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  #5601  
Old Posted Sep 2, 2018, 11:34 PM
Always Sunny in SLC Always Sunny in SLC is offline
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As long as gas is not taxed to fully cover the cost of roads and/or we don’t pay by the mile or time of day we drive (dynamic rolled roads) and as long as we are willing to widen surface roads to accommodate the commuter at the expense of the resident, we will continue to see this kind of development. People are rational and folloe their economic best interest, especially when it is subsidized.
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  #5602  
Old Posted Sep 11, 2018, 3:38 PM
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Panorama of the Murray Central Station area. Starting to create a small skyline around the station. Would like to see a few more 4-5 floor buildings added and a couple in the 8-10 floor range.

by Steven Fidler, on Flickr

Murray Crossing apartments are coming along nicely and glad to know it will have 20,000 square feet of retail space. Still bummed there is nothing bigger than a two bedroom unit.

by Steven Fidler, on Flickr

Last edited by StevenF; Sep 11, 2018 at 5:46 PM.
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  #5603  
Old Posted Sep 11, 2018, 4:43 PM
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https://www.ksl.com/article/46389040...-supreme-court

Fight over Cottonwood Mall project headed to Utah Supreme Court

Quote:
The legal battle over the former Cottonwood Mall site is headed for Utah's highest court.

A 3rd District Court judge issued a split ruling on the pending legal challenges regarding the proposed redevelopment plan of the old Cottonwood Mall acreage. Holladay city officials and developers appealed the rulings to the Utah Supreme Court.

In rendering his decision on Friday, Judge Richard McKelvie said that Holladay’s decision on the tax increment financing for the development of the vacant parcel was not subject to voter referendum, but the amended site plan for the project could be challenged and will appear on the ballot in November.

Both decisions, however, are being appealed to the Utah Supreme Court, which has scheduled oral arguments for Sept. 21.

“We thank Judge McKelvie for hearing this matter so quickly and for taking decisive action that will allow this matter to move forward toward a final decision,” Holladay Mayor Rob Dahle said in a news release.

The ruling was handed down on the same day as the deadline for cities to submit ballot information to Salt Lake County. Holladay City Council members voted in August to conduct a special election in November, pending the outcome of current legal activities.

In response to the ruling, developers Clark Ivory, CEO of Ivory Homes, and Jeff Woodbury, senior vice president of Woodbury Corp., issued a joint statement commending the court's decision that will allow the case to move forward.

"(Judge McKelvie) upheld the Agreement to Develop Land critical for projects requiring challenging redevelopment. This will generate positive returns for the city of Holladay," the statement said. "As a state, we must come to terms with how we will best manage growth and development in the future. We will ask the Supreme Court to uphold the city’s approval of our Site Development Master Plan. Their decision will establish important precedent and impact property rights and the ability of mayors and city councils to carefully administer the long-term planning of their cities."

The Ivory Homes and Woodbury Corp. proposal, approved by the Holladay City Council in May, calls for a multi-use city center on the former site of the defunct Cottonwood Mall.

The development plans include 775 apartments, with a maximum height of 90 feet, or seven stories. The plan also includes up to 210 total residential units, including 79 single-family homes, 22 units of brownstone-style homes, 39 units described as "Creekside Manor" homes, and up to 40 retail shops and restaurants.

Opponents of the project claimed the development would create an uncharacteristically dense community and collected thousands of signatures in an effort to get a ballot referendum.

In response to the latest legal proceeding, Brett Stohlton with Unite for Holladay said the organization is hopeful the voters of Holladay will have a chance to "have their voices heard" on Election Day in November.

"We were disappointed that the city and developers both took the position of trying to prevent the people from voting," he said. "We're excited that the people will have an opportunity to vote on this."

Stohlton said the group is "pro-development" and would like to see something done to the 57-acre site, but there are some issues regarding how the project has been put together that gives some residents concerns about the long-term financial benefits to the city as well as the density that has been proposed.

"The agreement that has been struck is not a good one," he said. "We're giving a bunch of tax subsidies to two of the wealthiest developers in Utah and the city is really not getting that much in return. It feels like we're selling ourselves short and Holladay can do better."

