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  #41  
Old Posted May 7, 2018, 10:19 AM
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They should go here.
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  #42  
Old Posted May 13, 2018, 9:45 PM
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Well if we're all on board to keep this thread going I've got a few projects I've come across here a couple interesting new ones. The history of Japanese in Metro Detroit is actually a pretty interesting story, according to Wikipidea..


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Histor..._Metro_Detroit

Quote:
The first Japanese people came to Detroit in 1892. There were no particular waves of immigration.

However, after World War II ended and the Japanese internment camps were disbanded, the first significant wave of those with Japanese origins came to Metro Detroit,with many coming from California. By 1951 there were about 900 Japanese in Detroit. A concentration of Japanese existed in Highland Park and others were throughout the city of Detroit.

...

By the mid-1980s, anti-Japanese sentiment in Detroit had decreased. The level had especially decreased among young working age people. Leaders in government and business had toned down remarks regarding Japan. Japanese cars became increasingly common in Detroit, including within blue collar communities. In 1991 Sharon Cohen of the Associated Press wrote that anti-Japanese sentiment had largely decreased from 1981 and American automobile industry trade union members were working for Japanese companies. She added that "Japan-bashing" still occurred in Metro Detroit, with politicians and Iacocca making public statements against the Japanese automobile industry.

In a ten-year period ending in 1992, the Japanese population in Metro Detroit had tripled. Sharon Cohen wrote in a 1991 Associated Press article that "The Japanese community [in all of Michigan] is tiny and transient: estimates range from 6,000 to 8,000." In 1990, there were 3,500 Japanese expatriates in Metro Detroit.In 1992 there were about 5,000 Japanese nationals in Metro Detroit and there were estimates of up to 270 Japanese companies there. By 1990, Chrysler was purchasing steel from Mitsui which had an office in Southfield. By 1990, since the number of Japanese companies with Detroit branches had increased to almost 300, with most of them related to the automobile industry, major accounting firms including the "Big Six" hired Japanese employees and catered to the new Japanese business populations. For the same reason Dickinson, Wright, Moon, Van Dusen & Freeman, one of the largest law firms in Detroit, hired Japanese employees. Area hospitals began catering to Japanese patients. A hotel in Novi, the Sheraton Oaks, hired a "director of Japan marketing". By 1990, the Saturday Japanese school operated in three locations.

In the 1990s, several Japanese automobile firms had opened offices along M-14. Nissan Motor Co. opened its Farmington Hills office in November 1991. In addition, Toyota established a technical center in Ann Arbor. In 1993 the Consulate-General of Japan, Detroit, was established partly due to an increase in the numbers of Japanese businesses and residents in the states of Michigan and Ohio. In 1996, 4,084 Japanese nationals lived in Metro Detroit. By 1997, the number of Japanese nationals in Metro Detroit was 4,132. In 1999, the majority of the 8,100 Japanese in Michigan lived in a corridor in southwestern Oakland County along Interstate 696 consisting of Farmington Hills, Novi, and West Bloomfield.
There's actually a house in my neighborhood here in FH that was owned by some Japanese company fitted out for families who were transferred to the area.


Quote:
Retail, residential plan targets Asian population

Aikens' Novi plan would turn 15 acres south of Twelve Oaks into 'Asian Village'

By SHERRI WELCH
Crain's Detroit Business
May 13, 2018

-A $50 million-$60 million, mixed-use "Asian Village" is taking shape in Novi
-Project will give Japanese, other Asian residents a place to gather and shop for specialty items
-Also expected to be a destination for others in the region



Oakland County's Novi area is home to the largest Japanese population in Michigan, and as a whole, the state is home to the second-largest Japanese population in the Midwest.

But up until now, there hasn't been a dedicated retail, restaurant and entertainment area for Japanese and other Asian populations.

Quote:
The city of Novi last week approved the $3.15 million sale of just less than 10 acres of land it assembled for the project to Sakura Novi LLC, an affiliate of Birmingham-based developer Robert B. Aikens & Associates LLC. The deal is contingent on creation of a brownfield plan and approval of a Planned Rezoning Overlay plan from the city.

