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  #1061  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2007, 12:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LordMandeep View Post
don't tell me your using the what would Jesus do excuse...
That's "you're." And excuse for what? I support unions because I have more than an ounce of moral fibre- Neilson is a professional Catholic; the RC church has always, always supported unions, and I think Jesus would too.
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  #1062  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2007, 1:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackRedGold View Post
I didn't ask for cities, I asked for industries.
the big 3 auto industry is a prime example of that
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  #1063  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2007, 2:57 AM
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Originally Posted by West_aust View Post
the big 3 auto industry is a prime example of that
The auto industry is fine. There are lots of cars being sold. Some companies in that industry may not be fine but a couple of companies do not make an industry.
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  #1064  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2007, 3:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackRedGold View Post
I didn't ask for cities, I asked for industries.
Look at the major industries in those cities. Steel, Cars, Manufacturing.

THOSE are what I'm referring to. The cities are simply the result of the industries in those cities dying off.
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  #1065  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2007, 3:23 AM
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Originally Posted by furrycanuck View Post
That's "you're." And excuse for what? I support unions because I have more than an ounce of moral fibre- Neilson is a professional Catholic; the RC church has always, always supported unions, and I think Jesus would too.
I support Unions, in the vain of the ACFTU and not so much in the vain of the CAW/UAW.
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  #1066  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2007, 3:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackRedGold View Post
The auto industry is fine. There are lots of cars being sold. Some companies in that industry may not be fine but a couple of companies do not make an industry.
that's why i mentioned the big 3 (GM, Ford, Chrysler)

And most of the other companies doing well with plants in the US are non-unionized
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  #1067  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2007, 3:52 AM
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Originally Posted by West_aust View Post
that's why i mentioned the big 3 (GM, Ford, Chrysler)

And most of the other companies doing well with plants in the US are non-unionized
Exactly. Hyundai couldn't make it in Quebec with the culture that exists about Unionized Labor.

Hyundai does just fine in Alabama today because we don't like Unions down here. You know, the reason we're called "Rednecks" came from the fact that the common southern man would work all day on the fields, doing his farm work. Now, they didn't have sunscreen back in the day so naturally your neck became red from being outside and slightly bent down while doing farming.

We work hard, and we're only as good as the job we do. We're not a Pro-Union ppl down here, and that's what gives us the growth we're seeing here. I'll tell you about 2 Supermarket Chains that are huge in the South(I'm talking in Atlanta, Nashville, Greenville/Spartanburg, and Columbia). Kroger and Publix. Now, Kroger is Union. Publix is not. I worked at Publix and made $6.25 an hour as a bag boy. Great atmosphere and they took care of you. Kroger however......is not as good as Publix. Not to their employees at least, not in their Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia, or Carolinas stores.
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  #1068  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2007, 5:21 AM
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Hyundai was in quebec when hyundai was crap and loosing alot of money, it was before its time.

Now they build much better cars, if they were to have a plant now, it would be well and kicking.
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  #1069  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2007, 12:34 PM
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Originally Posted by neilson View Post
Look at the major industries in those cities. Steel, Cars, Manufacturing.

THOSE are what I'm referring to. The cities are simply the result of the industries in those cities dying off.
Steel demand has never been higher. The auto industry is still huge. I doubt the manufacturing industry is dead.

Your unionphobia is based upon faulty assumptions.
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  #1070  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2007, 2:02 PM
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Originally Posted by BlackRedGold View Post
Steel demand has never been higher. The auto industry is still huge. I doubt the manufacturing industry is dead.

Your unionphobia is based upon faulty assumptions.
They're not as big and dominant in the Midwest as they once were. You're seeing a shift to foreign nations and traditionally non-union/right to work states where these sorts of industries want to move to and/or have moved to.
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  #1071  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2007, 2:58 PM
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Jesus was a card-carrying UAW member.
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  #1072  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2007, 3:38 PM
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Originally Posted by neilson View Post
They're not as big and dominant in the Midwest as they once were. You're seeing a shift to foreign nations and traditionally non-union/right to work states where these sorts of industries want to move to and/or have moved to.
This wasn't about industries being less dominant in regions. It was about unions KILLING industries. Or at least that's what you claimed.

