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  #141  
Old Posted Mar 31, 2009, 3:19 PM
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Nice stuff there..
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  #142  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2009, 1:52 PM
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Louisiana ranked among the fastest-growing states for high-tech employment

The Times-Picayune
March 31, 2009

Louisiana now ranks among the 10 fastest-growing states for high-tech employment, a technology study released today shows.

The state gained 4,349 high-tech jobs between 2002 and 2007, an increase of more than 11 percent, according to the Baton Rouge Business Report. Louisiana ranks 10th in the nation for the total number of tech jobs gained and seventh for its percentage growth.
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  #143  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2009, 2:08 PM
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Airport plan has May 1 deadline

By WILL SENTELL
Advocate Capitol News Bureau
Apr 2, 2009

State leaders plan to decide by May 1 whether to continue efforts to build a $4.4 billion airport near Donaldsonville.

The issue is in the final stages of a review by the state Department of Economic Development.

The report was ordered, with a May 1 deadline, by the Legislature last year amid criticism the state has spent too much money on a 17-year project that has failed to attract private investors.

“We will make the deadline,” state Economic Development Secretary Stephen Moret said Wednesday.

If state officials decide the airport makes sense, the Louisiana Airport Authority — which has led the push — will continue operations. If not, the agency would be abolished by July 1.

Backers envision an airport with links to water, rail and highways.

It would be built on a 25,000-acre site that would cover parts of Iberville, Ascension and Assumption parishes.

Supporters contend the airport, called the Louisiana Transportation Center, would be the biggest economic development project in state history.

Critics argue the proposal is unrealistic and note the state has already spent $7 million for studies, operating costs and other expenses without making any final decisions.

The state economic development department is working with SNC-Lavalin, an engineering and construction firm, to help settle the issue.

SNC-Lavalin is supposed to find out whether there are private investors willing to commit enough jobs, payroll and lease payments to justify state aid.

“We have to ensure that we have sufficient private-sector commitments to justify that,” Moret said of major state financial involvement.

Exactly how much taxpayer assistance would be needed to make the airport a reality is unclear. In the past, backers have said it would take $350 million or more.

The sudden downturn in the Louisiana’s financial outlook is another issue. There’s $1.3 billion less in state revenue available for services in the state financial year that begins July 1.

LAA officials referred questions on the airport to state economic development leaders.
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  #144  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2009, 1:25 AM
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Perkins Rowe hotel planned



Perkins Rowe developer JTS Interests announced Tuesday that a five-story, 165-room hotel there will be flagged by Hilton Garden Inn.

JTS also said construction will begin next year on the second phase of development — 750,000 square feet of office, retail and residential space at the mixed-use project at Perkins Road and Bluebonnet Boulevard.

The 130,000-square-foot hotel is one of the last major components of Perkins Rowe’s initial phase of about 1 million square feet. It will be built behind Orvis, the outdoor apparel store, just off Bluebonnet. JTS said completion is expected in 2010.

# By CHRIS GAUTREAU
# Advocate business writer
# Published: Apr 15, 2009

rendering and story courtesy of The Advocate
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  #145  
Old Posted Apr 23, 2009, 1:10 PM
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Alternative energy ideas brewing at LSU conference

Posted by Rebecca Mowbray,
The Times-Picayune
April 22,

BATON ROUGE -- As Congress contemplates requiring utilities to generate or purchase a certain amount of power from renewable sources, using dead plants as fuel may be one of the most logical starting points for Louisiana, speakers at Louisiana State University's annual alternative energy conference said today.

Twenty-eight states already have renewable portfolio standards, but none of them are in the Southeast, where the sun isn't as abundant as in some other parts of the country and the onshore wind isn't as strong. Bills pending in Congress such as the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 could force Louisiana and its neighbors to act.

As Congress was debating the initial draft of the climate change legislation this week, dozens of entrepreneurs, financiers, utility executives, environmental advocates and state agencies gathered today, on Earth Day, to hear the latest at the LSU Center for Energy Studies' Alternative Energy 2009 conference.

Jeremiah Haswell, a research engineer at the Southern Co., a regional utility serving parts of Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and Florida, said his company is focusing on biomass because it's currently the only large-scale renewable power source that's economically feasible in the region.