The area slated for the "Asian Village" project is bounded by Grand River Avenue to the south, Town Center Drive to the west and 11 Mile Road to the north. Only a few miles from Novi's Twelve Oaks Mall, the site is zoned for office, service, commercial and light industrial.

Anchored by a new market/food hall concept by One World Market, the pocket Asian Village will span about 15 acres and include 75,000 square feet of lifestyle retail, with lifestyle services, such as exercise facilities and salons and soft goods stores, Japanese, Korean and Chinese restaurants and entertainment such as a Japanese karaoke bar.

Apartments and townhomes and possibly 15,000 square feet of office space are also part of the project.

Those developments would be nestled into a walkable, open-air retail development wrapped around a four-acre lake with Japanese gardens, a walking path and pavilion area surrounding the lake.
http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article...ian-population


Quote:
Mahindra makes giant leap into Detroit area

By Anisa Jibrell
Automotive News
May 13, 2018

-Investing $230 million in three Detroit-area operations in Pontiac, Troy and Auburn Hills
-Strategy embraces an area shunned for new plants in recent decades
-Sees the advantages in metro Detroit critical mass of engineering resources



For the past 30 years, new competitors have shunned Detroit as a manufacturing site. The last non-Detroit 3 automaker to open an assembly plant in the Detroit area was Mazda in 1987, in a product-sharing deal with its then-part owner, Ford Motor Co.

Quote:
By itself, the 150,000-square-foot vehicle plant represents a modest investment of $22 million. But Mahindra, a Mumbai, India, industrial conglomerate with annual sales of approximately $19 billion, has bigger visions for Detroit.

The plant will begin building the Roxor, a retro off-road-only vehicle similar to a Willys Jeep. But Mahindra is also one of five manufacturers in the running for a $6 billion contract to design and produce mail carrier vehicles for the U.S. Postal Service. And longer term, Mahindra officials said they want to make use of their new Detroit engineering, manufacturing and supply chain facilities to develop other vehicles for the U.S. market.

The company said additional projects in the pipeline will generate approximately 400 more jobs and an additional $600 million in local investment.
http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article...o-detroit-area
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Last edited by Docta_Love; Jun 22, 2018 at 5:21 PM.
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  #43  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 8:31 PM
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Quote:
Metro Detroit home buyers face lower inventory, higher prices

By TYLER CLIFFORD
Crain's Detroit Business
June 14, 2018

-A 23 percent decrease in listings helped drive metro Detroit's median sales price up 8 percent
-Buyers are lining up as soon as homes hit the market
-Realtors cannot predict when the trends may change

The competitive market is being driven by a growing demand for homes and a metro Detroit inventory that is down by 23 percent compared to the same time a year ago. Fueled by a low unemployment rate and an economy that has proven to be formidable in recent years, buyers and Realtors alike are running into challenges.

While Detroit saw inventory drop about 4 percent in the past year, Oakland, Livingston and Wayne counties have seen listings drop by about 20 percent. Macomb's decline reached 30 percent.

"The low inventory is insane right now, it's unbelievable," said Wilson, who also focuses on the Royal Oak and Ferndale areas. "They are letting people bid on a house to the point where they may not even appraise. At this very moment, it has begun to get a little frustrating."

Realcomp CEO Karen Kage is surprised that the total number of home sales has stayed steady despite the steep decline in on-market listings in each county.

"Days on market continues to drop, which is another telling sign. When these houses hit the market, it has a line out the door," she said. "We don't want to get into the same position we were in 10 years ago when prices went up, up and up."

