HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > City Compilations

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #4101  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2017, 12:29 AM
BrandonJXN's Avatar
BrandonJXN BrandonJXN is offline
Ascension
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Posts: 5,010
Might not mean anything but this might certainly effect LA's Olympic bid one way or another.
__________________
Washed Out
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4102  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2017, 12:42 AM
King Kill 'em's Avatar
King Kill 'em King Kill 'em is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Burbank, CA
Posts: 1,200
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliNative View Post
A few taller buildings (20-35 stories) built in the 1920s would maybe have replaced just a few of the shorter buildings. I doubt the area or "footprint" of DTLA would have shrunk much. It just would have meant a more interesting skyline with some more high points besides City Hall. Of course if more of the buildings had added 10 or 15 stories, it would have shrunk the footprint. More likely it might have meant 5 or 10 buildings above 20 stories by 1929 in the absense of the 150' limit, without much shrinkage of the CBD area. I doubt L.A. would have had a 50+ story like the Terminal Tower in Cleveland. Probably just a smattering of 20+, with maybe a few around 25-30 stories (like San Francisco in the 1920s).
I wonder how the absence of a 150 ft. height limit would have also affected development in Koreatown, Westlake, and Hollywood.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4103  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2017, 1:40 AM
Prahaboheme Prahaboheme is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 1,468
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrandonJXN View Post
Might not mean anything but this might certainly effect LA's Olympic bid one way or another.
In what way might it affect the bid?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4104  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2017, 8:10 AM
CaliNative CaliNative is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 355
L.A. gets the Lucas "Star Wars" Museum

A celebration is in order. Must have been a tough choice for George. But the museum will probably get more visitors in Expo. Park. Treasure Island has the view, but it seems isolated from the city. How many tourists would have gone out there? The Lucas USC film school connection, plus L.A./Hollywood still being the center of film production trumps Lucas living in Marin County. Oh well--S.F. got a Disney Museum in the Presideo (that really should be in L.A. or Burbank or Anaheim) so I guess this is fair. Lucas will probably get some sour looks from his neighbors up there, but he made the right choice. Thanks George

Last edited by CaliNative; Jan 11, 2017 at 8:25 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4105  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2017, 8:20 AM
CaliNative CaliNative is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 355
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mojeda101 View Post
I'd like to think LA would've looked similar to Philadelphia from 1935.

L.A. (city) only had 500,000 people in 1920 (doubling to over a million in 1930). Philadelphia in the 1920s was still a much larger city than Los Angeles. So I doubt DTLA (in the absense of the 150' limit) would have had quite so many skyscrapers as Philadelphia had. But who knows? Maybe you're right. Which one of those buildings housed the offices of Duke & Duke Commodities?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4106  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2017, 8:32 AM
CaliNative CaliNative is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 355
Quote:
Originally Posted by King Kill 'em View Post
I wonder how the absence of a 150 ft. height limit would have also affected development in Koreatown, Westlake, and Hollywood.
Seems likely that Hollywood could have had a few buildings above 20 stories in the '20s, and maybe Westlake area and mid-Wilshire also. Long Beach (without the 150' limit) had at least one building above 250' in the late '20s, and several more planned (apartment and office towers), but they weren't built when the Depression shut down construction.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4107  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2017, 8:40 AM
CaliNative CaliNative is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 355
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prahaboheme View Post
In what way might it affect the bid?
I think Paris has the best chance landing the 2024 games, since it is the 100th anniversery of the 1924 games made famous in "Chariots of Fire". L.A.'s best chance is 2028 or 2032 (100th ann. of 1932 games), if it can hold off S.F., Chicago or NYC. By then the transit infrastructure REALLY will be complete.

Maybe we should try something different--a California bid with opening ceremonies in L.A. and closing ceremonies in S.F. (or vis versa), with events shared between the 2, and maybe S.D. as well. I mean really, the boating events should be in S.F., and track, swimming & beach volleyball in L.A. Flip a coin for gymnastics & basketball & boxing. Jerry's choo choo train or Elon Musk's pneumatic tube could whisk people between the cities in 90 minutes.