The manufacturing sector in the US moved to China and it wasn't a result of unions killing the industry. It was a result of price efficiencies that could not be replicated in the US while paying anything close to minimium wage.
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  #1073  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2007, 3:45 PM
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Originally Posted by BlackRedGold View Post
This wasn't about industries being less dominant in regions. It was about unions KILLING industries. Or at least that's what you claimed.

The manufacturing sector in the US moved to China and it wasn't a result of unions killing the industry. It was a result of price efficiencies that could not be replicated in the US while paying anything close to minimium wage.
But that mindset is ignorant. Both are tied hand in hand. To try and say otherwise to make your point is foolish as best.

Unless we're talking about ACFTU type Unions, in which case companies seem to succeed quite well under that model(though ideally I prefer no Union).
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  #1074  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2007, 5:18 PM
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http://www.thestar.com/Business/article/207343

Quote:
Wal-Mart rolling out green label

TheStar.com
April 26, 2007
Dana Flavelle
Business reporter

After years of competing mainly on price, the Canadian unit of the world's largest retailer says the environment is now part of the "value" equation for consumers.

Wal-Mart Canada will introduce its own green label today to identify products that have been certified as environmentally friendly.

The company says it will also flex its considerable muscle with suppliers, working with them to develop more products that qualify for its logo, "For the Greener Good."

"Wal-Mart is not just about cost," said Wal-Mart Canada's chief executive officer, Mario Pilozzi.

"Wal-Mart is about delivering value to our customers so they can live better lives. I don't think we want to be known only as selling less than anyone else."

The new logo is part of a broader initiative aimed at reducing corporate waste, cutting energy use and generally becoming a better neighbour, the company said.

"I want to change how we conduct business," Pilozzi said in a telephone interview yesterday. "I want to change the mindset of the company and make us a much more responsible company. Not to say that we haven't always been responsible."

Other retailers have undertaken similar initiatives. Home Depot Canada introduced its own "Eco Options" logo nearly three years ago. Loblaw Cos. Ltd. relaunched its 20-year-old PC Green program earlier this month, adding what it calls the world's "greenest" shopping bag to the assortment.

The moves by some of the country's biggest retailers to tap into the environmental craze aren't surprising. However, it's far from clear how many of Wal-Mart's customers are ready to follow its lead.

Some U.S. reports have said Wal-Mart's mainly lower-income customers can't or won't pay the higher price of being green. Environmentally friendly products usually cost more than conventional products.

Pilozzi said he doesn't see that as an issue, and if anything Wal-Mart is helping making it easier by driving down the price of such goods, partly due to its enormous buying power and by working with suppliers to develop lower-price store brands.

Its private label compact fluorescent bulb, for example, is one of the lowest priced on the market, the retailer said.

The first products to bear Wal-Mart's new logo are the appliances rated by Energy Star, the internationally recognized symbol of energy efficiency, the company said. The next category will likely be its new line of organic cotton clothing.

The retailer says only those items certified by independent authorities will get the Wal-Mart logo, an approach other retailers have taken.

"We're looking for third parties to certify these products so we're not just slapping labels on our shelves," Pilozzi said.

This approach means only 100 items out of the 40,000 carried in a typical Wal-Mart store currently bear the Greener Good label, Pilozzi said. But thousands more likely qualify, a spokesperson said later.

The retailer said it would be using its considerable clout with suppliers to develop more.

"There are times when being the large retailer that we are comes in handy. We can leverage that sort of power with the vendor," Pilozzi said.
very altruistic move of course
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  #1075  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2007, 10:38 PM
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From: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servl...ce_login=false
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Quote:
Pizza chains eye slice of each other's pie
B.C.-based Panago moves into Ontario; Pizza Pizza targets Western Canada

KEITH MCARTHUR
FOOD AND BEVERAGE REPORTER
Canada's pizza industry is bracing for a pie fight, as two of the country's largest players expand into each other's turf.

