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  #41  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2017, 8:42 PM
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Birmingham's busiest route is #45 - Bessemer-Jonesboro at a laughable 586 a day. LINK

We received a federal grant recently to implement a 10 mile BRT line. Hopefully, that coupled with our new bus terminal and intermodal station will lead to an increase in ridership across the board.
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  #42  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2017, 9:32 PM
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Originally Posted by mrnyc View Post
its really two different bus lines though, the express and the local busses. not sure that counts.
Are they on the same street for the vast majority of their length? Can you basically use them interchangeably? If so, then it counts. You're getting to the difference between a "line" and a "route." A line might have a service pattern comprised of multiple routes.

Multiple lines that happen to share the same street for a few blocks but mostly go different places would not count.
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  #43  
Old Posted Nov 28, 2017, 4:32 AM
Tcmetro Tcmetro is offline
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Top 10 routes in Minneapolis/St Paul area:

5 - Chicago-Fremont: 17,808 riders per day. Starts in Brooklyn Center, through the north side, downtown, hospital district, and the south side to the Mall of America. To be replaced by D Line rapid bus in the next few years.

21/53 - Selby-Lake: 14,710 riders per day. Operates between Uptown Minneapolis and Downtown St. Paul via Lake St and Selby Ave. 53 is the peak-hour limited stop variant, that uses I-94 instead of Selby. To be replaced by B Line rapid bus in the near future, and a grade-separated streetcar in the long term.

18 - Nicollet: 12,802 riders per day. Operates from Downtown Minneapolis due south via Nicollet Ave. Potentially being replaced by streetcar or rapid bus in the future.

10/59 - Central: 10,691 riders per day. Operates from Downtown Minneapolis to NE Mpls and Northtown Mall via Central Ave. 59 is a peak-hour limited-stop version. To potentially be replaced by rapid bus or streetcar.

6 - University-Hennepin-Xerxes-France: 10,182 riders per day. Operates from the University of Minnesota to Downtown Minneapolis, then south through Uptown, Southwest Minneapolis, Southdale, and Edina. A portion of this line is due to become the E Line rapid bus.

19 - Penn Ave N: 7,969 riders per day. Connects Downtown Minneapolis to the north side and Brooklyn Center. Due to be replaced by the C Line rapid bus in the next few years.

3 - Como-Front: 7,952 riders per day. Connects Downtown Minneapolis and Downtown St. Paul via the University of Minnesota and some student-heavy neighborhoods.

17 - St. Louis Park - Washington St NE: 7,789 riders per day. Connects the Knollwood area through Uptown and Downtown Minneapolis to NE Mpls. Overlaps parts of routes 6, 10, and 18.

4 - Johnson NE-Lyndale S-Penn S: 7,079 riders per day. Connects NE Mpls and New Brighton to South Minneapolis and Southtown.

22 - Lyndale Ave N - Cedar/28th Ave S: 6,695 riders per day. Connects Brooklyn Center to the VA Hospital via the north side, Downtown Minneapolis, and the south side.

Data from MN Geospatial Commons: https://gisdata.mn.gov/dataset/us-mn...ngs-alightings
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  #44  
Old Posted Nov 28, 2017, 4:41 AM
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Some other busiest route for Canadian systems:

Brantford (2011)
4 Mall Link 1,895

Kitchener-Waterloo [Grand River Transit] (2012)
7 Mainline 16,228 (regular)
200 iXpress 13,240 (express)

Hamilton (2009)
1 King 13,359 (regular)
10 Beeline 5,393 (express)

Oshawa [Durham Region Transit] (2012)
401 Simcoe 8,600

http://dmg.utoronto.ca/pdf/tts/2011/validation2011.pdf

Sorry I should've posted these before. It's from the same document. Also, I didn't notice you are listing urban areas only so sorry about my earlier post.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tascalisa View Post
Birmingham's busiest route is #45 - Bessemer-Jonesboro at a laughable 586 a day. LINK

We received a federal grant recently to implement a 10 mile BRT line. Hopefully, that coupled with our new bus terminal and intermodal station will lead to an increase in ridership across the board.
That's probably around 700 boardings per weekday, which is the usual measurement. But yeah that's still really bad, and it will probably take a lot more than BRT and new terminals to fix that.
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  #45  
Old Posted Nov 28, 2017, 4:42 AM
Tcmetro Tcmetro is offline
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Top 10 Pace (suburban Chicago):

352 Halsted (South suburbs) - 5,150 per day.
290 Touhy (North) - 3,450 per day.
270 Milwaukee (North) - 2,963 per day.
381 95th St (South) - 2,902 per day.
307 Harlem (West) - 2,787 per day.
250 Dempster (North) - 2,778 per day.
318 North (West) - 2,671 per day.
349 Western (South) - 2,349 per day.
322 Cermak (West) - 2,288 per day.
364 159th St (South) - 2,050 per day.

http://www.rtams.org/rtams/ridership...ataset=paceBus
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  #46  
Old Posted Nov 28, 2017, 5:44 AM
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Thanks everyone. Keep them coming. I've been updating the spreadsheet continuously.

I now have 21 of the top 30 US urbanized areas, and 6 of the top 10 Canadian.
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  #47  
Old Posted Nov 28, 2017, 7:08 AM
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I'd give you Detroit's, but even the latest available figures are totally out of date as they came right after the city's backruptcy where service level were cut a full 20% to DDOT. The department has been literally adding back new trips every quarter since then. 24 hour service wasn't added back until January of last year. Then you have the fact that the suburban system (SMART) has commuter-type service in and out of the city during peak hours, and which had to cut 22% of its service in 2011 as a result of the fall-out of the recession. It's an was an embarrasingly low number. The corridor along Woodward between downtown and New Center averages around 60,000 trips per day for DDOT (not including SMART), but that includes 9 different routes, 8 of which only use a small section of Woodward.