Last edited by CaliNative; Jan 11, 2017 at 8:59 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4108  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2017, 11:57 AM
BrandonJXN's Avatar
BrandonJXN BrandonJXN is offline
Ascension
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Posts: 5,010
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliNative View Post
I think Paris has the best chance landing the 2024 games, since it is the 100th anniversery of the 1924 games made famous in "Chariots of Fire". L.A.'s best chance is 2028 or 2032 (100th ann. of 1932 games), if it can hold off S.F., Chicago or NYC. By then the transit infrastructure REALLY will be complete.

Maybe we should try something different--a California bid with opening ceremonies in L.A. and closing ceremonies in S.F. (or vis versa), with events shared between the 2, and maybe S.D. as well. I mean really, the boating events should be in S.F., and track, swimming & beach volleyball in L.A. Flip a coin for gymnastics & basketball & boxing. Jerry's choo choo train or Elon Musk's pneumatic tube could whisk people between the cities in 90 minutes.
Anniversaries mean nothing in Olympics. Athens insisted that they should be rewarded the Centennial games in 1996 just because they brought back the modern Olympics in 1896. They lost out to plucky little Atlanta. Sure Athens won in 2004 but it brought the country to near ruin.

San Francisco, Chicago, and NYC won't bid for another Olympics for a VERY long time.

I should clarify: I don't think that the Lucas Museum automatically means that LA wins the games but a high profile museum 50 feet from the Coliseum attracting a worldwide audience is something you can't ignore.
__________________
Washed Out
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4109  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2017, 12:34 PM
BrandonJXN's Avatar
BrandonJXN BrandonJXN is offline
Ascension
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Posts: 5,010
A reminder of the LA bid...

Video Link
__________________
Washed Out
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4110  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2017, 4:06 PM
citywatch citywatch is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 5,076
one of the benefits of the lucas museum....beyond its impact on the city's cultural scene....is it finally resolves a problem I've long had with expo pk: eliminating that unappealing large parking lot sitting to the west of the coliseum & natural history museum since the beginning of time.

that has long made that area of LA not too hospitable...not a very good background or foreground, depending on where a person is standing....for events at the coliseum or when visiting the natural history museum. It didn't make for a very appealing view for ppl attending events at the coliseum when the olympics were held there back in 1984.

I originally thought the city wanted to locate the museum where the old sports arena had been located. So when that instead was reserved for the new soccer stadium, I thought ppl like eric garcetti may not have been keeping track of things correctly....

a museum in the southeast corner of the expo pk area also seemed like it would have bad feng shui to me. But the new stadium being there instead & now the new museum being in the northwest corner of expo pk seems right.

a writer based in britain makes a good point about one type of art museum & the type that george Lucas is interested in...

Quote:
George Lucas's LA museum brings new hope to art's storytellers

A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away, George Lucas was a gifted film director. The release of Star Wars in 1977 – long before we had to call it Part IV or A New Hope – was a seismic event in modern culture that abolished the difference between art and entertainment.

It was not a metaphysical allegory of the future but simply a good story. The point of setting it in the past in a remote part of the universe is that it has no relevance to reality here on Earth. It’s a tale, a legend, a myth. Lucas put aside every value except narrative excitement and identification with his characters. This was an epic yarn, pure and simple.

Now Lucas is to create, at his own huge expense, a museum in Los Angeles that not only shows off his collection of art along with relics from his films but makes an argument about art’s purpose.

When he praises narrative in art, Lucas clearly doesn’t mean a cathartic performance by Marina Abramović or a historically evocative film by William Kentridge. His collection of over 10,000 items stresses painters and graphic artists whose work is highly accessible. That master of folksy American scenes Norman Rockwell features among his treasures, as does the brilliant comic book art of Robert Crumb. Lucas also collects the work of NC Wyeth, who illustrated boy’s adventure books with exciting images of derring-do.

