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  #5201  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2017, 9:11 PM
mcgrath618 mcgrath618 is offline
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Took this today

Last edited by summersm343; Jan 10, 2017 at 3:21 AM. Reason: Resize
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  #5202  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2017, 9:47 PM
Marcos Marcos is offline
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anyone else watch any of the Rocky marathon over the weekend? It is truly astounding to see those shots of the skyline from the mid-late 70's, I remember it well & also remember thinking it would always be that way due to the old agreement... it wasn't until I returned from college that Rouse had pushed through, or up, & the rest is history.

I liked it the old way, the city was unique.

I like it the new way, it's still unique in the way all cities are, but maybe less unique if that's a thing, or are there any other height restricted cities (significant ones) on earth? I don't know.

One thing is for sure, I've loved Philadelphia in every phase of its evolution and these towers are great & add so much. I was in town today & had some time to kill & was going to head up to the observation deck of Liberty to get a closer gander at CTC but it was closed, settled for lunch in the food court
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  #5203  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2017, 11:10 PM
Mr Saturn64 Mr Saturn64 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcos View Post
I liked it the old way, the city was unique.
I often wonder about what Philadelphia's skyline would look like if the Gentlemen's Agreement about buildings surpassing William Penn had never been. I'd wager that we'd probably have at least one Art Deco building from the 1920s/30s in the 600-700 foot range. Then, of course, as we had massive boxes built in the 60s and 70s, they would have only been built bigger had the Penn rule never been a thing. The only thing I still wonder is if we would have had our first thousand footer a long time ago. Probably. I don't think Philadelphia would have gotten one before Chicago in the Art Deco era, but having one in the "big box" era of skyscraper construction may have been feasible. Even if that didn't, it seems pretty likely that something may have come along during the 80s or 90s. Philadelphia's skyscraper boom was due to the breaking of the Gentlemen's Agreement, so who knows?

Anyway, I have come CTC pics. Saturday blizzard is a nice time to be downtown, isn't it?





Barely visible in the thickness of the snow. It's a beautiful thing. Or, at least I think it is.


It was much clearer in the evening.
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  #5204  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2017, 11:51 PM
City Wide City Wide is offline
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Anyway, I have come CTC pics. Saturday blizzard is a nice time to be downtown, isn't it?

Blizzard? As in the great blizzard of '17. I must have missed it
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  #5205  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2017, 3:15 AM
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summersm343 summersm343 is offline
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  #5206  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2017, 4:01 AM
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Philamigo Philamigo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plokoon11 View Post
I'll translate that paragraph to: "Damn workers taking there good old time. This is taking too long! They should be topped out by now." Joking aside.
No, I am a patient person. It will be finished in a timely fashion. I am not one of those kids whining here or the "other" skyscraper site about how long things take to get built. It took 30 years to complete City Hall.

Actually I'm more concerned about the working men on the site and safety issues. Working in snow, windy and freezing weather must be hellish.
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  #5207  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2017, 5:54 AM
allovertown allovertown is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcos View Post
I like it the new way, it's still unique in the way all cities are, but maybe less unique if that's a thing, or are there any other height restricted cities (significant ones) on earth? I don't know.
There are quite a few. Washington D.C. and Paris quickly come to mind, obviously some very significant cities.

Philly was still unique though. Most height limited cities are really height limited. D.C. and Paris, buildings in both cities can't even be 125 feet tall. When you think about it, 548 is really tall. Even forgetting the height limit, if you look at just the past 25 years, excluding buildings still under construction, only the Comcast Center was built taller than City Hall.
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  #5208  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2017, 2:20 PM
jsbrook jsbrook is offline
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Originally Posted by allovertown View Post
There are quite a few. Washington D.C. and Paris quickly come to mind, obviously some very significant cities.

Philly was still unique though. Most height limited cities are really height limited. D.C. and Paris, buildings in both cities can't even be 125 feet tall. When you think about it, 548 is really tall. Even forgetting the height limit, if you look at just the past 25 years, excluding buildings still under construction, only the Comcast Center was built taller than City Hall.
Mmm...One Liberty was completed in 1987. But Two Liberty was built in 1990. And Mellon Bank Center, Three Logan, the Fred DiBona building (where BlueCross is), and the Commerce Square Towers were all built in the 1990s...I guess some of these were built in 90 or 91 so fit your criteria. Two Commerce completed in 1992. Maybe that's really the only one other than Comcast Center. So, I guess you're right. I attribute it to the Philly economy and population shed prior to the last 10 or so years.
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  #5209  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2017, 5:48 PM
Philly Fan Philly Fan is offline
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American flag now flying at the top of the current framing, which I assume symbolizes reaching the top of what will be the occupied portion of the tower:

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  #5210  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2017, 6:06 PM
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summersm343 summersm343 is offline
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Update from Building Philly





https://www.facebook.com/BuildingPhilly
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  #5211  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2017, 8:53 PM
Kidphilly Kidphilly is offline
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Originally Posted by Philly Fan View Post
American flag now flying at the top of the current framing, which I assume symbolizes reaching the top of what will be the occupied portion of the tower:

went up quick all things considered that is impressive regardless of wishing for higher


am not sure if this or the FMC is more impactful but having both is a great thing
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  #5212  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2017, 8:59 PM
Mr Saturn64 Mr Saturn64 is offline
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Originally Posted by City Wide View Post
Anyway, I have come CTC pics. Saturday blizzard is a nice time to be downtown, isn't it?