"We know an RPS is coming, biomass is our most economic option at this point," Haswell said. "It boils down to what is the cheapest route of supply."

The Southern Co. has been making wood chips out of dead trees and mixing it in with coal at one of its plants, and is converting another plant to run entirely on biomass by June 2012. But it's not as simple as it sounds.

There are logistical challenges, such as setting up systems to allow 160 trucks to deliver wood chips each day, and economic problems once a new fuel source comes into favor. The Southern Co. realized that if it tried to meet its renewable power needs with wood chips, the price of wood chips would rise with demand, rendering biomass power production unaffordable, and driving the region's pulp and paper industry out of business.

Another speaker, Kelly Tiller, said that the University of Tennessee ran into a similar problem in ramping up a five-year $70 million state pilot program to farm a hardy form of grass called switchgrass and turn it into ethanol for transportation.

Seeds cost $6 a pound when the project was being planned. They jumped to $20 a pound as soon as it was announced and rose to $30 a pound, making the project more expensive. Tiller said that the research company created to carry out the pilot project managed to lock in prices at $20 a pound, and considered it an important lesson in the economics of bio-fuels.

David Dismukes, who ran today's program as assistant director of the LSU Center for Energy Studies, said that competition for biomass sources, the impact it could have on other industries or food sources, and land use questions mean that biomass cannot be the only answer.

To make progress on viable renewable power sources, Louisiana needs to make investments the way the state of Tennessee has done in Tiller's project to begin learning what works and what doesn't.

"We can't just sit around and say, 'Oh, we've got a lot of opportunities.' We've got to start testing them out," Dismukes said.

If Louisiana doesn't start trying things, local utilities will probably end up buying renewable power or credits from states that have invested in it, leading to a outflow of money from the state.

"If the state wants to develop homegrown renewable energy, it isn't going to come for free," Dismukes said. "If we don't make investments, we'll probably export lots of dollars."

Dismukes believes that geothermal power, or capturing heat energy trapped inside the earth to turn a turbine and generate electricity, will be promising in Louisiana. Oil and gas exploration has often turned up thermal energy deposits, and the state has the technical expertise with drilling and a blueprint for a regulatory structure to handle such finds.

Paul Thomsen, director for policy and business development at the Nevada geothermal company Ormat Technologies, also said that geothermal is promising for Louisiana because of the state's geology. The main problem with geothermal power, he said, is that it's impossible to know whether heat sources will last for two years or twenty, and bankers don't want to take the risk that sources could run out quickly.

Thomsen also said that Louisiana should try to convince Congress that trapping the heat released from pipelines and using it to generate electricity should be considered a renewable fuel source rather than an energy efficiency to help states meet any future renewable portfolio requirements.

Another speaker, Deborah Deal Blackwell, said that her company, Hyperion Power Generation Inc., is commercializing a technology from Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico that will allow tiny nuclear power plants buried under ground to power the equivalent of roughly 25,000 homes.

Nuclear is necessary to meet the nation's power needs, she said, but the problem is that plants cost billions and it will be 12 years before the ones under consideration now are operational. Her company's mini-nuclear plants will cost about $25 million apiece and will be available for deployment in 2013.

"This type of producer would be a lot more affordable and economical" than large scale nuclear, she said.
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  #146  
Old Posted May 11, 2009, 2:00 PM
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Global shipping firm sets up in BRBy CHRIS GAUTREAU
Advocate business writer
Published: May 10, 2009



For American audiences, the Dutch name Mammoet Transport might not roll off the tongue, but it’s been music to the ears of the Port of Greater Baton Rouge.

In late December, the global maritime and shipping firm opened a branch with a handful of employees at the port’s Inland Rivers Marine Terminal on North Line Road in Port Allen in what was built originally as a maintenance building.

With the staff now at 15 and climbing, branch manager Doug Lowe has already trucked in a double-wide trailer for more office space. Preliminary plans are in the works for construction of an office building.

“Our plan is to develop over the next two years and grow into a permanent facility to hold up to 40 people,” Lowe said.

In the coming months, Mammoet will be searching for engineers and project managers, among other professionals. The timing couldn’t be better as south Louisiana tries to stave off the brunt of the nation’s deepest economic recession since World War II.