Put all this together with his Star Wars memorabilia and you have a museum that is likely to elicit scorn from art world snobs. Tate Modern or MoMA it ain’t. Instead, it’s an honest personal vision of what art should be like – and Lucas may be vindicated, just as he was when Star Wars entranced the world four decades ago.

He is right. Art has forgotten the power of popular storytelling that was once its main reason to exist. In previous ages the most important job of visual art was to tell tales. Painters and sculptors were commissioned to create compelling narrative art that was put in churches to move and harrow the whole community.

Paintings that told stories provided the cinema of the Romantic age. People queued up to see paintings like Géricault’s The Raft of the Medusa or The Execution of Lady Jane Grey by Delaroche. Today this instinct for gutsy, popular storytelling is exiled from the art world. Culturally respected art tends to be abstract or conceptual. Painters who tell stories, like Norman Rockwell, get faint praise at best.

A lot has been lost. The passion for narrative is universal. Why can’t visual art address the same need for a good story that is satisfied by Game of Thrones? Forty years ago George Lucas changed cinema. Perhaps now he can save art.
Quote:
“This is a real triumph for the city of L.A., and this will be a transformative opportunity for L.A.,” Katzenberg said Tuesday after learning of Lucas’ decision. “First and foremost for our residents, who are going to have an outstanding cultural, iconic new force here — the force will be with us — and I think for tourism, and for the continued, extraordinary transformation of downtown Los Angeles, and for Exposition Park and the other museums it will be joining.”

Exposition Park could become the Central Park of Los Angeles, Garcetti said, adding that Lucas has expressed interest in helping to guide a master plan for the swiftly evolving area, already home to the California Science Center, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County and the California African American Museum. Plans for the new museum, which will rise along Vermont Avenue on land now covered by parking lots, will include underground parking.

“We have a new football stadium being built, the Coliseum being redone with more than $200 million in upgrades, and the science center is building a whole new building to permanently house the space shuttle and its rockets,” Garcetti said, also noting the proximity to the Expo light rail line and bus lines. The Lucas Museum, he said, “will be the jewel in the crown.”

“There’s an understanding of L.A.’s growing cultural influence and growing and diverse audiences for museums here,” LACMA’s Govan said Tuesday. “We ended 2016 with over 1.5 million visitors.” He said the Lucas Museum will present visual culture from a different point of view, one that “makes so much sense in a city known equally for art and for film.”

Philanthropist and Broad museum founder Eli Broad called the Lucas Museum “one of the most important cultural and tourist additions to our city in the last 25 years.”

“I spoke to both George Lucas and Mellody personally about our great success at the Broad,” the philanthropist said. “We’ve had over 1 million visitors since we opened in 2015, and I’d expect the attendance at the Lucas Museum will be equal or even succeed that.”
a good time to say "thank you!" & dance

Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4111  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2017, 4:29 PM
bobbyv bobbyv is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 271
Frank Gehry's $1-billion downtown project could finally be a go after a Chinese builder's $290-million investment

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-f...103-story.html
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4112  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2017, 5:22 PM
cargocultpants cargocultpants is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliNative View Post
Seems likely that Hollywood could have had a few buildings above 20 stories in the '20s, and maybe Westlake area and mid-Wilshire also. Long Beach (without the 150' limit) had at least one building above 250' in the late '20s, and several more planned (apartment and office towers), but they weren't built when the Depression shut down construction.
One way to think about it is to consider other regional cities that didn't have the height cap. So, in Long Beach, you have a handful of tall, attractive buildings that exceed what could be built in LA at the time. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Villa_Riviera and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ocean_Center_Building being the two most prominent (and I imagine there were more that have perhaps been torn down since.) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o..._in_Long_Beach

Some LA buildings were allowed to break the height limit. Most notable https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_Columbia_Building (because the top was a clock tower) and the sadly demolished https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richfield_Tower

