21, 2015, 3:38 PM
1487 1487 is offline
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http://www.welovedc.com/2009/05/19/d...-height-limit/

But still unduly restrictive zoning requirements with no buildings taller than 13 stories in most locations. I understand it in certain historic and monument sections. DC is a unique city and has a special look to it. But this has got to be scrapped outside key zones.
very interesting. I never knew the true source of the limitation. There are a ton of cranes up in and around DC- but naturally nothing of any significant height is being built.
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  #2028  
Old Posted May 21, 2015, 9:54 PM
Kidphilly Kidphilly is offline
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urban myth? What's the reason for no tall buildings then?
it actually has to do with the street width I believe by zoning

edit: someone already answered with more detail

are there any limitations in Alexandria, Arlington, Rosslyn (imagine national may restrict here for these first three), SS, Bethesda, Rockville, Tysons, Reston etc?
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  #2029  
Old Posted May 22, 2015, 1:46 AM
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Originally Posted by apetrella802 View Post
The requirement that buildings in DC not exceed about 10 stories so that the Capital dome is visible from all over town means there is very little opportunity to shape a building to create inspired architecture.

on the side: did you know that about 45% of the art in the National Gallery of Art is from the Widener collection, a Philadelphia industrialist and 45% is from the Mellon collection a Pittsburg banker. So they owe just about all the art in the NGA to Pennsylvania entrepreneurship. Since DC produces nothing but just takes from other productive parts of the economy I guess this is not surprising. It's 4am and I'm having trouble getting to sleep so this came into my head, I don't know why.
No one's ever really been able to explain the DC height restrictions to me. I think it has something to do with the ratio between the width of the street and the height of the building, kind of like Manhattan's stepped rule, but much shorter. I know it came to be after the Cairo was built, but I'm not sure it has to do with Capitol sight lines. Someone on a DC thread might be able to explain it.

I never had a problem with DC's lack of skyscrapers when I lived there. What irked me was its layout and lack of a core. It's easy to get around, but there is no Center City or Midtown. It's more like a bunch of Passyunk Squares spread throughout the city.

I'm surprised Arlington's never gotten into the height game. They could certainly afford to and I don't think they have any restrictions. As it is, I think the tallest building in Virginia is in VA beach and it's downright ugly. Being from Virginia it always bugged me that such a wealthy state (at least NOVA and parts of Hampton Rhodes) don't seem to get skyscrapers. All VA ever seems focused on is more roads.

I know I've gotten insanely off topic. Back to the CITC.
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  #2030  
Old Posted May 22, 2015, 2:04 AM
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Nice stories from the VA guys. Hope DCnPhilly is right about Philly's impending explosion of greatness.

Nice to see that this very non-mainstream city appeals deeply to at least some non-natives.

So many outsiders find it so much easier to fall in love with flashier, richer, or more mainstream cities, they just won't give Philly its due.
I don't know I think you're kinda wrong. First off it's already great enough. I don't know what non-mainstream is in regards of a city but I guess that is why the hipsters I know all love Philly and want to move there.

When I lived in Philly I got a sense it was the transplants that truly loved it, or at least more than the natives. Almost a 180 from a place like Boston where the natives seem to be more in love with the city than the transplants.
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  #2031  
Old Posted May 22, 2015, 2:07 AM
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It's funny, I only lived in D.C. proper for three years and I managed to convince at least ten people to move there. Out of 12 years in Philadelphia, only one.
I would imagine that is due to one very important thing: JOBS. Most people I know that moved to Philly was because they liked it. Everyone I know who moved to DC did it for a job.
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  #2032  
Old Posted May 22, 2015, 2:56 AM
VTinPhilly VTinPhilly is offline
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Originally Posted by Kidphilly View Post
it actually has to do with the street width I believe by zoning

edit: someone already answered with more detail

are there any limitations in Alexandria, Arlington, Rosslyn (imagine national may restrict here for these first three), SS, Bethesda, Rockville, Tysons, Reston etc?
The Height of Buildings Act of 1910 (an Act of the U.S. Congress) places restrictions on the height of buildings in the District of Columbia. Buildings are limited to a height of 130' or the width of the right-of-way of the street on which the building fronts, whichever is shorter. Buildings on the north side of a select portion of Pennsylvania Ave. can go up to 160 feet. There is a height limit of 90' on residential streets. Some exceptions have been allowed as there is now a commercial building facing Franklin Sq. that rises to (I believe) 210 feet.