Mammoet (pronounced ma-moot) is the Dutch word for mammoth, the corporate logo and an apt description of the company’s specialty of moving some of the world’s largest cargo.

One of its clients, for example, built a desalination plant in Saudi Arabia. Mammoet’s job was moving in 14 giant evaporators, each one weighing more than 1,500 tons, from the fabrication site across the Persian Gulf in the United Arab Emirates.

The local office, a branch of Mammoet’s regional headquarters in Rosharon, Texas, south of Houston, offers the company’s full array of services. Much of the work so far has been loading large equipment on and off barges floated in on the terminal canal that connects with the Intracoastal Waterway.

The maintenance area of the current office doubles as a storage area.

“To find a tenant like this complements our infrastructure, and it bring jobs. It’s not just some relocation,” said Jay Hardman, the port’s executive director.

Hardman said Mammoet, which did not seek tax breaks in opening the new branch, also brings with it new opportunities for the local petrochemical sector.

Hardman recalled how a local plant manager told him recently of replacing a large vessel at his facility. Despite meticulous planning, the entire operation hinged on whether the barge transporting the vessel upriver would arrive on time. Fortunately it did, Hardman said, but the wait was a nervous one.

Mammoet’s staging services offer plants more flexibility, Hardman said, by giving them a nearby area for assembling and storing large pieces of equipment.

Lowe said that while New Orleans was in competition for the new branch, the Baton Rouge port was a virtual lock because of its facilities and access to rail and Interstate 10.

“The thing I think that really got them was the ability to get some of this equipment onto and off of barges, and move this equipment around,” Hardman said. “With the access and the proximity to the Intracoastal Waterway, it just all fell into place.”

Privately held and based near Rotterdam in The Netherlands, Mammoet is a global player in heavy lifting and transportation via water, rail and truck and mobile crane rentals and sales, with clients mainly in the petrochemical, civil engineering and energy sectors.

Its corporate roots trace as far back as the early 19th century. But in its present form, the company began with the merger of three family-owned Netherlands transport companies in the early 1970s.

Through a series of mergers and acquisitions over the decades, the company now has operations on six continents with a reported 3,200 employees worldwide — 400 in the United States. According to a British news report earlier this year, the company has annual revenue of about $945 million.

In addition to its cargo handling, Mammoet is known for designing and engineering customized equipment, like the self-propelled modular transporter known by its acronym, SPMT. Essentially a remote-controlled trailer, the SPMT has 12 independently controlled wheels that make the devices highly maneuverable for their size.

Using a team of SPMTs, the company record for heaviest move was set last year in Oman, where Mammoet moved a gargantuan metal tube known as a xylene column a distance of 2‰ miles. The column stretched for 100 meters — the length of a football field and one end zone — and topped the scales at 1,605 tons — 3.3 million pounds.

Moreover, Mammoet offers salvage and removal services for shipwrecks and damaged offshore platforms.

The company entered the media spotlight in late 2001, when it took on the somber task of recovering the Russian submarine “Kursk.”

In August 2000, a torpedo aboard the Kursk exploded, leaving it crippled at the bottom of the frigid Barents Sea. The entire crew died before rescuers could reach them.

Mammoet formed a consortium with Smit International, another Dutch maritime company. Together, the companies lifted the submarine and hauled it back to Russia.

Based in Rosharon, Texas, Jan Kleyn now serves as chief operating officer of Mammoet USA. But as a project engineer eight years ago, Kleyn oversaw all fabrication work for the Kursk salvage operation.

In Port Allen last week for the local branch’s ceremonial opening, Kleyn said the Kursk was his last project.

“I said I’m not going to do any more projects. Nothing could ever compare to that one,” Kleyn said.

Closer to home, Mammoet has been hired to lift into place completed sections of the new Huey P. Long bridge in New Orleans. The operation, Lowe said, allows crews to more-safely build bridge sections on the ground.

Last year, the company also transported a reactor vessel — a mere 500 tons — to the ExxonMobil refinery in Chalmette.

Hardman said it’s still early, but other local companies already have begun inquiring about Mammoet’s services.

