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  #13761  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2018, 7:41 PM
Will O' Wisp Will O' Wisp is offline
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Originally Posted by Streamliner View Post
I know it's kind of tongue-in-cheek, but I appreciate this.
Infrastructure projects can often be larger and more impactful than skyscrapers, although I must say tend to be less pretty to look at. I'll expand on each to give a little context.

>Lindbergh dropped AECOM for the Terminal 1 redesign and is now going with Jacobs.
The airport authority is a pretty harsh taskmaster by most accounts, they pay out well but they expect the world from their developers. From what I've heard AECOM couldn't keep up with the numerous improvements they requested to the design, and Jacobs showed themselves well during the design/build of the new customs facility. One thing's for certain, the new terminal will set a new standard for customer experience and environmental stewardship if the authority gets its way.

>The Brown Field MAP project is going to present at the Smart Growth Committee on the 27th, the last stop on the way to City Council
After 12 years it's finally happening, the development that will utterly change the Otay Mesa region and potentially all air cargo in SD. After a CEQA odyssey nearly as bad as the Manchester Pacific Gateway and holdups waiting for the road infrastructure to be built out, by December construction should be underway (or the whole thing will dissolve in a mess of lawsuits).

>Miramar started construction on the new faculties for the F-35, mainly on the NE corner of the ramp.
With the basing of roughly a quarter of the Marines' F-35 fleet and potentially a new marine training squadron too, this multi-billion dollar project will ensure a continued military presence in SD for the foreseeable future. And it'll open just in time for the new Top Gun movie!

> McClellan-Palomar released an addendum to their EIR showing that moving the approach lighting won't negatively impact any biological resources.
That was pretty much the last step in ensuring the runway extension will pass its EIR, eventually. Sure, they'll probably be a few CEQA lawsuits, but in 20 years a flying from Carlsbad to domestic locations in the US will be a fairly routine thing.


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Originally Posted by Nv_2897 View Post


WOW what a nice design! Im surprised its not shorter due to Little Italy being so close to Lindberg Field
You'd be surprised how small the FAA imaginary surfaces are, they more or less only apply to Little Italy and Banker's Hill in the downtown area. If it weren't for the 1.5 mile 500' limit, most of downtown wouldn't have any height restrictions.
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  #13762  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2018, 10:44 PM
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Could downtown's building boom be coming to an end?
San Diego Union-Tribune
September 14, 2018
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Costs for construction materials used in San Diego’s newest buildings are rising fast, and some in the industry say it might slow the building boom that has altered downtown’s skyline since the end of the recession.

Slowed rent growth and increased labor costs are also seen as problems for the building industry.

The price of steel — crucial for residential skyscrapers and high-tech office buildings — has risen dramatically since the Trump administration announced tariffs in March on nations importing to the United States.

The benchmark price for steel this week was up 31 percent from the beginning of the year, said commodities tracker S&P Global Platts. Prices for aluminum also shot up when tariffs were announced but have stabilized to about where they were at the start of the year.

There are enough major building projects ongoing, especially downtown, that it might be a while before anyone notices a slowdown in construction. Companies like Canadian-based Bosa Development have no option but to continue construction on major projects, such as its planned tower off Broadway that will be the tallest residential building in San Diego County’s history.

“It’s ridiculous,” said Nat Bosa, president of the company, said of steel price increases. “It’s costing us a few million bucks more.”
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  #13763  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2018, 10:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Will O' Wisp View Post
Infrastructure projects can often be larger and more impactful than skyscrapers, although I must say tend to be less pretty to look at. I'll expand on each to give a little context.
Thanks for that! I worked on a small piece of one of these projects, so it's nice to see things chugging along. I really should follow up on these more. Where do you go to keep up with this news?
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  #13764  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2018, 2:13 PM
Will O' Wisp Will O' Wisp is offline
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Originally Posted by Streamliner View Post
Thanks for that! I worked on a small piece of one of these projects, so it's nice to see things chugging along. I really should follow up on these more. Where do you go to keep up with this news?
Haha, there's a distinct possibility we've met before then

Wish I had a more formal answer, but most of it's just straight up old school office gossip plus having enough friends and colleagues in the industry that most news filters my way eventually. Since you're already in the industry, try asking your coworkers and supervisors about projects they know about. You'd be surprised how small SD can seem, there's a pretty good chance somebody knows somebody and you'll get another small bit of info.
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  #13765  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2018, 10:27 PM
Will O' Wisp Will O' Wisp is offline
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Originally Posted by Streamliner View Post
Could downtown's building boom be coming to an end?
San Diego Union-Tribune
September 14, 2018
Link to Article
Say it isn't so....

