HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada > Manitoba & Saskatchewan

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #241  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2009, 5:36 AM
1ajs's Avatar
1ajs 1ajs is offline
ʇɥƃıuʞ -*ʞpʇ*-
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: lynn lake
Posts: 24,381
Huge Shipping Season For Churchill
CJOB News Team reporting
10/29/2009

This past shipping season was a big one for the Port of Churchill. The 529-thousand tonnes of western Canadian wheat that went through the Port... was the second highest volume since 1977. Wheat Board CEO Ian White says the board is committed to maintaining the port as a viable alternative for prairie farmers. The last ship to load... left the port this week for Europe. In total, 18 ocean vessels loaded wheat or durum at Churchill... bound for Africa, Europe, Mexico and Brazil.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #242  
Old Posted Oct 31, 2009, 8:50 PM
1ajs's Avatar
1ajs 1ajs is offline
ʇɥƃıuʞ -*ʞpʇ*-
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: lynn lake
Posts: 24,381
HudBay Re-Starts Its Chisel North Mine
CJOB's Lorne Edwards reporting
10/30/2009

HudBay Minerals says it will re-start operations at its Chisel North mine and concentrator in Snow Lake, Manitoba, immediately. The Senior Vice President of Operations Tom Goodman tells CJOB, the time is right:



The operations have been idled since the first quarter of 2009.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #243  
Old Posted Nov 8, 2009, 10:13 PM
newflyer's Avatar
newflyer newflyer is offline
Capitalist
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Calgary
Posts: 5,088
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ajs View Post
HudBay Re-Starts Its Chisel North Mine
CJOB's Lorne Edwards reporting
10/30/2009

HudBay Minerals says it will re-start operations at its Chisel North mine and concentrator in Snow Lake, Manitoba, immediately. The Senior Vice President of Operations Tom Goodman tells CJOB, the time is right:



The operations have been idled since the first quarter of 2009.
From what I hear this is huge news in Snow River, which has been slowly dying. Its great to see a community get some much needed economic injection.
__________________
Check out my city at
http://www.allwinnipeg.com **More than Ever**

Last edited by newflyer; Nov 9, 2009 at 4:46 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #244  
Old Posted Nov 9, 2009, 4:31 AM
jmt18325's Avatar
jmt18325 jmt18325 is offline
Heart of the Continent
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Winnipeg
Posts: 6,317
Snow Lake...

It was slowly dying, but now with the 2 mines reopening and a third being added, it will be fine for a while. I imagine that exploratory drilling will also restart soon, if it hasn't already.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #245  
Old Posted Nov 9, 2009, 5:26 AM
1ajs's Avatar
1ajs 1ajs is offline
ʇɥƃıuʞ -*ʞpʇ*-
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: lynn lake
Posts: 24,381
who here is from a mining town originally? i sure am
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #246  
Old Posted Nov 9, 2009, 9:43 AM
SKYSTHELIMIT SKYSTHELIMIT is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 821
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmt18325 View Post
Snow Lake...

It was slowly dying, but now with the 2 mines reopening and a third being added, it will be fine for a while. I imagine that exploratory drilling will also restart soon, if it hasn't already.
I just spent the last week up in The Pas and Flin Flon and they are saying the timing is good since the smelter in Flin is about to shut down they will be transferring the workers to the Snow Lake mine(apparently owned by the same corp)
__________________
West Coastin'
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #247  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2009, 4:31 PM
hexrae's Avatar
hexrae hexrae is offline
Armchair urbanist
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Winnipeg
Posts: 921
Waste oil refinery to open here
Will convert used motor oil into diesel fuel
One-of-a-kind facility to open in March

By: Murray McNeill

27/11/2009 1:00 AM | Comments: 0

A new, one-of-a-kind waste oil refinery is to open early next year in Manitoba that will convert used motor oil and other waste petroleum products into clean diesel fuel.

The refinery will be owned and operated by fledgling Winnipeg company HD-Petroleum. It should be up and running by next March on land adjacent to Miller Environmental Corp.'s hazardous waste facility on Highway 75, about 70 kilometres south of Winnipeg.

HD-Petroleum founder Todd Habicht told a Winnipeg conference on emerging environmental issues Thursday the plant will produce diesel fuel that is not only clean enough to burn in trucks and other vehicles, but will also generates more power, can be used at lower temperatures and has a longer storage life than conventional diesel fuel.