“We got a prospective tenant that met with Mammoet, trying to conceptualize the layout and the ability for a joint venture on some lift capabilities,” he said. “The synergy starts to build.”
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  #147  
Old Posted May 13, 2009, 2:03 PM
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Upscale downtown eatery in works

By CHAD CALDER
Advocate business writer
Published: May 13, 2009



Scott Varnadoe, the chef at the former Bluff’s restaurant and the kitchen at the Myrtles plantation will open Varnadoe’s at Kress at Third & Main in the fall.

The restaurant and another eatery called 1887 Bistro were announced for the development Tuesday at the monthly meeting of the Downtown Development District.

Varnadoe described the restaurant as “upscale down South,” saying “you might see okra, black-eyed peas and foie gras on the same plate.”

He said it will be white tablecloth but with a casual atmosphere common in Southern upscale restaurants.

It will include an open kitchen, outdoor seating and a seafood display case. The restaurant will also serve brunch on Sundays.

1887 Bistro will be run separately and will transition from bakery items at breakfast to lunch to dinner to tapas and then a bar at night, said John Schneider, who is developing Kress with his business partner Brace Godfrey. The two are partners in Cyntreniks Group.

Godfrey and Schneider cut the ribbon on the $18 million redevelopment of the Kress/Knox/Welsh & Levy buildings in October.

The bistro got its name from the date the Knox building, the oldest of the development’s three original buildings, was built.

Schneider said additional retail development is still in the works, and he still expects to sign men’s and women’s clothing retailers.

Twelve of the 16 apartment units and one of the three condo units have been leased. There will also be an announcement soon about who will take up the 12,000 square feet of office space there. Schneider said he and Godfrey expect to have the entire project leased by Sept. 1.

The project will include a memorial to the 1960 lunch counter sit-in by seven black students who demanded service, were arrested and suspended from Southern University, but who helped spur the civil rights movement.

Godfrey also said work could begin on Cyntreniks’ other downtown project, the 93-room Hotel King on Lafayette Street, as soon as June and it could be open by fall 2010.
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  #148  
Old Posted May 17, 2009, 11:13 AM
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Pinnacle Casino Rivierre ~ Baton Rouge



More than a year after receiving approval from voters, Pinnacle Entertainment is moving ahead to get zoning for its south Baton Rouge casino.

The casino is part of Pinnacle’s proposed mixed-use development near the intersection of Gardere Lane and River Road that is scheduled to go before the city-parish Planning Commission at 5 p.m. Monday in the Metro Council Chambers at 222 St. Louis St.

Pinnacle’s proposed casino would be part of a massive 577-acre tract in south Baton Rouge that eventually would include a golf course, an equestrian center, a 14.6-acre central park, 430 single-family homes, 240 condominiums or apartments, 137,500 square feet of retail space, 137,500 square feet of office space, two 100-room hotels and a 160,000- square-foot casino and entertainment complex.


http://www.2theadvocate.com/news/45231702.html

Last edited by fla_tiger; May 17, 2009 at 1:04 PM.
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  #149  
Old Posted Jun 13, 2009, 12:51 AM
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Capitol Lofts/Spanishtown





A proposed 115-unit apartment development overlooking Arsenal Park has drawn fire from the Historic Spanish Town Civic Association, which says the building’s 160 tenants would be too many for the neighborhood’s narrow streets and quiet character.

David Slaughter, who plans to build Capitol Lofts on land owned by Richard Preis and Chuck Cline, told the Downtown Development District on Tuesday that Capitol Lofts would have 10 walk-up lofts on a two-story portion on North Seventh Street and 50 one-bedroom flats and 55 two-bedroom units on a six-story portion overlooking Arsenal Park on State Capitol Drive and wrapping around on North Sixth Street. The first level of this portion would be covered parking.

link----http://www.2theadvocate.com/news/47486192.html?index=1&c=y
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  #150  
Old Posted Jun 27, 2009, 1:43 PM
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Maritime Security Operations Ctr/Westport



The Port of Greater Baton Rouge’s board voted Thursday to give the port director authority to solicit bids on its planned Maritime Security Operations Center.