Last edited by Will O' Wisp; Sep 17, 2018 at 1:16 AM.
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  #13766  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2018, 8:11 PM
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I read that article and I just think that was Phillip Molnar needing to pump out content. "Look guys tons of cranes on horizon, but will it stop??" So many people who live in SD county never even go near downtown so he is probably just updating them that new highrises are coming downtown lol.

Why would Trump kill the construction/infrastructure industry just to make tiny coal/steel industy's happy?? Makes no sense especially because he is a developer. Total jobs related to construction is probably 20 times that of coal and steel combined. Hopefully this trade war tariff stuff ends soon and steel prices normalize.
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  #13767  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2018, 9:37 PM
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Originally Posted by mello View Post
I read that article and I just think that was Phillip Molnar needing to pump out content. "Look guys tons of cranes on horizon, but will it stop??" So many people who live in SD county never even go near downtown so he is probably just updating them that new highrises are coming downtown lol.

Why would Trump kill the construction/infrastructure industry just to make tiny coal/steel industy's happy?? Makes no sense especially because he is a developer. Total jobs related to construction is probably 20 times that of coal and steel combined. Hopefully this trade war tariff stuff ends soon and steel prices normalize.
Agree. Someone needed to write an article and what better to do than bash the President.

Short term steel increases are a small price to pay for correcting a decades long trade imbalance.
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  #13768  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2018, 1:41 AM
Will O' Wisp Will O' Wisp is offline
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Originally Posted by mello View Post
Why would Trump kill the construction/infrastructure industry just to make tiny coal/steel industy's happy?? Makes no sense especially because he is a developer. Total jobs related to construction is probably 20 times that of coal and steel combined.
Because he's an idiot

The idea is that by temporarily implementing tariffs on you'll force companies to invest in manufacturing infrastructure stateside, which will make manufacturing cheaper in the US when the tariffs are removed. Which might be a good idea, if labor wasn't the primary cost of production, if the US economy based on importing physical goods and exporting non-tangible services, and if all the manufacturing companies didn't know that Trump is going to bow to political pressure eventually. So for now the maim effect has been to force American to buy higher priced goods from overseas.
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  #13769  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2018, 2:39 AM
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Originally Posted by spoonman View Post
Agree. Someone needed to write an article and what better to do than bash the President.

Short term steel increases are a small price to pay for correcting a decades long trade imbalance.
Please stick with discussing development because you have the economics completely wrong. This completely unnecessary steel tariffs are raising the prices of raw materials, leading to adverse impacts for users of raw materials. Whirlpool, stock declined 15% in one day earlier this summer as a direct result of Trump’s tariffs. So much winning!

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/07/24/whir...eel-costs.html

Trump’s completely unnecessary trade war has also created a crisis for America’s agricultural sector, which has been our second or third largest export. In fact, Trump gave a $12B bailout to these freeloading farmers.
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  #13770  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2018, 3:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Will O' Wisp View Post
Because he's an idiot

The idea is that by temporarily implementing tariffs on you'll force companies to invest in manufacturing infrastructure stateside, which will make manufacturing cheaper in the US when the tariffs are removed. Which might be a good idea, if labor wasn't the primary cost of production, if the US economy based on importing physical goods and exporting non-tangible services, and if all the manufacturing companies didn't know that Trump is going to bow to political pressure eventually. So for now the maim effect has been to force American to buy higher priced goods from overseas.
The primary reason for tariffs is to pressure China and other countries to renegotiate better trade agreements, with the goal of reducing trade barriers (import tariffs) for US goods into these countries. This pressure is already forcing Canada and Mexico back to the table regarding NAFTA.

Last edited by spoonman; Sep 18, 2018 at 3:21 AM.
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  #13771  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2018, 3:06 AM
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Originally Posted by 202_Cyclist View Post
Please stick with discussing development because you have the economics completely wrong. This completely unnecessary steel tariffs are raising the prices of raw materials, leading to adverse impacts for users of raw materials. Whirlpool, stock declined 15% in one day earlier this summer as a direct result of Trump’s tariffs. So much winning!