Habicht didn't say how much diesel fuel the refinery will produce, how much the facility will cost to build or how many people it will employ.

He said in an interview details will be announced within the next week or two.

Several oil industry officials said although there are two other refineries in Canada that re-refine used motor oil, they convert it into a new oil product, not diesel fuel. The executive director of the industry-sponsored organization that runs the province's oil recovery program -- Manitoba Association for Resource Recovery Corp. (MARRC) -- said the HD-Petroleum refinery will be a welcome development for the province.

"This is solid. This is a good thing," Ron Benson said. "Any time we can have another approved, licensed place to send our used oil, it's a good thing. And it's in Manitoba, so that's more good news."

The HD-Petroleum facility received a Dangerous Goods Handling and Transportation Act licence from the province on Sept. 10.

Benson said Manitoba produces about 16 million litres of used motor oil a year, and about 12 million of that is recycled. Some of it is used locally in the production of asphalt, some is shipped to the other two Canadian oil re-refineries, and some is shipped to the United States. "This will be one more option (for the local companies who collect and sell the used oil)," he said.

The refinery will be located about halfway between Letellier and St. Jean in the RM of Montcalm. Reeve Roger Vermette said the municipal council hasn't been told how many people will be employed at the facility.

But aside from the new jobs that are created, "just getting that (used motor oil) out of the area and turning it into usable diesel fuel is a plus," Vermette said. He said he understands a number of local trucking companies have already agreed to buy diesel fuel from the refinery, "so it should be a win-win for everyone."

Benson said although he doesn't know the scale of the project, it will be a significant operation requiring "a major amount of equipment."

Habicht said the refinery has already been assembled and tested in another province. It will be dismantled, hauled here and reassembled at the new location beginning in January.

Habicht has been working on the refinery project for the last four years. Prior to that, the Saskatoon native and entrepreneur owned and operated a number of cellphone stores in Manitoba. He said it was his inventor grandfather who came to him with the idea of building a refinery that could convert waste petroleum into diesel fuel. After researching the subject, he became convinced it was economically feasible.

murray.mcneill@freepress.mb.ca

--------------

Sounds like an interesting, and potentially lucrative, development.
__________________
[Insert profound statement here]
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #248  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2009, 2:08 AM
hexrae's Avatar
hexrae hexrae is offline
Armchair urbanist
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Winnipeg
Posts: 921
New park could generate $38M: report

By: Jennifer Pawluk

3/12/2009 3:52 PM | Comments: 2

WINNIPEG - The creation of a provincial park proposed around Fisher Bay would add $38 million to the Manitoba economy, according to a new study.

Conducted by the Centre for Indigenous Environmental Resources, the study shows current industries in the area of Fisher River Cree Nation — logging, non-aboriginal hunting and mining — generate about $2.2 million annually for Manitoba’s economy.

An industry sustained by park management as well as ecological and cultural tourism would bring in about $40 million per year, the study concluded.

An area around the bay was granted interim protection by the province as a potential park site in 1999. A study done in 2006 recommended those boundaries be expanded "according to the best ecological and cultural considerations, rather than political lines," said Ron Thiessen, executive director of Manitoba’s chapter with the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society.

The most recent study, released today, examined the prospects of that broader area.

The province is in the midst of boundary considerations and has committed to establishing the park by October of next year.

jennifer.pawluk@freepress.mb.ca
__________________
[Insert profound statement here]
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #249  
Old Posted Dec 5, 2009, 8:18 PM
1ajs's Avatar
1ajs 1ajs is offline
ʇɥƃıuʞ -*ʞpʇ*-
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: lynn lake
Posts: 24,381
Winnipeg Free Press - ONLINE EDITION
Following the money