Some sellers are hesitant to put their homes on the market because they worry about being able to purchase another home, which also strains the market, Kage said. Until more homes can be built, it is unclear how long the low inventory and high demand trends will continue to affect the market, she said.
http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article...-higher-prices


Quote:
Michigan State Fair grows indoors in expanded Showplace in Novi

By ANNALISE FRANK
Crain's Detroit Business
June 13, 2018

-180,000-square-foot Novi venue to finish expansion in August
-Fair to grow, set up carnival rides indoors
-Expansion construction costs estimated at $12 million-$13 million


NEW FEATURES
New features of the Suburban Collection Showplace expansion include:

-14 more meeting and banquet rooms
-mezzanine/upper-level viewing area
-new parking and outdoor event areas
-90,000-square-foot event center, contiguous to existing space
-16,000 square feet of upper and lower level side space



Quote:
Michigan State Fair LLC will bring carnival rides indoors this year as its now roomier venue, the Suburban Collection Showplace, completes an expansion costing more than $10 million.

The Novi exhibition center expects work on an additional 180,000 feet of event space to finish ahead of the Aug. 30-Sept. 3 agriculture event and festival.

With 20 percent greater indoor capacity, the state fair is substantially changing its layout and traffic flow this year, said Steve Masters, the fair's executive director. With more attractions indoors and with air conditioning, it'll now be less dependent on ever-changing Michigan weather, he said. The event lost a substantial amount of traffic one day last year due to rain and thunderstorms.

Forty-foot ceilings in a new column-free, 70,000-square-foot event hall will allow the state fair to bring rides indoors for the first time. The number of rides to be installed this year isn't yet set, but Masters said he expects to set up around 10 indoors — such as giant slides and a merry-go-round, for example, not a giant ferris wheel. The fair had 55 total rides last year.

State fair officials anticipates a 10 percent increase in attendance over last year's 151,000, Masters said. The total cost of the event won't be available until afterward, he said, and last year's figure wasn't immediately available.

Sponsor Ram Truck, a division of Fiat Chrysler, is in year two of a three-year presenting sponsorship agreement while The Kroger Co. returns as a major sponsor. New this year is Three Chord Bourbon, which will sponsor the beer garden.
http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article...wplace-in-novi


Quote:
Singh Development breaks ground on $65 million project at prime Royal Oak site

By TYLER CLIFFORD
Crain's Detroit Business
June 12, 2018

-West Bloomfield-based developer closes on deal for 4 acres for $2.5 million
-It expects to start to build 250,000-square-foot project this summer
-Development includes 245 residences and 10,000 square feet of retail


Quote:
Singh Development Co. LP on Monday began construction of a $65 million mixed-use complex on more than 4 acres of vacant land at the south end of Royal Oak, Project Manager Avi Grewal said Wednesday.

The West Bloomfield-based developer closed on the $2.5 million sale of the property at Main Street, Woodward Avenue and I-696 on Friday, the Downtown Development Authority announced Tuesday. The deal had been in the works for two years to build housing there — the last piece in the puzzle for the city's DDA.

The Griffin will bring 240,000 square feet of residential and 10,000 square feet of retail space to the site that has been vacant for more than three decades.

Singh's construction crew will build 245 units, up from 225 as previously announced, that range from one- to three-bedroom apartments. The developer said it will cater to young professionals to empty nesters living an active lifestyle.

Residences would range from 550 to 1,800 square feet, according to the DDA. Homes will lease for between $1,500 to $3,000 a month, Grewal said. Barring a challenge with Michigan's labor shortage, he predicts that the first units will be ready in 2020.
http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article...at-prime-royal
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  #44  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 4:30 PM
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Ford's announcement to renovate Michigan Central Depot came with a broader vision to weave together its main Dearborn Campus with its new Corktown campus & this effort will be tied into other mobility research centers along the Michigan Ave corridor out to Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor. A Detroit version of Sand Hill Road is what Bill Ford said he wanted to create and this is already having a knock on effect along Michigan Ave in cities that aren't thought of having a big Ford influence this project in downtown Westland is a good example.


Quote:
Blighted Eloise psych hospital in Westland to see new life

By KURT NAGL
Crain's Detroit Business
June 21, 2018

-Property sold to Morgan Development for $1
-Developer contractually obligated to invest $20 million
-Blighted structures to be removed


Quote:
Wayne County Commissioners approved Thursday the sale of the Eloise Hospital Complex — a sprawling, 28 acre property near Michigan Avenue and Merriman Road that it purchased in the late 1800s.