The three-story emergency command center will be an assembly point for command-and-control operations of various state, federal and local agencies involved in maritime emergency situations. It will also serve as dispatch facilities for all West Baton Rouge Parish firefighter and law enforcement agencies.

http://www.2theadvocate.com/news/business/49282532.html
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  #151  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2009, 1:09 AM
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Hotel Indigo Baton Rouge


rendering courtesy Robert Coleman Architects

The former Hotel King now being redeveloped across from the downtown Hilton will be a Hotel Indigo.

Hotel Indigo is Intercontinental’s boutique hotel brand.

Brace Godfrey, who is redeveloping the old hotel with business partner John Schneider, said the eight-story, 93-room hotel is still slated to open in September 2010.



former Hotel King under renovation



future Hotel Indigo is to bottom left as seen from Hilton's Heidelberg balcony.

http://www.2theadvocate.com/news/business/50779542.html
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  #152  
Old Posted Jul 15, 2009, 11:12 PM
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Saw this on the news... how many rooms will be downtown after the Indigo's opening? Anyone know?
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  #153  
Old Posted Jul 16, 2009, 3:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthSky View Post
Saw this on the news... how many rooms will be downtown after the Indigo's opening? Anyone know?
the hotel indigo will be 93 rooms
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  #154  
Old Posted Jul 16, 2009, 3:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckett5425 View Post
the hotel indigo will be 93 rooms
No, how many total hotel rooms will be downtown?
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  #155  
Old Posted Jul 16, 2009, 3:49 AM
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Sorry, my brain was turned off while i was reading that. Its a total of 683 rooms. 290 at the hilton, 300 at the sheraton, and a proposed 93 at the indigo.
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  #156  
Old Posted Jul 20, 2009, 1:33 AM
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Thanks (not) to the Spanishtown neighborhood "activists" the "redesign" for the Capitol Lofts apartment project has 
been scaled back to 67 units in a
 four-story building. Remember, the original design was 115 units in a six-story building. Neighboring Capitol Park has multiple structures ranging from a minimum of 12 floors to the Capitol itself at 34 floors, of course the state is "exempt" from restrictions that may be imposed on size of buildings and opinions of the NIMBY's.



Although the developer agreed and downsized , this is still getting complaints from the "historians" that it remains "too big & bulky".
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  #157  
Old Posted Aug 4, 2009, 6:18 AM
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Not so much Baton Rouge, but it is a big project and it's directly between BR and NO.

Link here

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  #158  
Old Posted Aug 4, 2009, 2:40 PM
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Wow, some competition.... Guess Louisiana could not let it go!
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  #159  
Old Posted Aug 5, 2009, 11:30 PM
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The glass facade nearly complete at the new Courthouse

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  #160  
Old Posted Aug 14, 2009, 12:48 AM
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Audubon Alive!


Talking about a ride that would simulate flying along the Mississippi River, Tom Hennes, of Thinc Design, discusses the proposed $225 million Alive destination attraction park that is part of the $887 million bond issue the Metro Council will decide tonight whether to put on the Nov. 14 ballot.


map showing location of Audubon Alive! attraction along the Mississippi at DeSoto Park opposite the Capitol park complex.
photo & map courtesy 2theAdvocate.

Audubon Alive! has been touted as the economic driver for Mayor Kip Holden’s $887.5 million bond issue, but faces opposition from community members that don’t rank downtown development high among the city’s priorities. Holden’s administration says that the $225 million project will create up to 23,000 permanent jobs in 11 years and help pay off the bond issue in 17 years instead of 30.

link to story in BR Advocate:http://www.2theadvocate.com/news/53006402.html

Link to video Audubon site:http://www.progressis.org/home.php

Audubon Alive, slated for completion in 2012, will offer four venues: Earth, Wind, Fire and Water. Among the attractions:

· Animal Adventures, with tigers, jaguars, monkeys, butterflies and extensive waterfalls;

· Beyond Turtle Reef, featuring live experiences with sea creatures;

· Soaring, an interactive experience with a 270-degree Imax-like view in a glider simulation;

· Predator, a fast-paced adventure where participants wind through the jungle with audio and video projections;

· Stormy Weather, an interactive theater providing experiences of hurricanes and global-warming issues in the setting of the wetlands;

· Swamp Tales, an indoor walk-through swamp with a 15,000-gallon water tank and interactive theater;

· Rhythms & Blues, a 900-seat theater with cultural performance live shows.
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