He is optimistic about the upcoming review by the Utah high court and the chance for a referendum in the coming weeks.

A final decision from the Utah Supreme Court is expected by the end of the month.
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  #5604  
Old Posted Sep 11, 2018, 5:03 PM
Always Sunny in SLC Always Sunny in SLC is offline
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Hearing from busy-bodied citizens that hold up reasonable developments always kill my zen.
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  #5605  
Old Posted Sep 11, 2018, 5:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Always Sunny in SLC View Post
Hearing from busy-bodied citizens that hold up reasonable developments always kill my zen.
Those people have gone way to long with the mall out of the way and have gotten used to the lower traffic.
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  #5606  
Old Posted Sep 11, 2018, 10:47 PM
Liberty Wellsian Liberty Wellsian is offline
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TIF does not mean the city sends a Brinks truck to a developers house to drop off piles of cash!

Srs
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  #5607  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2018, 4:51 AM
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/\/\/\

What??
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  #5608  
Old Posted Sep 19, 2018, 2:03 AM
asies1981 asies1981 is offline
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  #5609  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2018, 5:10 PM
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New Intermountain Transformation Center to lead change in health care


https://www.deseretnews.com/article/...alth-care.html





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  #5610  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2018, 7:41 PM
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Wow. That is gorgeous. I had no idea they had that beautiful serendipitous glass façade. Does anyone know what architecture firm designed this?

This is the only rendering I've seen of the place:



I found a partial shot of that side.

Last edited by Orlando; Sep 20, 2018 at 7:58 PM.
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  #5611  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2018, 10:32 PM
JMK JMK is offline
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If my memory is correct it's wrns studio
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  #5612  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2018, 12:21 AM
Liberty Wellsian Liberty Wellsian is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Orlando View Post
/\/\/\

What??
Everytime Tax Increment Financing is used to help a development there is a ridiculous and ill informed backlash.

NIMBYs use it as a weapon. "Why should we give rich people money?"

One might respond "Actually we are giving them a tax break on the their increased property taxes to help the project pencil out"

Dumb look on their face
3
2
1
"Yeah but..."
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  #5613  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2018, 12:24 AM
Liberty Wellsian Liberty Wellsian is offline
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Originally Posted by JMK View Post
New Intermountain Transformation Center to lead change in health care


https://www.deseretnews.com/article/...alth-care.html





We need more Murray minded towns on the WF
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  #5614  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2018, 12:30 AM
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Wasatch County approves major development tied to Deer Valley
https://dta0yqvfnusiq.cloudfront.net...a-1140x819.jpg

Wasatch County leaders recently approved plans for a major development envisioned to someday become an eastern portal of Deer Valley Resort, a project seen as a possibility for decades and one that, in sheer numbers, is audacious even in an area where the resort industry continues to boom.

The Wasatch County Council in late August approved an overall plan for the land known as Mayflower. The 940 acres are located on the Deer Valley side of U.S. 40 south of the Mayflower exit, stretching from close to the Jordanelle Reservoir to the slopes. Significant development has long been contemplated at the location, but the prospects became more likely with the 2017 sale of the land to a New York City firm called Extell Development Company. Two firms under the corporate umbrella of Netherlands-based Stichting Mayflower sold the land.


The Wasatch County approval involved:

• 1,498 equivalent residential units, allowing a mixture of houses, hotel rooms and condominiums. The precise breakdown will not be known until detailed plans are presented.

• 410 hotel units

• a hotel that will be developed for the benefit of members of the military

• 250,000 square feet of commercial or retail space

• a 68,000-square-foot recreation center

• 95,000 square feet of housing for the workforce

The project also calls for an expansion of Deer Valley skiing infrastructure. The resort says six new lifts are planned as part of the project, which is anticipated to expand the skiing terrain by approximately 900 acres. The terrain is expected to include upward of 200 acres of runs with the remainder planned as glade skiing.

Wasatch County sees the project, referred to in county planning documents as Mayflower Mountain Resort, as another Deer Valley base area. It is designed as a resort village, the documents say.

"This is the largest project we've had to date and most likely the largest we'll ever have," said Doug Smith, the planning director in Wasatch County.