The developer, Southfield-based Morgan Development, purchased the entire property for $1 and the contractual promise to invest at least $20 million into it, starting within 18 months and completing within 42 months, said Khalil Rahal, assistant county executive for Wayne County.

Plans are for the complex's main building, the 150,000-square-foot Kay Beard Building, to be redeveloped into an affordable senior living home with 106 total units. The property's blighted buildings, including a power plant, vacant museum and charred bakery, are to be leveled and cleared away, per the contract.

It also stipulates that the family living center on the property, which currently houses 25 homeless families through the nonprofit Samaritas, will remain.

Quote:
"In the grand scheme of things, this is a great amount of investment that hasn't seen this kind of investment in a very long time," Rahal said. "I think it speaks loudly for Michigan Avenue —from downtown to Midtown to Dearborn, now all the way to Westland.

Westland Mayor William Wild issued a statement in support of the project, saying it would serve as a catalyst for more development in the area.

"The addition of new housing will help to support a nearby commercial center and the developers have agreed to remove blighted structures that exist on the property as part of the redevelopment," he said in the statement.

Since closing in the early 1980s, the property has been largely abandoned, and the hospital has been subject to regular trespassing from ghost hunters who have flocked from all over to explore it. Local, national and even international media seized upon the folklore and have called it one of the most haunted places in Michigan.
http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article...o-see-new-life
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Last edited by Docta_Love; Jun 22, 2018 at 5:25 PM.
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  #45  
Old Posted Jun 24, 2018, 11:26 PM
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A step in the right direction ... Novi's mayor is pushing for the wealthy outer suburb to join SMART. It's good to see Novi getting serious about transit as someone who lives next to Novi it's a place I avoid at all costs during rush hour even more so than I do the intersection of 12 Mile and Orchard Lake and that's saying something.

It's good to see but long over due however if Novi does join SMART the benefits of reducing traffic congestion will hopefully convince other large communities in the area to opt in such as Walled Lake / Commerce TWP.


Quote:
Novi mayor gets on the SMART bus

CHAD LIVENGOOD
Crain's Detroit Business
June 19, 2018

Novi's mayor is calling for the affluent Oakland County suburb to join the SMART bus system, a significant development in the push to expand transit options into areas of the suburbs that have long been disconnected from the rest of the region.

Mayor Bob Gatt said Tuesday he's directed Novi's city manager to invite SMART General Manager John Hertel to make a presentation to City Council as soon next month on opting into the suburban bus system.

"I'm aboard the SMART train and hoping that I can get council to bring SMART to Novi," Gatt told Crain's.

Gatt moved to start debate on joining SMART at Monday's City Council meeting, four months to the day after I wrote about the often treacherous journey low-wage workers face in trying to get to a minimum wage job at Twelve Oaks Mall.

Last month, Wayne County Executive Warren Evans made a similar trek to the one I took to demonstrate how much walking along busy roads low-wage workers from Detroit endure in getting to retail and hospitality sector jobs in Novi. Evans had to take two buses and walk two miles to get to a Best Buy on Haggerty Road.

Because Novi is not part of SMART, buses drop off passengers at 12 Mile and Haggerty Road at the Farmington Hills border, forcing workers to walk the last mile or two to the mall and other nearby shopping centers.

"I didn't like to see people walking down 12 Mile from Haggerty to get to work," Gatt said.

Joining SMART, Gatt said, is "the right thing to do."

"And we're going to do it," he said.

By opting into SMART, Novi would add a 1-mill property tax to fund bus service, likely along Grand River Avenue and the mile roads that run east and west and currently stop at the city's border.

The Novi mayor said he still remains "100 percent opposed" to a proposed 1.5-mill property tax for the Regional Transit Authority.

"I got the ball rolling, and I believe that if/when the RTA issue is put to bed by not making the ballot, the SMART issue will gain steam," Gatt said.

Opting into SMART could be the compromise for getting some level of public transit in Novi, a city where 85 percent of its 37,000 workers do not live.
http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article...-the-smart-bus
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