Let's see who got what from the federal recession-busting effort

By: Mia Rabson
5/12/2009 8:40 AM | Comments: 2



OTTAWA -- The home riding of Manitoba's senior cabinet minister appears to be the big winner in Canada's economic stimulus spending in Mani­toba.
A Winnipeg Free Press analysis of the federal government's Economic Action Plan in the province shows more than $1.25 billion is being spent on stimulus projects in the province, everything from new roads and sewers to playgrounds, arenas, federal laboratories and university buildings.
Money is flowing in some form to all 14 ridings, but one riding sticks out when it comes to community-level projects like recreation centres and road improvements.
Looking at five stimulus pro­grams where the projects are mostly beneficial to the local community, Conservative MP and Treasury Board President Vic Toews's riding of Pro­vencher is the big winner.
Ottawa has announced 34 projects in his riding with a total spending com­mitment from all sources of $142 million. The federal com­mitment is $64.5 million, nearly twice the amount pledged in the runner-up. That is fellow Tory Merv Tweed's riding of Brandon-Souris with 29 projects and $35.1 million in federal funding.
The five programs included are the Infrastructure Stimulus Fund, Recreational Infrastructure Canada, the Communities Component, the Community Adjustment Fund and Cultural Spaces.
Other spending programs, such as those targeting infra­structure at colleges and universities, federal buildings, federal laboratories and national historic sites are included in the overall figures for Manitoba but were left out of the riding-by-riding comparison because most of the projects in those programs are not meant to benefit the local com­munity alone.
Not every riding has a college or university or a national historic site, for example, and repairs and upgrades at such locations benefit not just the home riding.
As of Dec. 1, stimulus spending in Manitoba from all levels including federal, provincial and municipal govern­ments and not-for-profit agencies, exceeds $1.25 billion for more than 300 projects. Ottawa's commitment thus far is in excess of $421.6 million.
Most of the money is being spent this year and next.
Finance Minister Jim Flaherty announced Wednesday in Winnipeg that 97 per cent of the stimulus funds are now committed.
Winnipeg NDP MP Pat Martin said it is "entirely too predictable" that the senior minister's riding is getting the most money.
But Toews's spokeswoman, Christine Csversko, said it's a "misrepresentation" to present Provencher as receiving so much more than other ridings.
"The joint decisions made by the federal and provincial governments regarding the approval of infrastructure projects (are) made on the basis of geographical location, merit, need and depending on the program, readiness to proceed," she said.
More than 80 per cent of the funds heading to Proven­cher come from the Infrastructure Stimulus Fund, the $4-billion marquee program of the government's Economic Action Plan. Projects there include the two biggest-ticket items funded under the ISF in Manitoba -- a $60-million overhaul of the Trans-Canada highway between Winnipeg and the Steinbach turnoff at Highway 12 and a $35-million rebuild of the Letellier Bridge.
Ottawa is picking up half the tab for both those projects and Manitoba is footing the other half.
Csversko said projects like the Trans-Canada reconstruc­tion are like universities in that they do not just benefit residents in Toews's riding but anyone who uses the road.
The Letellier Bridge, crossing the Red River on High­way 201, is more than 55 years old and in 1996, engineers predicted it had at most a decade left in its lifespan. There have been weight restrictions and single-lane traffic al­lowances on the bridge for nearly five years now. It was set to be rebuilt in 1999 by the former Tory government in Manitoba -- in which Toews was a cabinet minister. But the NDP shelved the project when it took power that year.
While Toews's riding is receiving the most, there is no indication that only Conservative ridings benefited. Four Conservative ridings, all in Winnipeg, and including the riding of junior cabinet minister Steven Fletcher, are at or near the bottom of the pack and received less than $10 mil­lion from Ottawa for projects in those five local programs.
Conservative MP Rod Bruinooge's riding in Winnipeg South is receiving the least amount from those five pro­grams. In total, Winnipeg South has five projects with a total price tag of $2.4 million. Ottawa has committed $695,000.
Bruinooge recently got to announce $54.7 million for the Waverley West arterial road construction, of which $18.2 million is coming from Ottawa.
That funding is from Ottawa's Building Canada fund, a program announced before the stimulus package. Some of the funds are being fast-tracked to aid economic recovery.
Manitoba's lone Liberal MP, Anita Neville, in Winnipeg South Centre, is second-last with $3.4 million for nine projects. Ottawa has pledged to spend $1.3 million in her riding.
"I'm disappointed," she said.
Neville said she has heard grumbling that too much money was flowing into Provencher.
"We have people coming to us for help with grant appli­cations saying they may not bother because all the money is going there," she said.
Infrastructure Minister John Baird has insisted for months the stimulus programs were not being delivered on a riding-by-riding basis. Most of the programs are decided in negotiations with the provincial government. Some, such as the recreational program, required community clubs seeking money to apply directly.
The NDP's Martin believes that latter detail is likely one of the reasons community clubs in his riding haven't received any money from the Recreational Infrastructure Canada (RInC) money.
Martin's riding hadn't received any money under RInC until Friday, when, late in the day, Ottawa announced it was contributing $500,000 to the city's $5.6-million redevelopment of Central Park. The city approved the pro­ject in June 2008 but hadn't secured all the financing yet.
With Friday's announcement, Neville's riding is the only one without any RInC funding so far.
Martin welcomed the investment and said he's pleased the Central Park overhaul can proceed.
But he said his riding, which is the poorest in Canada according to Statistics Canada's measure of median family incomes, is in great need and more stimulus funding could have been a huge boon.
"The inner city is crying out for more green space and recreation facilities," said Martin. "The suburbs are doing just fine, it's the core area that needs a whack of catch-up money for recreation facilities."
Martin said while he doubts there is really much polit­ical interference at play in stimulus money, he thinks in the government's "zeal" to get the money out the door, it missed opportunities to do more with the infrastructure money than just give it to the people who got their applica­tions in first. He said it's difficult for inner-city rec pro­grams to compete with the parental involve­ment and volunteers available in wealthy suburbs.
"It's like it's stacked against the inner city," said Martin.
He also said with the government al­ready promising lean years ahead to get the $56-billion deficit under control, it is go­ing to be a very long time before any more money is going to flow again, meaning if you didn't get money now, you won't for several more years.
Martin said for a government that wants to get "tough on crime," providing more recreational opportunities in troubled neighbourhoods is as beneficial as any plan to throw youths in jail. Gary Grouette, president of the Freight House Community Centre on Isabel Street, said his main aim is to keep kids off the street. He hasn't applied for any grant money from Ottawa yet, mainly because most of his time is spent trying to keep the club's doors open.
"We don't have any support from the parents here," he said.
The club could benefit from new bathrooms and new doors, he said.
Fletcher, whose riding also didn't get any money from RInC, said Martin's riding hasn't been totally left out.
He noted the area just got an $8.8-million overhaul of the Cindy Klassen Recreation Centre, formerly the Sargent Park Recreation Complex.
"I would encourage one to look at the big picture over time," said Fletcher.
He also pointed out, in Martin's riding, a $5-million re­furbishment of the Manitoba Centennial Centre, a $10-mil­lion new United Way headquarters, and $9.5 million to expand the Manitoba Children's Museum.
In the analysis of all five community-level programs, Winnipeg Centre ranks sixth out of the 14 ridings in terms of dollars spent ($46.8 million) and seventh in terms of federal dollars ($13.5 million) and number of projects (18).
Fletcher's riding has only four projects approved among the five community-level programs, with a grand total of $5.9 million and a federal investment of $2.5 million.
Fletcher, however, points out his riding saw a number of large projects under different programs such as the provincial/territorial base fund. They include the $140-mil­lion CentrePort project at the Richardson International Airport, the $25-million True North Mooseplex and an $11.3-million twinning of the Trans-Canada Highway through Headingley.
He said those projects weren't approved just because they're in his riding, but because they were good projects with big benefits to the economy.
Fletcher said picking here and there at projects, looking to see if someone got more than another, is not valuable.
"The action plan as a whole is not about micro items but the macro picture," he said. "We were facing a once-in -a-century financial crisis that is worldwide, and we did everything governments can do to ensure the country not only would survive, but would prosper."
mia.rabson@freepress.mb.ca