I'll see if I can get some recent numbers. Basically, it'd be adding DDOT's #53, which is local city service, with SMART's #445 & #475, which are both suburban limiteds. Then you'd maybe have to add in #450 and #460 which are literally designed to pick up where DDOT's #53 leaves off (the shared State Fair Transit Center) since SMART isn't legally allowed to duplicate services in the city. In any case, inbound trips once they hit the city limits prevent SMART from dropping off passengers until the terminal, and on outbound trips passengers can not be dropped off in the city. Combined, these routes only carried 12,400 in 2014, a bit over a year after the bankruptcy-induced service cuts.
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Last edited by LMich; Nov 28, 2017 at 7:22 AM.
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  #48  
Old Posted Nov 28, 2017, 3:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LMich View Post
I'd give you Detroit's, but even the latest available figures are totally out of date as they came right after the city's backruptcy where service level were cut a full 20% to DDOT. The department has been literally adding back new trips every quarter since then. 24 hour service wasn't added back until January of last year. Then you have the fact that the suburban system (SMART) has commuter-type service in and out of the city during peak hours, and which had to cut 22% of its service in 2011 as a result of the fall-out of the recession. It's an was an embarrasingly low number. The corridor along Woodward between downtown and New Center averages around 60,000 trips per day for DDOT (not including SMART), but that includes 9 different routes, 8 of which only use a small section of Woodward.

I'll see if I can get some recent numbers. Basically, it'd be adding DDOT's #53, which is local city service, with SMART's #445 & #475, which are both suburban limiteds. Then you'd maybe have to add in #450 and #460 which are literally designed to pick up where DDOT's #53 leaves off (the shared State Fair Transit Center) since SMART isn't legally allowed to duplicate services in the city. In any case, inbound trips once they hit the city limits prevent SMART from dropping off passengers until the terminal, and on outbound trips passengers can not be dropped off in the city. Combined, these routes only carried 12,400 in 2014, a bit over a year after the bankruptcy-induced service cuts.
Is the 12,400 number the 53+445+475+450+460, or only some of those?
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  #49  
Old Posted Nov 28, 2017, 6:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirrus View Post
Are they on the same street for the vast majority of their length? Can you basically use them interchangeably? If so, then it counts. You're getting to the difference between a "line" and a "route." A line might have a service pattern comprised of multiple routes.

Multiple lines that happen to share the same street for a few blocks but mostly go different places would not count.

by that definition they are the same. to me as a rider though, if you have a local and an express, they are such different busses, with such different purposes, that no matter the routing, i really can't see it as the same. i'm too deep in daily transit use to see the forest through the trees, so i guess i'm in the minority on that.
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  #50  
Old Posted Nov 28, 2017, 7:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirrus View Post
Is the 12,400 number the 53+445+475+450+460, or only some of those?
It's all of them.

DDOT: #53
SMART: #445/475 (Limiteds Commuter, only during peak hours), #450/450 (Main Corridor, local north of Detroit all day - Detroit during peak hours)

I totally forgot another one of the SMART limiteds, though: #465. That brought the number in 2014 up to 12,716 weekday. However, this number does not include the RTA (Regional Transit Authority) Woodward RefleX service (#498), which runs on the corridor for 20 hours a day. RefleX (#498) is the only one that runs the entire corridor for most of the day and night (since September 2016), with DDOT's #53 running 24-hours (since January 2016), but only as far as 8 Mile.
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  #51  
Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 3:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrnyc View Post
by that definition they are the same. to me as a rider though, if you have a local and an express, they are such different busses, with such different purposes, that no matter the routing, i really can't see it as the same. i'm too deep in daily transit use to see the forest through the trees, so i guess i'm in the minority on that.
If it covers the same route, then it is a single line or route. If they segregate it in local and express it is just for the convinience of riders, so people using it for a longer length can have a shorter ride.
In New York, there are many subway services divided in local/express, would you say they are different lines?

edit: just realized that NY subway is not a good example, because in most cases the express/local services are actually different services (different branches) Maybe a good example there is the 7 train, that is a single line that has local/express services covering the exact same route.

Last edited by CCs77; Dec 1, 2017 at 1:29 PM.
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  #52  
Old Posted Dec 7, 2017, 8:00 PM
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I encourage you to add Mexico to make it a true north american data set.

Metrobus Line 1 has 480,000 daily passengers

Source:
http://data.metrobus.cdmx.gob.mx/fichas.html#uno
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  #53  
Old Posted Jun 10, 2018, 11:23 AM
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Minato Ku Minato Ku is offline
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The busiest bus lines in Paris

-TVM (Trans Val de Marne) : Saint-Maur - Créteil RER ↔ La Croix de Berny RER
32 stops 19.7 km
22.9 million (77,000 per weekday)
-183 : Porte de Choisy ↔ Aéroport d'Orly - Terminal Sud.
35 stops 16.5 km
16.9 million (54,000 per weekday)
-62 : Porte de Saint-Cloud ↔ Porte de France
43 stops 11 km
15.6 million (54,000 per weekday)
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  #54  
Old Posted Jun 10, 2018, 12:01 PM
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I think they could safely replace the Val-de-Marne BRT by a decent tram line, though. It would be worth the money given daily ridership.

People always feel more comfortable with rail that's much more easily recognizable and most often more reliable on one's everyday routine.
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  #55  
Old Posted Jun 11, 2018, 3:21 PM
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^
Interesting. I didn't know about TVM, although I did assume Paris had things like it. Also this may be the first time I've seen a Parisian use the term "BRT." Thanks for the info.
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