Pizza Pizza Ltd., Canada's largest takeout and delivery chain, is planning to expand into Western Canada. And Panago Pizza Inc., the largest player in the West, opens its first restaurant today in Pizza Pizza's Toronto stronghold.

"It sounds like a fait accompli that they're both going to go into each others' backyard," said Chris Rankin, an analyst who covers Pizza Pizza Royalty Income Fund for Canaccord Adams.

"It's a logical development. If you reach a place where you're pretty well built, that's what you have to do."

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The pizza business in Canada has historically been geographically segmented, with Panago dominant in the West, Pizza Pizza in Ontario and Greco Pizza Restaurant in Atlantic Canada.

But Greco has been expanding into Quebec and Ontario, while Pizza Pizza has opened stores in Quebec.

Panago has gradually been moving east from its British Columbia base. The privately held Abbotsford, B.C., chain opened its first Ontario restaurant in Oakville three years ago and also has Ontario franchises in Ajax, Whitby and London.

Chief executive officer Sean DeGregorio, who began working at the chain as a pizza maker 20 years ago, says he's planning to open 150 Panago restaurants in Southern Ontario. And most of that growth will come at the expense of the province's established players, he said yesterday.

"I would think a majority of it would be stealing share. This business -- darned right -- is competitive, but we have the type of system that allows us to compete very well with just about anybody in the pizza business . . .," Mr. DeGregorio said yesterday.

"I have a vision where I would like to see us become Canada's first national home-grown pizza chain."

He said the 159-store pizza chain will differentiate itself from established players both through its gourmet brand positioning and what he called a strong relationship with its franchises.

Mr. Rankin at Canaccord Adams said Pizza Pizza and Panago will affect each other's business, but predicted that the bigger impact will be on the mom and pop pizzerias that have gradually ceded ground to the growing chains.

"Pizza Pizza's a very well-established chain. . . . Can they be competed against? Sure," Mr. Rankin said.

Pizza Pizza, which has 507 locations, mostly in Ontario, declined a request for an interview about its plans for Western Canada. But in the company's most recent annual information form, dated March 30, the company said it is eyeing "new markets across Canada."

"Pizza Pizza is continuing market research in Western Canada in anticipation of an expansion program, with site selection to follow favourable market research. Management anticipates that growth in Western Canada may also be accomplished through strategic acquisitions," the company said.

The Toronto-based company says its same-store sales have grown at an average of 8.3 per cent a year since 1997, with total sales last year of over $360-million.

Panago, founded in 1986, puts a focus on premium ingredients, including blue cheese, dry cured pepperoni and grilled vegetables imported from Italy.

Mr. DeGregorio put himself through business school as a pizza maker at a Panago franchise in Kamloops and frequently used the company as a case study for assignments. After graduation, he was hired to work in the company's head office.

The privately held company does not release audited financial data, but said it had $120-million in sales in 2006. Mr. DeGregorio said it was the best year in the company's history with same-store sales growth of about 10 per cent, compared with about 5 per cent for the rest of the industry.

"Our focus is not really on taking other companies on and going toe to toe. Our focus is really on ourselves. we know that with our system, we have the ability to be successful," he said.
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  #1076  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2007, 10:41 PM
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From: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servl...ce_login=false
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Quote:
Duelling malls
The massive Pacific Mall has a new competitor across the street. Welcome to Splendid China Tower, which ramps up the Asian influence at Steeles and Kennedy in Markham, writes ANDREA LAU

ANDREA LAU
Special to The Globe and Mail
Painted gods and heroes stare from behind the glass of the curio shop, their porcelain gazes alternately imposing and beneficent. Their faces are straight out of legend: There's the fearsome red-faced Guan Yu, an ancient warrior deified by folklore and famed for his bladed spear, standing on the same shelf as Guan Yin, the goddess of mercy and compassion worshipped by Buddhists and Taoists alike. The god of longevity, with a twinkle in his eye and a peach in his hand, boasts a long white beard, individual wisps frozen, yet still fluffy.