Manitoba Projects

Click here for a list of infrastructure projects in Manitoba, as compiled by the Winnipeg Free Press using the federal government’s online map and press releases.
The government has not provided a list of projects in each program, as requested, so some information may be missing.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #250  
Old Posted Dec 7, 2009, 6:44 AM
jayrod19 jayrod19 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 21
Development ideas for Weyburn, Sask.

The city has a couple of vacant lots that just became available and i just wanted to see what you people of larger cities think of what would be a good development in these spaces.

Here is some general information about Weyburn
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weyburn

and links to maps of vacant lots.
They tore this feed mill down in winter/spring
Feed Mill lot

The old Souris Valley Mental Hospital grounds. The site is just about cleaned up now. Just some information about this area, the 3 story building right beside the hospital is a Saskpower training facility, the two story building just to the east is the current mental hospital, and the large building a little bit southeast of the hospital is a long-term healthcare facility. The city does have a firm working on site plans.
Souris Valley grounds

and this one has been vacant for a long long time or never developed. There is a 2020 plan for along the river, I believe they want some kind of outdoor market area here.
riverfront

For the souris valley grounds, the college has talked about getting out of the high school renovation project and build a brand new campus, possibly with residency. So that could probably go out there since there is that saskpower training place. The college will have to move their classes anyway for the big $20 million renovation project for the high school.