The adjacent counties in Virginia and Maryland set their own height restrictions free from Congressional control. When I lived in Washington, I remember a very heated debate between the Feds and Arlington County regarding the height of new buildings which began popping up on top of what is known as the "Arlington Ridge". This Ridge rises above the Potomac River on the Virginia side and is clearly visible behind the Lincoln Memorial. Tall buildings on top of that Ridge adversely impact views of the Lincoln Memorial especially as seen from the west terrace of the Capitol. A little farther to the west in Rosslyn, some buildings being constructed (Arlen Towers) exceeded 300' in height. As I recall, the Feds and Arlington finally reached an agreement to limit buildings to 300 feet in the Rosslyn area.
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  #2033  
Old Posted May 22, 2015, 4:23 AM
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I'm surprised Arlington's never gotten into the height game. They could certainly afford to and I don't think they have any restrictions. As it is, I think the tallest building in Virginia is in VA beach and it's downright ugly. Being from Virginia it always bugged me that such a wealthy state (at least NOVA and parts of Hampton Rhodes) don't seem to get skyscrapers. All VA ever seems focused on is more roads.
the tallest building in Virginia is Westin Virginia Beach Town Center http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Westin_...ch_Town_Center idk about Virginia but some areas like Montgomery county Maryland have height restrictions like Bethesda is like 150 and where most of the somewhat tall buildings are is in Rockville which gets to 300.
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  #2034  
Old Posted May 22, 2015, 4:41 PM
apetrella802 apetrella802 is offline
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Philadelphia 3 cities in one

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Originally Posted by relnahe View Post
I don't know I think you're kinda wrong. First off it's already great enough. I don't know what non-mainstream is in regards of a city but I guess that is why the hipsters I know all love Philly and want to move there.

When I lived in Philly I got a sense it was the transplants that truly loved it, or at least more than the natives. Almost a 180 from a place like Boston where the natives seem to be more in love with the city than the transplants.
How many cities in the US can say they have the following:

1) an intact 18th early 19th century cityscape, i.e., society hill(over 4,000 18th
century buildings, Old City retains many commercial buildings from the decades before the Civil War.

Call this the Walking/Mechantile city

2) A street car industrial city from say 1850 to 1929. The residential rows West of Broad and South of Market st like Delancy, Spruce, Pine. Walking in this area is a 19th c. counterpoint to the 18th c, streets of Society Hill and most of West Philadelphia also reflects this period.

3) The automobile, Service and Technology based city say from the second half of the 20th c to the present. All of the Penn Center office development after WWII and the medical complex at Penn reflect this period. The buildings at the 30th st station area tap into a much greater potential economic base in that they straddle the Northeast train corridor. In the 1920s when office towers were built along S. Broad and West Walnut and Chestnut sts there was no relationship to highway access. Today the Comcast Towers and others are built near access to the Vine st expressway, I76, I95. They have a double advantage since they also have easy access to suburban and long distance trains.
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  #2035  
Old Posted May 22, 2015, 5:53 PM
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From a moment ago. Photos don't do it justice.





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  #2036  
Old Posted May 22, 2015, 7:28 PM
apetrella802 apetrella802 is offline
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The AIA Center for Architecture, 1218 Arch St will have a very elaborate display, including models, etc. on the New CITC tower. This display was overseen by Sir Norman Foster and should be well worth a visit(it's free). If you call the office next week they can tell you when it goes on display, certainly within the next two weeks 215 569 3186
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  #2037  
Old Posted May 22, 2015, 7:39 PM
apetrella802 apetrella802 is offline
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Forgot to mention the L. Kahn lecture on June 9th at the Harrison auditorium U of P will be given by Sir Norman Foster the architect of CITC. If you want to go get tickets at

http://www.philadelphiacfa.org/event...-norman-foster
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  #2038  
Old Posted May 22, 2015, 7:47 PM
apetrella802 apetrella802 is offline
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The CITC exhibition opens Friday May 31st.
http://www.philadelphiacfa.org/event...ng-our-skyline
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  #2039  
Old Posted May 22, 2015, 7:55 PM
Plokoon11 Plokoon11 is online now
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I wonder if your allowed to take pictures?
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  #2040  
Old Posted May 22, 2015, 8:10 PM
apetrella802 apetrella802 is offline
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picture

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I wonder if your allowed to take pictures?
yes you can take pictures
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