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Old Posted Nov 29, 2006, 5:53 AM
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What do you think of bungalows?

Salt Lake City, for being a western city, has an awful lot of bungalows in its central core. Though from my travels, the style in Salt Lake isn't widely popular throughout the west and the brick style is in stark contrast to that of the stucco style of California bungalows. Typically, like the California bungalow, Salt Lake bungalows have a dominant porch, sloping roofs and have 1 to 1 1/2 stories. The Salt Lake bungalow is referred to as an Prairie-style bungalow. This style was actually developed to reflect the early work of Frank Lloyd Wright and also shares some influence with Japanese prints. This style isn't widely used throughout the west and can be found mostly in the midwestern area of the United States.

The best area to spot bungalows in Salt Lake is south of downtown throughout the Liberty Park neighborhoods of East Central South, Liberty Wells, East Liberty and West Liberty.
Here's an aerial view of a typical "bungalow" hood in Salt Lake City.

This area is located just off of State Street and about 1100 South, just south of downtown SLC. As you can see, most these homes are bungalow-style.



Here's a street level photo:





This is the style seen predominantly throughout the city. Typically in neighborhoods built pre-war.

Some California bungalows on the west-side of the city.





Foursquare bungalows aren't dominant in the city, however a few older neighborhoods in SLC have them.

What's your general feeling on bungalows? To me, I love them, especially the wide porches. I know they're not the most urban, but are classic in my mind. Comments?

Last edited by Comrade; Jun 2, 2012 at 10:05 PM.
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  #2  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2006, 6:10 AM
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There ok. Not too bad but nothing special either.
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  #3  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2006, 6:34 AM
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bungalows are very common in chicago's outer neighborhoods and inner ring suburbs. they are almost always brick (both red and blond being very common) and they typically have some degree of prairie/craftsman detailing/ornamentation except for the postwar bungalows which have a cleaner and more modern/less ornamented aesthetic. and the roof ridge is almost always prependicular to the street, ending in either a gable or a hip with an attic window dormer.

one advantage chicago bungalow hoods have over those in some other cities is that chicago is a heavily "alleyed" city. just about every block in this city is bisected by an alley, so vehicles are kept in alley-accessed garages and that results in the absense of sideyard driveways, which i think helps give chicago bungalow hoods a slightly more intimate/urban feeling despite being comprised of detached single family homes.

here are some fairly typical examples of the chicago bungalow:











these pics are all google searched, not my own.
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Last edited by Steely Dan; Nov 29, 2006 at 7:20 AM.
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Old Posted Nov 29, 2006, 3:54 PM
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^ I like Chicago's.
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Old Posted Nov 29, 2006, 5:26 PM
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houston heights is full of them:



if i were to get a house, it would be one of these; they have so much character, were well built and are about the right size.
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Old Posted Nov 29, 2006, 10:13 PM
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I love them.
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  #7  
Old Posted Nov 30, 2006, 5:30 AM
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Edmonton has a few varying styles.

Turn of the Century (1895-1920) - Found in Glenora and along Jasper Avenue between Sherif Robertson and Dawson Park. Spacy,quite bourgeouis but also rare and pricey.

The Great Depression (1920-1940) - While the Depression did not begin until 1929, the architecture is genrally the same. Simple steep sloped roofs on small plots of land, usually one or two bedrooms. Many of the ones that stick out like sore thumbs are usually considered haunted. Very plain and very cheap houses. Mostly found in McCauley and area.

Leduc Oil Boom Pt. I (1940-1950) - The sizes of the houses grew larger, and on larger plots of lands. This was the first attempt at recovering from the war but nobody really had any money in the area until oil was found in 1947. Houses like this may be found in Argyll and West Jasper Place.

Leduc Oil Boom Pt. II (1950-1960) - People started accumulating money and the design changed. The roofs were less steep, 2 or 3 bedroom houses with large open basements. Large Picture window to one side, two bedroom windows peaking to the other side. Found lots in Jasper Place.

Fort McMurray Boom I (1960-1980) - Not many houses built in the 60's but in the 70's there was a boom. People were more used to an urbanised landscape so on similar sized plots of land as the ones used in the 50's, but the houses themself were larger and they became more experimental in designs. You'll find this in West Meadowlark and Terwillegar.

Fort McMurray Boom I Part II (1980-1990) - Millwoods was created and designs were larger and even more creative and varied.

Fort McMurray Boom II (1990-now) - 4-level splits is the most common design now. Found plenty in St. Albert, Ellerslie, Terwillegar, Sherwood Park.