I think some nice looking condos for along the river would be nice and inviting to the city but i think the trains would be too loud for people living there.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #251  
Old Posted Dec 11, 2009, 7:47 PM
1ajs's Avatar
1ajs 1ajs is offline
ʇɥƃıuʞ -*ʞpʇ*-
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: lynn lake
Posts: 24,381
Dauphin college expansion begins

By: Staff Writer
11/12/2009 10:33 AM | Comments: 0

A $3.5-million expansion to Assiniboine Community College's Parkland campus in Dauphin kicked off today.
Agriculture Minister Stan Struthers said Ottawa is matching provincial funding with more than $1.7 million under its Knowledge Infrastructure Program. Assiniboine Community College (ACC) will cover the remaining costs.
The project will see a 7,200-square-foot addition to house a nursing arts laboratory, a larger early-learning centre and additional classrooms for community programming.
It will allow ACC to train more trades apprentices and licensed practical nurses.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #252  
Old Posted Dec 11, 2009, 7:47 PM
1ajs's Avatar
1ajs 1ajs is offline
ʇɥƃıuʞ -*ʞpʇ*-
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: lynn lake
Posts: 24,381
MMF upgrading rental properties

By: Staff Writer
11/12/2009 11:52 AM | Comments: 0

WINNIPEG — The Manitoba Metis Federation will renovate and upgrade 645 aging public-housing units in rural, northern and remote Manitoba communities under a new agreement with the province.
The provincial government is providing $4.3 million to Community Housing Managers of Manitoba, a housing organization run by the MMF, to carry out the work.
The investment is expected to create 51 full-time jobs.
city.desk@freepress.mb.ca
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #253  
Old Posted Dec 15, 2009, 8:43 PM
1ajs's Avatar
1ajs 1ajs is offline
ʇɥƃıuʞ -*ʞpʇ*-
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: lynn lake
Posts: 24,381
Province, feds boost Pine Falls training school

By: Staff Writer
15/12/2009 12:58 PM | Comments: 0

[IMG]http://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/578*358/1712116.jpg[/IMG] Enlarge Image
The Tembec paper mill in Pine Falls.


WINNIPEG - The federal and provincial governments are pouring money into a trades training school in Pine Falls, a community that’s been hard hit by a lockout at its paper mill.
The Winnipeg River Learning Centre will receive $2.7 million from Ottawa and $600,000 from the province to retrofit and upgrade its facilities and develop new training programs.


"Over the next two years, this will be used to develop curriculum, to purchase training equipment and provide programming to upscale and rescale the workforce," provincial Entrepreneurship, Training and Trade Minister Peter Bjornson said in an interview.
Employees at Tembec’s Pine Falls paper mill have been locked out for more than three months. The company has announced its intention to sell the business, which it says it will mothball if a buyer cannot be found.
Bjornson said the trades school upgrade is not targeting Tembec employees per se. New programs contemplated for the learning centre include training for electricians and licensed practical nurses, he said.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #254  
Old Posted Dec 25, 2009, 12:00 PM
JayM's Avatar
JayM JayM is offline
Youth of a Nation
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba
Posts: 1,196
Thompson, Manitoba

Apartment vacancy rate decreases slightly, condo sales remain tough challenge
John Barker editor@thompsoncitizen.net
December 23, 2009

In its closely-watche
d biannual survey, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) reports the vacancy rate for rental apartments in Thompson, included in its fall survey, completed in October and released Dec. 16, was 0.1 per cent.

That means the rental market for apartments is still incredibly tight in Thompson with 0.1 per cent marking a slight decline in availability from the spring Rental Market Survey last April when the vacancy rate was 0.2 per cent. However, it is a slight improvement over last fall in October 2008 when the vacancy rate was zero, meaning no rental apartments were to be found officially at any size or at any price. In April 2008 the vacancy rate was 0.2 per cent in the CMHC spring survey.
- -


What the CMHC survey doesn't fully capture, local rental experts say, is a shift in the marketplace over the last couple of years from low-end poorly maintained apartment units to landlords doing major upgrades and renovations to tap into a previously under-serviced higher-end rental market.

Employees from several well-paying outfits in town, including the BRHA and Vale Inco, now have a viable option to rent as tenants rather than buying a home, which would have been their only option two years ago, local rentals experts say. There were recently 80 homes on the market and listed for sale in Thompson.