The detail is amazing, as is the $880 price tag on the back of his head -- auspicious, though, as the Chinese equate the number eight with good fortune. The crowd around the cash register, however, is more interested in something being advertised for a dollar. What are they all looking at? Tiger's-eye prayer beads? Jade pendants? No . . . plastic cellphone charms.

Elsewhere in the mall, business is slow on this bitingly cold weekend. Many vacant and papered-over storefronts await customers with written signs chirping, "Exciting new retail!!! Opening soon!!"

Competition between malls speaks to the growing confidence of the area's many prosperous Chinese-Canadian suburbanites. Splendid China Tower, the latest Asian condo mall to spring up at Steeles and Kennedy, may aim to become the biggest one in North America, but as yet it is still depending on overflow from Pacific Mall across the street. Over there, intergenerational families and courting couples flock to buy ginseng and abalone and pirated DVDs, to drink bubble tea and eat pastries of red bean and lotus paste, to haunt the arcade and sing karaoke.

"We don't want to compare," says Paul Jone, the owner of Visar Realty Inc. Brokerage, which is marketing Splendid China. He explains that the neighbouring malls will work together in bringing increased prosperity to this span of the Markham border. "We will be complementary to each other, not competition. But Splendid China is different -- it has a more cultural perception in terms of the design and the theme."

Amy Chan, who runs Easy Win, the convenience store right at the entrance to the mall, points out that the proximity to a GO train station makes the shopping easily accessible to those who don't live in the area. She observes that 90 per cent of the clientele are Chinese, speculating that two-thirds are immigrants from Hong Kong and mainland China.

Ms. Chan has also noticed that visitors gravitate toward the stage in the centre of the mall, with the giant television screens overhanging it.

Sudden electronic music blares from the stage. Lissome models shuffle across the platform, rehearsing for a fashion show, and strobe lights swivel overhead. One girl steps off the stage and meets her boyfriend, who proffers a bottle of green tea.

Their hair -- hers streaked straw blond, his manipulated by product into something deserving of an anime character -- mark them as one of the self-identified "fob" couples that populate high schools of the Toronto suburban jungle. They are Asian teenagers, most of them immigrants, who have appropriated the derogatory term, absorbed the "fresh off the boat" insult and turned it into a subculture, melding Cantonese with English and indulging in Japanese-imported brands of decorative toys.

Clearly, Mr. Jone is not alone in succeeding in his goal to "beautify and modernize," as he puts it, the landscape of Chinese-Canadian culture.

Jessica Wong, 21, who frequents the mall, counts a number of fobs among her close friends from the clique-driven days of high school. She self-identifies as a fob only when she listens to Cantopop music, observing that fobs rarely socialize outside of their circles. "They don't necessarily want to fit into Canadian culture," she says. "Fob culture arises 'cause there's no pressure to fit in like Asians that live in the States."

Splendid China promises to be a future locus of much fob culture. The retail condominium built from the shell of a Canadian Tire store, while not quite a tower yet, has lofty ambitions. On the ground floor, restaurant Hi Shanghai takes a page from the stylebook of Spring Rolls, with glass columns in the foyer housing elegant sprigs of flowers; meanwhile, empty fast-food stalls upstairs eerily resemble half-constructed model kitchens.

Eventually, if all goes to plan, a Jade and Jewellery Market and auction platform will add colour to these clean, minimal halls. A third floor will be home to the Festival Palace (a 35,000-square-foot banquet hall) and multiple ballrooms. An indoor garage with more than 2,000 parking spaces will welcome future patrons and connect to the main mall via a glass overpass. There will be a rooftop garden, a waterfall and a hotel.

"This mall has a lot of potential," says Dan Ngo, who owns Update TV & Stereo. His business is based in Chinatown, but he chose to open a branch in Splendid China, betting that "in the future it'll be prosperous."

Not to be outdone, Pacific Mall and its sister complex Market Village announced last June their plans to expand their combined retail space to one million square feet, including a luxury hotel. The Asian theme will bring the tourists, Mr. Jone says, and "the non-Chinese shopper would be attracted by the culture."