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/07/24/whir...eel-costs.html

Trump’s completely unnecessary trade war has also created a crisis for America’s agricultural sector, which has been our second or third largest export. In fact, Trump gave a $12B bailout to these freeloading farmers.
Judging by all the crap in your signature, you probably can’t be reasoned with, but correcting trillion dollar annual trade deficits are more important than short term stock changes. If stocks are your focus I guess you can thank the president for the tremendous growth in the market (I’m sure you are big enough to give credit since you can give criticism...you probably can’t though).

Surely you can realize that the tariffs are a strategy to renegotiate trade agreements. That is obvious. If you are not in favor of that, please share your ideas on how to renegotiate trade rules between the US and China.
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  #13772  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2018, 4:51 AM
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While I'm more than willing to gum up the thread with SD region airports, when we're getting random people jumping in to make political posts I think the expiration date on the discussion has passed. Suffice to say, there are some difficulties in the current economic environment and hopefully SD can work past them.

Back to our regularly scheduled programing...

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San Diego approves plan to improve sports arena area with housing, parks, bay-to-bay trail
http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/...917-story.html

Hundreds of acres surrounding San Diego’s aging sports arena would slowly be transformed into dense housing, modern commercial projects, 30 acres of parks and a bay-to-bay trail under a plan the City Council approved on Monday.

The plan is to make the community more resident-friendly and less industrial by chopping up its oversized blocks with new, smaller streets featuring bike lanes and pedestrian-friendly plazas.

The population of the area, known as the Midway District, would rise from 4,600 to 27,000 because land with large commercial projects would be re-zoned for housing, spiking the number of units from just under 2,000 to more than 11,000.

The 52-year-old arena could remain as it is, be replaced by mixed-use development or be replaced by a more modern arena, although any new structure higher than 30 feet would require voter approval in a referendum.

While the new plan would increase traffic in the area, it would only be about 1 percent more congested than under a 1991 development blueprint for the area that is being replaced by the plan approved on Monday, officials said. That’s primarily because many of the area’s commercial projects bring more regional traffic into the area than the housing that would replace them under the new blueprint, which is called a community plan update.


Congestion would also be eased by dozens of road upgrades, including new freeway onramps and greater use by residents of the nearby Old Town Trolley station and some rapid bus routes.

In addition, the plan includes a bay-to-bay trail for bicyclists and pedestrians, which would connect San Diego Bay at Laurel Street to Mission Bay at the San Diego River and Interstate 8.

“This will set the stage for the type of development we want to see in the Midway area, like more housing and jobs for residents and a revitalized entertainment district that all San Diegans can enjoy,” Mayor Kevin Faulconer said in a news release. “We’re doubling down on our strategy of focusing new development around transit and job centers as we rebuild our city for the future.”

Critics said the plan should include more subsidized housing for low-income residents and should do more to help San Diego achieve its climate action goals of having more people commute by mass transit, biking and walking.

Some council members said those criticisms have merit, but the council still approved the plan unanimously after a two-hour public hearing at City Hall.

Councilwoman Lorie Zapf of Bay Ho, whose district includes the 1,324 acres affected by the plan, said it would dramatically upgrade the character and ambience of the area.

"It's been an embarrassment because it's been so blighted," she said. "With this new plan, we can say goodbye to the red light district of yesteryear and welcome in a new era of better transportation, more housing options, park and recreation facilities and a fantastic balance of mixed-use properties."

The plan was also praised by several private property owners in the area, the San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce, the San Diego Unified Port District and leaders from nearby U.S. Navy facilities.

"In addition to expanding housing opportunities with shorter commutes for Navy personnel throughout the San Diego area, this plan's timing couldn't be better," said Capt. Brien Dickson, commanding officer of Navy Base Point Loma.

Navy officials plan to redevelop their Old Town complex and SPAWAR, two large properties along Pacific Highway in the Midway District, which is bordered by San Diego International Airport, Interstate 5, Interstate 8, Laurel Street and the eastern edge of Point Loma.

"The Navy will strive to ensure our land use and development stays consistent with this plan and compatible with the surrounding community development as it continues to improve," Dicksen told the council.