At the same time, the upmarket move in rentals has decreased the supply of affordable housing available. City council voted unanimously Nov. 16 to establish the Thompson Housing Authority, signaling it intends to get directly involved officially for the first time on an ongoing basis in affordable housing issues municipally.
- -


CMHC defines affordable housing as that which consumes less than 30 per cent of before-tax household income (rent or principal, interest and taxes).

The distinction between social housing and affordable housing, although the two terms are often conflated and used interchangeably, is that social housing is not self-sustaining economically and can't be supplied by the private sector with a reasonable expectation of return on investment.

Without ongoing public sector support social housing is not sustainable. Another distinction between social housing and affordable housing is that social housing has entry qualifications restricting access, while affordable housing is open to all residents and is considered economically sustainable and can be supplied by the private sector either in partnership with the public sector or independently.
- -


Rental units above $1,105 per month are not subject to provincial rent control and landlords are free to the rent at whatever the market will bear.

Yellowknife developer Tony Chang's 120-unit Grey Wolf Bay Townhouses, which have undergone millions in renovations since late 2007, has dramatically moved upmarket through the upgrades. Princeton Towers was also extensively renovated in 2007 by Sheiner Group, a Montréal-based real estate investment firm specializing in the acquisition and development of commercial, residential and retirement lifestyle communities in Canada and the U.S. controlled by Lloyd Sheiner, and Silver Management Group Limited, an Ottawa-based residential and commercial property management company with numerous properties, mostly in Ottawa and Sault-Ste. Marie, Ont.

Sheiner and Silver sold Princeton Towers to Winnipeg lawyer Ken Carroll and Winnipeg realtor Russ Knight's Polar Bear Properties Ltd. on March 30 for $14.75 million. Princeton Towers is trying to convert many of its 275 rental apartments to condo ownership. To date it has sold 10 condominiums.

Princeton Towers, two nine-storey buildings on Princeton Drive, comprising the North Tower and South Tower, which opened for occupancy in September 1971, sporting an indoor pool and sauna and originally built to house executives who wanted the best amenities and the best views of Thompson from their balconies, attached to every unit, has been designated for use as condominiums since 1991, says, Gary Ceppetelli, the city's director of planning and community development.

Also, up to 16 of the 133 yellow-clad Corayana apartments on Copper and Nickel roads, owned through Corayana Enterprises Ltd. by Southern Ontario businessman Arkadi Neiman and other investors, may eventually become condominiums known as Riverside Court in a test-marketing venture, but there have been no buyers to date.

Melanie Bekevich, the onsite manager at Riverside Court, says, "We have a major process to undergo to obtain subdivision of the units for condominium use. We own seven buildings and we can't put rentals and condos on the same title. So we first have to subdivide the buildings, since some are now going to be executive rentals. The surveyors have already been here and we're working on the final design for submission to the city. After the city approves the subdivision of the buildings, then we can begin subdividing the units.

Bekevich says while they've had "contracts in place with several people in Thompson" for condo purchases "obtaining financing has been a big challenge. As a result we've begun to look at rent-to-own programs, which we've had a lot of interest in."

A one-bedroom Riverside Court condo starts at $139,900.

Bekevich says while open houses have been well attended "the global economic crisis compounded by a local slowdown in the real estate market has shaken people's confidence. This has impacted the real estate market across the board, not just with condo sales." She says on the rental side "the market has shown a significant demand for quality apartments, and the critical mass for condos is developing." One building has been "opened for executive rentals, and another one slated for Feb. 1" and that is also full.

RE/MAX Thompson sale associate Tana McCartney says she has not heard anything on the Legacy Condominiums project planned for the corner of Wekusko Street and Arctic Drive in Burntwood "in quite some time … [neither] I, nor anyone in our office has seen anything come in nor have they contacted me to go further in marketing or selling this project. I think the condos would be fantastic if it does happen!"

Dennis Fenske's DDAK Developments Inc. has built an eight-unit apartment building, which is fully rented, and earlier this year advertised the building of condos in a second building on Centennial Drive near Thompson Drive South and Maple Street, but only the apartment rental part of the project has proceeded to date.

Fenske said Dec. 21 he still hopes the condo portion of the project will go ahead, but says it is unknown what size it will be if it does proceed.

An agreement between the City of Thompson and Winn-Can Properties Ltd. to build about 110 new homes in the Burntwood South subdivision by the end of 2011 has not a single unit of housing has been built since the deal was struck with the developer on June 23, 2008.