All in all, I think there certainly would have been a handful of more, slightly taller buildings in downtown, but nothing an order of magnitude different.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4113  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2017, 5:50 PM
ChelseaFC ChelseaFC is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 560
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4114  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2017, 7:15 PM
LosAngelesSportsFan's Avatar
LosAngelesSportsFan LosAngelesSportsFan is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 6,409
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbyv View Post
Frank Gehry's $1-billion downtown project could finally be a go after a Chinese builder's $290-million investment

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-f...103-story.html
so 20 story hotel, 39 story residential and 8 destination restaurants... Get er done.. Could it have been more? Yes, much more. But i actually think it looks pretty good. My only complaint is the height and loss of more potential housing units
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4115  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2017, 9:01 PM
ocman ocman is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Paris
Posts: 1,927
Quote:
Originally Posted by LosAngelesSportsFan View Post
so 20 story hotel, 39 story residential and 8 destination restaurants... Get er done.. Could it have been more? Yes, much more. But i actually think it looks pretty good. My only complaint is the height and loss of more potential housing units
Gehry projects tend to improve when he's given plenty of time to reflect back. Happened with Disney Hall too. But what a huge 10 year f-k up this process was. Related should have never won the bid. And it should have been taken away from them sometime during those 10 years. Maybe fk-ups are expected considering Eli Broad helped steer the committee.

I remember when this was such an exciting project that was supposed to alter the skyline. Now everyone just wants something built. Whatever it is.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4116  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2017, 9:06 PM
LosAngelesSportsFan's Avatar
LosAngelesSportsFan LosAngelesSportsFan is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 6,409
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocman View Post
Gehry projects tend to improve when he's given plenty of time to reflect back. Happened with Disney Hall too. But what a huge 10 year f-k up this process was. Related should have never won the bid. And it should have been taken away from them sometime during those 10 years. Maybe fk-ups are expected considering Eli Broad helped steer the committee.

I remember when this was such an exciting project that was supposed to alter the skyline. Now everyone just wants something built. Whatever it is.
i agree completely. Its not ambitious enough and could have been so much more, but it is what it is
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4117  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2017, 10:16 PM
mbb mbb is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliNative View Post
Which one of those buildings housed the offices of Duke & Duke Commodities?
The real building is Fidelity Bank, 135 South Broad Street. Not sure which one it is in the picture, but it should be close to city hall, which you can see.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4118  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2017, 10:31 PM
LDVArch LDVArch is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocman View Post
Peter Zumthor may feel the need to rework his plans for LACMA now. The two designs are somewhat superficially similar, at least at the exterior.
Two different design philosophies.

Yansong's work has been compared to that of Hadid. Zumthor's work to that of Kahn.

One is more a sculpture to be seen in the round. The other an aggregation of spaces and materials to be experienced.

One is more an architecture of the future, the other an architecture with almost primitive roots.

One will be more like Walt Disney Hall, the other more like the LA Cathedral.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4119  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2017, 6:37 AM
ozone's Avatar
ozone ozone is online now
Top Retributor
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Golden Capitol
Posts: 2,016
Frank Gehry's Grand Avenue Project finally moving forward is the best news I've heard in a long time. This + the Lucas Museum + now San Diego Chargers are moving to LA, What? LA's on a roll.
__________________
“Skyscrapers! Unhealthy ugly giants! To live and work as close as to the land is a blessing! Remember, you are not a cloud! Come down and live on the ground!”
― Mehmet Murat ildan
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4120  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2017, 6:50 AM
ChelseaFC ChelseaFC is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 560
Quote:
Originally Posted by ozone View Post
Frank Gehry's Grand Avenue Project finally moving forward is the best news I've heard in a long time. This + the Lucas Museum + now San Diego Chargers are moving to LA, What? LA's on a roll.
This isn't a plus, at all. Just saying.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > City Compilations
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 5:24 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.