Some critics said the zoning in the plan should require developers to make a significant portion of the housing units, perhaps 20 percent, subsidized for residents who meet income restrictions.

Mike Hansen, the city’s planning director, said officials prefer to make such requirements citywide instead of neighborhood by neighborhood.

He said an “inclusionary” housing policy with such rules is in the works and that it would apply to the Midway District and all other parts of the city.
Housing crisis prompts San Diego to pursue 'inclusionary' legislation opposed by developers

“We feel that the best way to address that issue is through citywide policy,” Hansen said. “Although we share your goal, we feel that adding it to one community planning area is not the right solution.”

On the climate action plan, Sophie Wolfram of Climate Action Campaign said it was frustrating that none of the 10 community plan updates adopted in recent years meet the city’s climate goals.

Councilman Chris Ward agreed, criticizing the plan for its projection that 89 percent of commutes would remain by automobile under the plan. That’s far more than the climate action plan, which calls for automobile commutes to drop below 80 percent by 2020 and to 50 percent by 2035.

“I’m not sure what the disconnect is here,” he said.

Alyssa Muto, the city’s deputy director of environment and mobility planning, said the city would come closer to meeting the goals in upcoming community plans for more transit-friendly areas, such as Mission Valley.

Community leaders, including the Midway Community Planning Group, have spent 11 years working on the plan that was approved on Monday.

“This is an exciting day for our community,” said Cathy Kenton, chair of the planning group. “Your action today signals the start of a new beginning for Midway.”

Kenton said she’s pleased the plan includes upgrades to about 20 intersections and new freeway onramps. They would include a connector from I-5 south to I-8 west, from I-8 east to I-5 north and from Barnett Avenue to I-5 north.

Kenton said those ramps would alleviate congestion because it would eliminate the need to take surface streets to make those connections.

The changes envisioned in the plan would likely happen gradually over the next two decades, but officials said they could accelerate if more than 100 city-owned acres around the arena – branded as the Valley View Casino Center -- get redeveloped quickly and serve as a catalyst to other projects.

Most of the leases for the city-owned land expire in 2020, and city officials have declined to discuss renewals so that ambitious redevelopment of the area can move forward quickly and smoothly.

A developer is also proposing an upscale office complex on the former site of the defunct postal complex on Midway Drive, which could be a catalyst.
Upscale office complex could spur revitalization of sports arena area

City officials say the area is ripe for development because of its central location between downtown, the airport, Mission Bay Park and the city’s beach communities.

The Midway District also has strong freeway access and proximity to mass transit and includes the site of a transportation hub serving the airport that is being planned by the San Diego Association of Governments.
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  #13773  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2018, 4:50 PM
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Ohmygawd stfu on trade issues ppl

As for Midway, I'd like it more if it included a referendum on raising the height limit there.
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  #13774  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2018, 5:19 PM
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Ohmygawd stfu on trade issues ppl

As for Midway, I'd like it more if it included a referendum on raising the height limit there.
Exactly. Can't build the needed level of density without increased building heights. Liberty Station is great and all, but 30' heights would make the Sports Arena area Liberty Station 2.0.

PS: Does anyone have any info/updates on the projects in Mission Valley (Riverwalk, Hazard Center expansion, etc?). Would love to see some of these happen.
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  #13775  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2018, 5:34 PM
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Exactly. Can't build the needed level of density without increased building heights. Liberty Station is great and all, but 30' heights would make the Sports Arena area Liberty Station 2.0.

PS: Does anyone have any info/updates on the projects in Mission Valley (Riverwalk, Hazard Center expansion, etc?). Would love to see some of these happen.
I know the road that is going to connect Fashion Valley with Hazard Center is being dug under the 163 right now. That was a major sticking point for the HZ expansion back in the day. But that proposal is nearly a decade old. Market conditions have changed. Hell, they built a BJs where one of the proposed towers was supposed to go.

As for Riverwalk, they're dealing with some complications. MTS doesn't want them to build a trolley stop in their project because it will slow down the route. They also want the developer to build a connector road right through the property connecting Linda Vista and Camino Del Rio South, which would essentially be a bridge (think freeway on-ramp style) right through the middle of the property. Of course, those are project killing proposals, so the developer is trying to get MTS to embrace an actual transit oriented development.

Not to mention MTS has land right next to Riverwalk and the FV trolley stop that they're sitting on because why not have an empty parcel in a transit priority area?