Winn-Can Properties Ltd. is comprised of a Winnipeg group of investors, working in conjunction with Schickedanz West, a division of Calgary-based Schickedanz Bros. Construction, to build 96 multi-family units, priced around $200,000 per unit, as fourplexes, which could possibly be sold as condos, in the MacMaster Bay area of the Burntwood South subdivision.

In each of 2009, 2010 and 2011, Winn-Can was to develop and offer for sale no fewer than 30 serviced lots, houses or townhouses under the deal.

The development was to proceed in three phases starting with the single family detached homes on 19 lots on the portion of Smith Crescent west of Campbell Drive. In Phase 2, Winn-Can was to receive an option to develop Hambly Crescent and Smith Crescent west of Campbell Drive in a configuration to be determined by the City of Thompson.

Based on market demand in June 2008, the agreement was originally touted as leading to the development possibly of more than 300 homes in the subdivision by Winn-Can.

The CMHC completes its twice a year survey with snapshots of local conditions and typically the spring report is released in early June and the October report in early December.

The average monthly rent for a two-bedroom apartment in Thompson in October was $666 compared to $639 last April.

Thompson had a total of 1,591 rental apartments, according to the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, as of October 2008. They included 55 bachelor units, 654 one-bedroom apartments, 855 two-bedroom apartments and 27 three-bedroom or more units.

Despite the push by several landlords into the condo field, the total number of rental apartments in Thompson, perhaps surprisingly, actually increased slightly by 32 to 1,623 this past October compared to 1,591 a year earlier, says Jeff Powell, senior market analyst for CHMC's Market Analysis Centre Prairie and Territories Region in Winnipeg.

For the purposes of CMHC's Rental Market Survey, a rental unit is considered available if the unit is vacant, or the existing tenant has given or received official notice to move and a new tenant has not signed a lease.

CMHC takes rental apartments undergoing renovations temporarily out of the apartment rental inventory and returns them to its list when tenants are back in them.

CMHC also does not count in its survey new apartment rental units constructed less than six months ago.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #255  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2010, 7:55 AM
JayM's Avatar
JayM JayM is offline
Youth of a Nation
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba
Posts: 1,196
Gods Lake Narrows, Manitoba

deleted.

Last edited by JayM; Jan 5, 2010 at 2:44 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #256  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2010, 8:14 AM
JayM's Avatar
JayM JayM is offline
Youth of a Nation
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba
Posts: 1,196
deleted.

Last edited by JayM; Jan 5, 2010 at 2:43 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #257  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2010, 4:57 PM
RTD RTD is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 867
JayM, this is a thread about construction and economic development, not native murders and other issues. Can you please remove you previous two posts and place them in the "First Nation Issues" thread, which is more appropriate for those stories. Let's try and keep things organized around here!

Thanks!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #258  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2010, 10:23 AM
1ajs's Avatar
1ajs 1ajs is offline
ʇɥƃıuʞ -*ʞpʇ*-
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: lynn lake
Posts: 24,381
Too much grog for Gimli's viking?

Big Icelandic icon starting to lean

By: Bill Redekop
18/01/2010 1:00 AM | Comments: 0
GIMLI -- The famous viking is turning into the Leaning Thor of Gimli.Town officials recently discovered that the giant viking statue, which symbolizes the area's Icelandic heritage, is listing.
You can't tell from the front, but if looked at from the back, it is definitely leaning to the left, or south.
Coun. Bill Barlow noticed it on a health walk. He thought at first it might just be his perception -- some say he leans left politically. But on subsequent walks, Barlow became convinced.
The tilt came as a surprise. The base seems to be level, it's just the guy standing on it that's wilting, as if he's had too much grog.
The statue was moved once in 1988 to make way for the Betel Personal Care Home. It stands on 2nd Avenue along Gimli's Harbourfront.
When word got out that the famous statue was listing, offers of help started to rain in. The statue was sculpted by Giorgio Barone in 1967. The sculptor's son, in the movie business, was in an airport on his way from Vancouver to Los Angeles when he got word about his dad's statue.
He immediately phoned the Gimli town office, saying he was prepared to spearhead a fundraising campaign to restore the stocky viking. The town declined the offer. Others phoned wanting to sculpt a new statue.
The town hired a structural engineer to take a look. The engineer wasn't too concerned about the leaning -- the statue isn't going to fall over and kill someone -- but is worried about the condition of the big guy's fibreglass exterior.
Paint is chipping and moisture is getting under the fibreglass, and Manitoba's freeze-thaw cycles will make it worse. If not patched up, the town might have to build a new statue in a few years at a cost of about $150,000.
The town is taking tenders on repairing the viking's exterior.
bill.redekop@freepress.mb.ca
Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition January 18, 2010 A5
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #259  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2010, 10:27 AM
1ajs's Avatar
1ajs 1ajs is offline
ʇɥƃıuʞ -*ʞpʇ*-
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: lynn lake
Posts: 24,381
Sewer, water dispute splits small village