======

For specific materials, stucco has been shunned. Instead a shingle-pattern wooden siding has been the general preference throughout the century. Many of the houses from the turn of the century used brick as that was actually a bylaw created to stop town-fires from spreading. (Re: Chicago & Vancouver Fires)
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Old Posted Nov 30, 2006, 6:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmancuso
houston heights is full of them:



if i were to get a house, it would be one of these; they have so much character, were well built and are about the right size.
I love these types of bugalows, too. If I could afford it, that style would probably be my choice of home.
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Old Posted Dec 1, 2006, 9:48 PM
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I dont really like Bungalows, sorry
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  #10  
Old Posted Dec 2, 2006, 2:31 AM
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some look great...others dont look as hot...i personally wouldnt want to live in one though...
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  #11  
Old Posted Dec 2, 2006, 2:51 AM
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In Australian cities... there were wave of styles influencing the designs of the houses over decades

There were Edwardian (turn of century), Federation style, Austere (post World War) and this style famously called Californian Bungalow (Calbang)

I think the Californian Bungalow was hugely popular in around 1930-1940s and these days - they are a sought after properties (and pricey ie >$600,000 to $850,000 AUD) as now they are considered inner city location with established ameneties


I really like them. When these houses are renovated - they provide really good character homes


Adelaide city has beautiful samples










Perth




some Melbourne pockets have these houses



with lovely interior




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Last edited by Alibaba; Dec 2, 2006 at 5:48 AM.
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  #12  
Old Posted Dec 2, 2006, 9:45 AM
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I really enjoy the bungalow neighborhoods because of the rebuilding possibilites. Growing up in northern Indiana, they were everywhere. While they often are not the best neighborhoods, they often become the best in-town neighborhoods. As people have shown, the architectural styles range dramatically, and they beg for rennovation. I have seen some amazing homes be transformed for fairly reasonable budgets. They are smaller than the traditional suburban home. They tend to have better construction solely because of their age. They have small yards with less maintenance required. They are gold mines, financially, architecturally, and culturally IMHO.
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Old Posted Dec 4, 2006, 10:44 AM
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i am interested to see the real bungalow in California

Would like to see how they differ or similar to those in australia ?
any photos anyone ?
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Old Posted Dec 4, 2006, 8:26 PM
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google greene and greene bungalows. pretty much the highlight of the form, imo.
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  #15  
Old Posted Dec 16, 2006, 5:20 PM
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Well around my local borough the houses are mainly 2/3 floors, semi-detached or terrace. There are few bungalows, but they are normally squashed in between bigger houses.

I think they're fine... when I'm older I sure don't want stairs, but some are restrictive in size.. on the same area you only get half the floorspace, obviously.
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Old Posted Dec 16, 2006, 5:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
bungalows are very common in chicago's outer neighborhoods and inner ring suburbs. they are almost always brick (both red and blond being very common) and they typically have some degree of prairie/craftsman detailing/ornamentation except for the postwar bungalows which have a cleaner and more modern/less ornamented aesthetic. and the roof ridge is almost always prependicular to the street, ending in either a gable or a hip with an attic window dormer.

one advantage chicago bungalow hoods have over those in some other cities is that chicago is a heavily "alleyed" city. just about every block in this city is bisected by an alley, so vehicles are kept in alley-accessed garages and that results in the absense of sideyard driveways, which i think helps give chicago bungalow hoods a slightly more intimate/urban feeling despite being comprised of detached single family homes.

here are some fairly typical examples of the chicago bungalow:








these pics are all google searched, not my own.
Unless theres a different definition of bungalow over here.. surely those aren't bungalows as they appear to have two floors? Windows in the roof?

Surely that makes them houses?
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Old Posted Dec 16, 2006, 6:34 PM
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Unless theres a different definition of bungalow over here.. surely those aren't bungalows as they appear to have two floors? Windows in the roof?
those are textbook examples of the "chicago bungalow". it's possible that the word is defined differently in london, but that has no bearing on how the word is used in chicago. the windows you're seeing on the second floor are simply attic windows. in many chicago bungalows the attic has been converted into additional living space. just about all chicago bungalows also have full basements as well, which gives a family even more options for additonal living space as it grows. so with attic and basement buildouts, a two bedroom bungalow, can easily become a 4 or even 5 bedroom bungalow.
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Old Posted Dec 16, 2006, 6:34 PM
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They are called bungalows in Chicago but are probably an evolution of the Chicago "workingmans cottage"....

There are bungalow neighborhoods across the Midwest and South as this was a very very popular house style in the first half of the 20th century in the USA. Each city has sort of local variation on the style.

Some Dayton bungalows, from the pre-WWII neighborhoods of suburban Kettering.








...a rare (for Dayton) Chicago-style bungalow









...this style of bungalow is pretty common in Louisville, too....


Last edited by Jeff_in_Dayton; Dec 16, 2006 at 6:44 PM.
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  #19  
Old Posted Dec 16, 2006, 7:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
those are textbook examples of the "chicago bungalow". it's possible that the word is defined differently in london, but that has no bearing on how the word is used in chicago. the windows you're seeing on the second floor are simply attic windows. in many chicago bungalows the attic has been converted into additional living space. just about all chicago bungalows also have full basements as well, which gives a family even more options for additonal living space as it grows. so with attic and basement buildouts, a two bedroom bungalow, can easily become a 4 or even 5 bedroom bungalow.
Ah I see... I've always thought of a bungalow as only having one floor. As soon as it has more then it becomes a house. Of course, if it's a loft conversion it becomes a gray area.

Here's what ive always seen as a "typical" bungalow, anyway:

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  #20  
Old Posted Dec 17, 2006, 1:29 AM
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Bungalows are great! Very cozy if the layout is interesting. I used to live in one as a kid, and we had a lot of ideas about how to remodel the interior while still retaining the original exterior. But then the parents got divorced and we moved away.
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