The goal of these cultural centres of consumerism is to bring diversity and more shopping choices to the local community in Markham. True, there is no shortage of fashion and beauty retail stores, fast-food outlets, and cellphone carriers, but the herbalists selling seeds and spores, the feng shui consultant and the traditional grand-opening potted plants wreathed in red ribbon are reminders that Splendid China is not the Eaton Centre.
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  #1077  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2007, 10:43 PM
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From: http://www.canada.com/nationalpost/f...16101e&k=63094
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Forever 21 targets Canadian teens
Hollie Shaw, Financial Post
Published: Wednesday, April 25, 2007
Another wildly successful pioneer of "cheap chic" unisex clothing is about to hit Canada.
Forever 21, a Los Angelesbased company that sells "ripped-from-the-runway" fashion aimed at teens and college kids at stores across the United States, will open a flagship Canadian boutique across the street from Toronto's Eaton Centre mall this summer.
It hopes to follow in the steps of retailers such as Zara of Spain, the Gap Inc. unit Old Navy and H&Mof Sweden, which has made a big impact in the category since launching in 2004.

Forever 21 will open its first Canadian store this summer.
Brian Kersey, Getty Images

"We are currently looking at five Canadian markets," said Jeffrey Berkowitz, president of Aurora Realty Consultants of Montreal.
Mr. Berkowitz said an additional Ontario location will open in 2007 and a handful of outlets will follow in 2008. Forever 21, which has 390 stores in the United States and outlets in Dubai and Singapore, opened a pilot store in the West Edmonton Mall in 2001, but has not made a move to expand.
The flagship 13,000-squarefoot Toronto outlet will be in the retailer's latest store format, Mr. Berkowitz said.
The company got its start selling womenswear, but recently expanded into footwear, underwear, accessories and children's clothing. In the United States, the newer outlets are even bigger, at 30,000 to 40,000 square feet.
"They are doing very well in the States and have grown like crazy, and when you have opportunity, you have to go for it," Mr. Berkowitz said of the decision to expand. "We aim to be in all the major markets across Canada."
Like H&M, Forever 21's formula for success hinges on the quick conversion of styles from the fashion runway to the store floor. While it sources some clothing overseas, the bulk of its house-branded fashions are produced in the United States to ensure speedy production of the latest looks.
H&M has 28 stores across Canada and will likely almost double that figure, consultants estimate, by the time it finishes expansion -- Calgary and Edmonton have one store each and the retailer has yet to tackle British Columbia, the Prairies or Canada's East Coast. But Forever 21's buildout will be more modest, Mr. Berkowitz said. "We will probably be smaller than H&M; Forever 21 is going to be a bit more unique."
David Howell, apparel-market researcher and president of the consulting firm Associate Marketing International, said that strategy could serve to fuel the retailer's popularity.
"From a strategic standpoint they would serve themselves well to not [fall prey to the] 7-11 mentality where they are on every street corner," he said, noting retailer Gap Inc. has struggled due to its size and ubiquity. "That can hurt the brand because there is less mystique, less exclusivity. Kids are pretty sophisticated and while they want to wear what their peers are wearing, they do not want to wear what everyone is wearing. If it overpenetrates the market, kids lose interest quickly. It's a fine line you've got to walk."
Forever 21, which has estimated annual sales in excess of US$1-billion, got its start as Fashion 21, a boutique in Los Angeles founded in 1984 by a Korean- American couple who still own the company. Both are devout Christians, and the bottoms of the company's yellow shopping bags bear the inscription 'John 3:16,' referring to a passage in the Bible.
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  #1078  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2007, 11:49 PM
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Thats some quality reporting....they announce that the first Canadian Forever 21 will open in TOronto and that there has been a store in Edmonton since 2001 (which is still open)
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  #1079  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2007, 12:43 AM
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Thanks RyanE. I thought I was going insane for a minute there. I knew that I'd seen the store...
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  #1080  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2007, 3:32 AM
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yeah i heard of the one in edmonton

a girl in edmonton just lobves that store and since i am the one knows all the shopping news (thanks to here) she has asked me if forever 21 is ever opening here - now i can say yes
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