Blizzard? As in the great blizzard of '17. I must have missed it
I know it wasn't a bonafide blizzard, but it sure felt like it out there.


Quote:
Originally Posted by allovertown View Post
There are quite a few. Washington D.C. and Paris quickly come to mind, obviously some very significant cities.

Philly was still unique though. Most height limited cities are really height limited. D.C. and Paris, buildings in both cities can't even be 125 feet tall.
In those cases, both of those cities have very appealing cityscapes. Washington would not look as grand and powerful of a city as it is with skyscrapers higher than the Capitol Building. And Paris does have La Defense and the surrounding vicinity, and the older part of the city still looks great. Skyscrapers are good, but evidently not in every case.
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  #5213  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2017, 9:17 PM
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summersm343 summersm343 is offline
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Boston has a pretty strict height limit of around 800 ft in most of the city due to the proximity of Logan Airport. Much of London has height limits and preserved historical buildings as well. I believe Rome also has a height limit. Barcelona too.
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  #5214  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2017, 10:38 PM
Philly Fan Philly Fan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by summersm343 View Post
Boston has a pretty strict height limit of around 800 ft in most of the city due to the proximity of Logan Airport. Much of London has height limits and preserved historical buildings as well. I believe Rome also has a height limit. Barcelona too.
Yeah, and that's really hurt those cities in terms of their international significance and popularity as world-class tourist destinations.
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  #5215  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2017, 10:49 PM
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summersm343 summersm343 is offline
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Originally Posted by Philly Fan View Post
Yeah, and that's really hurt those cities in terms of their international significance and popularity as world-class tourist destinations.
Exactly. Skyscrapers definitely aren't everything.

London - arguably one of the premiere cities in the world, along with New York City and Hong Kong - currently only has 39 towers over 400 FT tall. Chicago, Miami, San Francisco, Houston and Las Vegas all have more than that in the US. London is the premiere and more prestigious city over all of them by a landslide.

Rome has two buildings over 400 FT tall. Barcelona has 4. If you combine Paris and La Defense, then the Paris region only has 30 buildings over 400 FT tall, which is the same exact number currently as Philadelphia.

Philadelphia has a beautiful skyline, and more highrises will continue to be built. We don't need to compete with NYC, Chicago and Miami to build an international brand.
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  #5216  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2017, 11:16 PM
iheartphilly iheartphilly is offline
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Originally Posted by summersm343 View Post
Exactly. Skyscrapers definitely aren't everything.

London - arguably one of the premiere cities in the world, along with New York City and Hong Kong - currently only has 39 towers over 400 FT tall. Chicago, Miami, San Francisco, Houston and Las Vegas all have more than that in the US. London is the premiere and more prestigious city over all of them by a landslide.

Rome has two buildings over 400 FT tall. Barcelona has 4. If you combine Paris and La Defense, then the Paris region only has 30 buildings over 400 FT tall, which is the same exact number currently as Philadelphia.

Philadelphia has a beautiful skyline, and more highrises will continue to be built. We don't need to compete with NYC, Chicago and Miami to build an international brand.
Not everything is about height. For example, London has buildings over several thousands years old. We obviously can't touch that fact.
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  #5217  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2017, 11:36 PM
Philly Fan Philly Fan is offline
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Originally Posted by iheartphilly View Post
Not everything is about height. For example, London has buildings over several thousands years old. We obviously can't touch that fact.
But . . . but . . . but we have buildings that are a few hundred years old.
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  #5218  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2017, 1:12 AM
jjv007 jjv007 is offline
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Originally Posted by Philly Fan View Post
Yeah, and that's really hurt those cities in terms of their international significance and popularity as world-class tourist destinations.
I agree height is not the be all, end all, but let's not compare apples to oranges here. Pretty much the only elite global cities with minimal skylines are ancient cities from Europe, with thousands-year old history. Even there, cities like London are now starting to buck the trend. In North America, Asia, the Middle East, Australia, and other places, major cities generally have major skylines. The reason for some major South American, African, and Indian cities not having major skylines is more of an issue of economic might and capability rather than planned structure.
Flight path limitations to height (such as in Boston or San Diego) are definitely not in the same category as chosen height limits. And I find that the limitations are generally a sore spot for most Bostonians who care about these kinds of frivolities lol (like us weirdos). Boston's still is doing the most it can with its limits and has about a dozen 400+ foot buildings in the works I believe, so it's not like they're staying put.
As for Washington D.C., I guess they're the exception that proves the rule
(And they're not technically a city either )
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  #5219  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2017, 1:24 AM
Plokoon11 Plokoon11 is offline
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On the webcam I couldn't help but notice a American flag on the top, very small but is this the topping out?
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  #5220  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2017, 1:29 AM
Philly Fan Philly Fan is offline
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Originally Posted by Plokoon11 View Post
On the webcam I couldn't help but notice a American flag on the top, very small but is this the topping out?
Pretty sure they put that up today. And yes, I assume it's to commemorate that they've reached the top of the occupied portion of the building.
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