System key to development: reeve

By: Bill Redekop / Open Road
18/01/2010 1:00 AM | Comments: 0
[IMG]http://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/240*184/1809264.jpg[/IMG] Enlarge Image
KEN GIGLIOTTI / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS Elma�s Ukrainian Catholic Church, which has no running water and uses an outhouse (far right), opposes new system.

[IMG]http://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/240*327/1809265.jpg[/IMG] Enlarge Image
KEN GIGLIOTTI / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS Leonard John Garowey is among residents objecting to the cost.


It may be the most expensive sewer and water system per capita ever planned in Manitoba, costing up to $34,000 for some residents -- or $64,000 amortized over 20 years.That prompted holders of 56 land titles in the village of Elma -- a 45-minute drive east of Winnipeg -- to register their opposition at a Dec. 15 municipal council meeting. Even Father Jose Montepegue showed up. There is no longer a Roman Cat-holic church in Elma but the church would still have to pay $15,000 for its cemetery. Fr. Montepegue said his parishioners in the cemetery don't need a washroom.
The still-open Ukrainian Catholic Church in Elma, which has no running water, just an outhouse, is also opposed.
But while opposing property owners of 56 land titles -- some own more than one parcel -- make up more than half the 96 land titles in Elma, it wasn't enough. A two-thirds majority (64) was required to defeat the local improvement plan.
"I can't pay $34,000 to flush the toilet," said Tom Slymkevich, who uses well water and a septic field like most residents. "It's not that I'm against a new water and sewer system. I just can't afford it."
The high cost per resident is a problem when trying to upgrade water and waste systems in small communities, said Glenn Malkoske, reeve of the RM of Whitemouth that includes Elma. The new system will cost about $4 million, shared equally by the province, Ottawa and the RM. The cost to a typical homeowner with one lot is $23,000, or $43,000 amortized over 20 years on a property tax bill.
But Elma residents have been under a boil water advisory for almost a decade. Sewage is also leaking into ditches and the Whitemouth River that runs past the town, Malkoske said.
"We could be running into problems with Manitoba Conservation with the septic fields in town. I don't think it's a situation it's going to tolerate for long," he said.
"It certainly holds up development," said Malkoske about a lack of a modern sewer and water system in Elma, at the junction of Highways 15 and 11. "It's a nice community along the banks of Whitemouth River. It has all kinds of opportunities, but with no infrastructure, the chance of economic development is non-existent."
It's a low-pressure septic system, meaning that while grey water collects in a lagoon outside town, solids will still go to homeowner septic tanks. That means existing tanks will all be inspected and many will have to be replaced because of leaks or because they do not fit requirements of the modern system. That will cost homeowners another $5,000, Malkoske conceded.
The planned waste and water system has strong supporters, too. However, the issue has torn the community.
"It was a nice friendly community. Now certain people don't talk to you," said Slymkevich.
He also questioned the vote. The RM has three properties in town, and the RM dismissed the request of the family of a man who died recently and who owned four lots. The family requested his four lots be registered as opposing the project.
Residents have begun a letter-writing campaign to the provincial Municipal Board asking for a public hearing.
A hearing is automatically triggered if 25 or more taxpayers write a letter objecting to third reading of the plan.
bill.redekop@freepress.mb.ca
Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition January 18, 2010 A3
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #260  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2010, 6:05 AM
1ajs's Avatar
1ajs 1ajs is offline
ʇɥƃıuʞ -*ʞpʇ*-
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: lynn lake
Posts: 24,381
Supreme Won't Hear Wheat Board Case

1/21/2010

The Supreme Court announced Thursday it won't hear a Canadian Wheat Board case against a federally imposed gag order. The Federal government has been preventing the Board from using money to promote the single-desk selling system. While the Wheat Board initially won a challenge in a Federal court, the decision was overturned on appeal. Prime Minister Harper is on record as wanting to eliminate the Wheat Board's monopoly.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada > Manitoba & Saskatchewan
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 3:00 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.