Fu*king A our transit agency sucks.
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  #13776  
Old Posted Sep 19, 2018, 3:46 AM
Will O' Wisp Will O' Wisp is offline
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I know the road that is going to connect Fashion Valley with Hazard Center is being dug under the 163 right now. That was a major sticking point for the HZ expansion back in the day. But that proposal is nearly a decade old. Market conditions have changed. Hell, they built a BJs where one of the proposed towers was supposed to go.

As for Riverwalk, they're dealing with some complications. MTS doesn't want them to build a trolley stop in their project because it will slow down the route. They also want the developer to build a connector road right through the property connecting Linda Vista and Camino Del Rio South, which would essentially be a bridge (think freeway on-ramp style) right through the middle of the property. Of course, those are project killing proposals, so the developer is trying to get MTS to embrace an actual transit oriented development.

Not to mention MTS has land right next to Riverwalk and the FV trolley stop that they're sitting on because why not have an empty parcel in a transit priority area?

Fu*king A our transit agency sucks.
I can kinda see their point though, at a certain point adding stations to a line actually reduces ridership as it starts to slow down the route as a whole, and Friars Rd is notoriously overloaded with traffic (which is why SANDAG is fighting to connect up the northern end of Civita to Phyllis Pl).
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  #13777  
Old Posted Sep 19, 2018, 1:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Will O' Wisp View Post
I can kinda see their point though, at a certain point adding stations to a line actually reduces ridership as it starts to slow down the route as a whole, and Friars Rd is notoriously overloaded with traffic (which is why SANDAG is fighting to connect up the northern end of Civita to Phyllis Pl).
Sorry, but I'm going to have to politely smack this down.

We need to achieve 50% alternate ride share to meet our legally binding Climate Action Plan goals. Blocking new transit and building more roads is not how we reach our CAP and reduce GHG emissions (let alone provide housing that's sustainable and more enviro-friendly). And, no, EV is not a realistic alternative due to cost and adoption trends. We need to get people out of their cars and onto trolleys, in bike lanes, and on sidewalks.

MTS is a notoriously anti-transit organization, and their actions at Riverwalk exemplify this reality completely.

Hopefully smarter minds will turn MTS around. CM Georgette Gomez, the new-ish MTS Board Chair is working hard to change the culture there, and an MTS bond ballot initiative is coming in 2020 to help build more trolley lines and provide more frequent service.

As for your points on slower trolleys, and traffic on Friars, providing an accessible and reliable transit option for 4k+ new homes (8-10k residents) at Riverwalk is leagues better than a flyover causeway that will end up being congested anyways by induced demand. Road and highway expansion in Southern California is a proven model of failure. We need real alternatives now.
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  #13778  
Old Posted Sep 19, 2018, 3:37 PM
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Originally Posted by SDfan View Post
I know the road that is going to connect Fashion Valley with Hazard Center is being dug under the 163 right now.
I realize this was a side note and not the overall point, but FWIW I'm really happy about this new road. It should take some of the pressure off Friars, making it easier to get around in Mission Valley.
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  #13779  
Old Posted Sep 19, 2018, 3:48 PM
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I honestly hope the construction boom does not slow down. San Diego has so much demand for housing that it should keep up for a few more years hopefully.
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  #13780  
Old Posted Sep 19, 2018, 6:03 PM
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I honestly hope the construction boom does not slow down. San Diego has so much demand for housing that it should keep up for a few more years hopefully.
I think the issue is of course there is huge demand for housing here but can people afford the price points developers need to make their projects pencil. If you built 2000 decent quality 2 bed 2 bath apartments at Civita and they were only $1800 dollars per month they would go like hot cakes, but Sudberry will need 2800 to 3200 a month to make it work...

Do you guys think the market can keep absorbing more and more units at these high prices? Along with the Riverwalk mega development you also will have the Stone Creek project in between Miramar Rd and Mira Mesa that is 2000 units, then the huge 12,000 unit mega project just east of it.

I would say for a huge chunk of the county's population there is about a 30 to 40% disconnect in the price they can afford to pay for these newly built housing units and what the developers want to charge to make their projects pencil out.


SDFAN: and an MTS bond ballot initiative is coming in 2020 to help build more trolley lines and provide more frequent service. Haven;'t heard about this kindly share more details.
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