Smith said it could take up to 40 years for the development to be fully constructed. He said detailed designs will be reviewed later. The design calls for nearly two-thirds of the land to be set aside as open space.

Smith said Mayflower Mountain Resort will be designed to be pedestrian friendly and with transit options. The Planning Commission in Wasatch County spent time on issues like traffic, vehicle access to the location and the idea of constructing residential units on hillsides, he said. The plans call for a "compact" overall development, he said.

Smith said the project is anticipated to be a "huge economic boom" for Wasatch County. A Wasatch County report recognizes the potential economic impacts.

"The opportunity for summer activities and skiing in the winter is hoped to provide high occupancy rates year round. Not many resort developments offer a 45 minute drive from an international airport with a State park reservoir within close proximity to the number 1 or 2 ranked ski resort in the country," the report says.

The report outlines that a Resort Village planned in Mayflower Mountain Resort will have a five-star hotel and a four-star hotel as well as a conference center of 40,000 square feet. Development within the Resort Village is designed to be within a radius of 1,200 feet from the center, the report says, something that Wasatch County says promotes the pedestrian friendliness.

The Resort Village is also designed to have a ski beach, a promenade and an ice-skating rink or another feature that will draw people, according to the report. The report also discusses trail development that could connect Deer Valley, Park City, the Deer Crest area of Deer Valley and Wasatch Mountain State Park.

The overall Mayflower Mountain Resort involves 3,471 parking spots between surface lots and garages. Of those spots, upward of 1,200 will be designed to serve skiers at the resort for the day.

Developers over time have shifted their attention to the periphery of Park City as the number of significant parcels of land within the city dwindled. Outlying acreage in Summit County and Wasatch County has been of interest for more than a decade as developers sought locations close to the mountain resorts. It is rare, though, for a tract of land to enjoy a location like Mayflower Mountain Resort.

Deer Valley Resort President and Chief Operating Officer Bob Wheaton praised the efforts, saying the project is well planned and the developer is "top notch." He said the Jordanelle Express Gondola, located on the Wasatch County side of the resort, is successful and the skiing infrastructure planned as part of Mayflower would "certainly enhance that." Wheaton also said a project could cut traffic headed into Park City by providing an alternative access to the resort.

Last edited by delts145; Jan 14, 2019 at 11:57 AM.
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  #5615  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2018, 11:31 AM
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High-flying Pluralsight breaks ground on new Draper HQ


Deseret News - https://www.deseretnews.com/article/...draper-hq.html

Pluralsight — the Utah-based on-demand, cloud-based tech education company —continued a year of heady benchmarks Tuesday, breaking ground on an expansive new world headquarters in Draper. The 350,000-square-foot facility is the first in a planned series of buildings on the company's 30-acre campus. Pluralsight outperformed all expectations in a public stock offering earlier this year, and continues to accrue value for investors. On Tuesday, Pluralsight's stock was trading at $32 per share, with a market capitalization of almost $3.5 billion.


Artist rendering of phase 1 of Pluralsight's new Draper headquarters. The on-demand, cloud-based tech education company has been expanding at a breakneck clip, with plans to add some 2,400 new employees in the coming decade.
Pluralsight CEO Aaron Skonnard, Utah Gov. Gary Herbert and others gathered Tuesday for a groundbreaking ceremony for the new, 350,000-square-foot facility, the first of a several planned for the 30-acre campus.

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  #5616  
Old Posted Oct 6, 2018, 11:01 PM
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/\/\/\ If only it was in downtown
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  #5617  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2018, 3:46 AM
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Point of the Mountain Commission starts final phase

As plans move forward for the Point of the Mountain area, many stakeholders hope public transit and better transportation options will be top priorities.

The Point of the Mountain Development Commission met recently with landowners, government representatives, business and nonprofit organization executives, and thought leaders from various community sectors to discuss the final phase of the regional vision for the Point of the Mountain. Transit, better north/south and east/west connector roads, air and water quality, and jobs near affordable housing were of most importance for many of those gathered at the commission meeting.

The vision for the Point of the Mountain — which includes communities straddling the corridor as far north as Sandy, and as far south as Saratoga Springs, Lehi and American Fork — includes additional FrontRunner trains and stops, with an extension of TRAX over the mountain on the east side of the freeway. More east/west connections are planned between the freeway and Mountain View Corridor, with a possible high-speed North-South Boulevard connecting areas near the prison site to 2100 in Lehi.


According to Robert Grow, CEO of Envision Utah, Utah has a unique opportunity to develop the Point of the Mountain area. If business, community and political leaders do the right thing, Grow said, revenue and income within the area will grow significantly. According to Envision Utah data, if the area is designed right, as many as 150,000 additional high-paying jobs will come to the area, and the entire area will experience a 12 percent increase in average household income.

“If we fail, we will lose even more jobs than we realize,” Grow said, explaining that for every information technology job that does not come to Utah, Utah loses four related support jobs, eight other jobs in the community and $816,000 in annual personal income across the state.

The commission is in Phase 3 of the process, addressing funding mechanisms for the roughly $11 billion needed for implementation of the vision. Jon Bronson, senior vice president and managing director of Zions Bank, spoke briefly at the meeting regarding funding, and explained there is currently not a funding mechanism in place, and the teams involved in the process are exploring several options. Options may include public and private funding routes.


A map from the Point of the Mountain Development Commission's regional vision shows roads, transit, trails and other services through the Point of the Mountain area...Point of the Mountain Development Commission

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Last edited by delts145; Oct 12, 2018 at 4:08 AM.
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  #5618  
Old Posted Oct 21, 2018, 3:53 PM
SLCLvr SLCLvr is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Orlando View Post
/\/\/\ If only it was in downtown
I would have fit nicely on a corner of the parking lot between the Federal Courthouses and Little America.
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  #5619  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2018, 12:18 PM
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Midvale celebrates start of phase 2 of major redevelopment plan


..."Speaking at a ceremony to commemorate the start of the phase 2 redevelopment, Hale said today Phase 1's Bingham Junction is a national example of what a community can achieve, and the second phase will exceed even those successes."

By Jasen Lee @JasenLee1 Published: October 22, 2018 7:32 pm - https://www.deseretnews.com/article/...ment-plan.html


Heavy machinery is pictured at the site of phase 2 of View 72 at Jordan Bluffs, a former Environmental Protection Agency Superfund site, in Midvale on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. Midvale, joined by the EPA, the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, the KC Gardner Co., the Wasatch Group and the Midvale City Redevelopment Agency, announced the plans Monday. Picture By Oiling Wang, Deseret News

MIDVALE — For nearly three decades, Midvale has been working to make use of hundreds of acres of what city leaders felt could be prime real estate in the Salt Lake Valley that had been made uninhabitable following decades of industrial usage that left the land barren and polluted.

On Monday, Midvale City, the Environmental Protection Agency and Utah Department of Environmental Quality, along with the KC Gardner Company, Wasatch Group and Midvale City Redevelopment Agency, formally announced a plan to create the next high-profile, mixed-use project that will become an economic engine and residential haven for thousands of people in the years to come.

The redevelopment of Jordan Bluffs, a former EPA Superfund site, helped Midvale reclaim what is now known as Bingham Junction by reusing 351 acres of formerly contaminated land. Repurposing the land will serve the community for decades to come, said Midvale Mayor Robert Hale...

...Located adjacent to View 72 Corporate Center in Bingham Junction, the site is in the middle of the Salt Lake Metropolitan area along the banks of the Jordan River with access to regional transportation networks, explained Midvale City Economic Development Director Christopher Butte. The master-planned, mixed-use development includes more than 1,000,000 square feet of office, data center, commercial and residential components around a mile-long, linear park, he noted.



Dell Loy Hansen, founder and CEO of Wasatch Group, talks about phase 2 of View 72 at Jordan Bluffs, a former EPA Superfund site, in Midvale on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. Picture By Oiling Wang, Deseret News



JORDAN BLUFFS PROJECT AREA


[On August 10, 2004, the Redevelopment Agency of Midvale City Board of Directors adopted the Jordan Bluffs Project Area. The project area consists of 268 acres on the City’s west side. It is bound by 7800 South on the north, Holden Street and Main Street on the east, the Midvale City boundary on the south and the Jordan River on the west. The Agency has not pulled the trigger on the collection of tax increment.


History


The Jordan Bluffs Project Area consists primarily of the Sharon Steel Superfund Site. In 1902 the United States Mining Company started operation of their copper smelter on the property. Byproducts of ore processing that contained high levels of arsenic and lead from the milling operations were deposited to a waste tailings pile on the west end of the property. Between 1982 to 1990, investigations conducted by local, State, and Federal agencies determined that soils on the Sharon Steel property, as well as on nearby residential and commercial properties, had arsenic and lead concentrations at levels that posed unacceptable risks. In 1991 the site was officially listed on the EPA National Priorities List. The EPA conducted cleanup operations on the site throughout the 1990’s which resulted in capping the tailings piles with a flexible membrane liner. Because of a high level of contamination and the fact that the contaminated soil remains on the site beneath a cap system there are extraordinary costs associated with developing the property in the future. The property has been vacant for over 25 years and will require massive amounts of additional fill material and infrastructure costs for redevelopment. Over the past ten years the ownership group has conducted further investigations and preliminary placement of fill material has been done to test compaction on the site. In 2015, the RDA entered into an Option to Purchase Agreement with the current owners of Jordan Bluffs. During the option period, the Agency publicly marketed the site for private acquisition and development. At the conclusion of this process, the Agency entered into a Purchase Agreement with KC Gardner Company, L.C. It is anticipated that the developer will acquire the property in late 2017, with development to begin in 2018. In addition to new commercial and residential development, the site will also include an extension of Bingham Junction Boulevard and other infrastructure improvements...http://www.midvalecity.org/departmen...lopment-agency


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Last edited by delts145; Oct 23, 2018 at 12:59 PM.
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  #5620  
Old Posted Oct 30, 2018, 10:27 AM
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Quarry Village businesses say the area is thriving


Carolyn Webber Alder - Park Record - https://www.parkrecord.com/news/busi...a-is-thriving/

In a town growing in population, expansion is inevitable. Commercial and residential developments are spreading further and further from the center of Park City, and businesses on the periphery are benefiting from the boom.

One area experiencing the growth firsthand is Quarry Village, where housing units are springing up and several businesses are discovering the location as the perfect compromise of proximity between the Wasatch Front and the Park City core.

"The best part of Quarry Village is that it is 20 minutes to Salt Lake, and 15 to 20 minutes to Main Street," said David Nadler, director of Cushman and Wakefield, which owns the majority of the commercial space in the area.

Residents living in Pinebrook and Jeremy Ranch can avoid traffic in Kimball Junction or Main Street and get what they need close to home...

..."I think one of the biggest drivers for the success of that corridor is just getting Salt Lake employees to work there," he said. "That has been a huge factor for a lot of the companies looking to locate here right now whose employees can't necessarily afford a lot of the places to rent in Park City."

Melissa Garland, owner of Tadasana Yoga in Quarry Village, said several of her yoga instructors drive up from the Salt Lake area, and cutting off even 15 minutes makes a difference when recruiting employees...



By Tanzi Propst - Park Record

...Anker said BEPC Holdings, LLC has entitlements for another 47,000 square feet of development, which it plans to use to construct four commercial lots. The majority of the lots are expected to be filled with office space.

Then there is the new residential area currently under development. Quarry Springs, as it is called, is expected to include 68 condos in townhouse-style units....The international bicycling company Mavic moved its headquarters from Ogden to Park City this summer. After undergoing some renovations, it plans to have its grand opening in the spring.

Isaac Wilson, general manager of Mavic for North America, said Quarry Village's location near the interstate and the mountains made it the perfect spot. He is eager to see how it continues to grow.

"I don't know what it could be or would be," he said, "but for us it is ideal."

Nadler and Anker said they would both love to see a few more restaurants and other popular businesses open in the area. But with the sprawling growth, they expect the area to continue to thrive.


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Last edited by delts145; Jan 14, 2019 at 11:58 AM.
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