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  #1  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 3:57 PM
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DENVER | o2gygen | ft | 19 floors

Quote:
13th and Cherokee is a 19 story apartment building with structured parking which is to be constructed in the Golden Triangle neighborhood of Denver, Colorado. This area is immediately adjacent to and is considered part of the Central Business District. The apartment building will have a total of 289 units and 385 structured parking spaces--one space for each bedroom. The sixth floor will contain the amenities which include a state of the art fitness center, common areas, an outdoor terrace with an outdoor pool, sundeck, hot tub, fire pit, outdoor kitchen, and clubhouse/great room that will house a catering bar. The project’s units will be fashionably appointed with granite countertops, titanium finish appliances, frameless glass shower doors, satellite and cable TV, and state-of-the art, Cat-5 data connections. The modernistic design of this project was conceived to compliment the unique and stunning architecture of this neighborhood while still providing functional space. The leasing strategy is designed to appeal to tenants who make between $38,400 and $80,000. The all-in project costs are estimated at $58,384,181or $202,021 per unit. The project expects to have a LEED Silver designation. The project is the development of a 19 story apartment building located in the Golden Triangle neighborhood of Denver, just south of downtown Denver between Colfax, Speer and Lincoln Streets. The subject address is 1250 Cherokee Street. The building will have a total of 289 units with a total GSF of 407,216 for residential, amenity, and common areas, and 385 parking spaces with 15,463 GSF. The 6th floor of the building will be the amenity level which will house the workout room, pool and clubhouse.

Amenities will be plentiful and will include;

§ A state of the art fitness center
§ An outdoor terrace with grilling areas
§ Outdoor pool & Hot Tub
§ Sundeck
§ Fire pit
§ Outdoor kitchen area
§ Shade trellis
§ Clubhouse/Great Room with a catering bar, computers, coffee machines.
§ Full commercial cooking package with wall ovens, gas range, & refrigerator
§ Pool table, poker table, & shuffle board
§ Flat panel TVs in all waiting areas and elevator lobbies
§ Wiring for advanced technology features and wireless internet
§ Controlled access throughout the building

The units themselves will have upgrades such as;

§ Granite Countertops
§ Titanium Finish Appliances
§ Frameless Glass Shower Doors
§ Satellite and Cable TV Options
§ Cat-5 Data Connections

Views

The apartments start on the 6th floor, approximately 70’ above the street level. This project will enjoy uninterrupted views of the city skyline and the mountains at each level. Floor to ceiling glass in each living room will dramatically feature the outside views from the front door of each unit.

Setbacks

The south building walls for the structure were pulled in 15’ from the property line, creating an attractive pocket park.

Parking Plan

The subject property will have five floors of parking with 385 parking spaces. A simplified description is one stall per bedroom.

LEED Certification

The project should qualify for LEED Silver.
http://13cherokee.com/5073.html


http://13cherokee.com/5073.html


http://13cherokee.com/5001.html


http://13cherokee.com/5094.html


http://13cherokee.com/5115.html


http://13cherokee.com/5136.html


http://13cherokee.com/5178.html


http://13cherokee.com/5199.html

Sorry for the small renderings, it's all I could find for the time being. Construction timeframe is a slight mystery but it could start as early as Q2 2013.

EDIT: Title went all lowercase on me. Can this possibly be fixed?
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  #2  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 4:10 PM
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I've been mystified at the relative lack of highrises in Denver, given its growing economy, falling vacancies, desirable downtown, etc. Good to see some progress.

But man, gotta work on those parking requirements. It's probably a lot more spaces than the residents will want.

Q2 2013 start? Amazing process you have....in my city we'd have drawings like this a year before construction, from the design review and land use entitlement process.
     
     
  #3  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 4:59 PM
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Wow 5 floors of parking of a building of this size? C'mon Denver!!
     
     
  #4  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 6:05 PM
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Originally Posted by mhays View Post
I've been mystified at the relative lack of highrises in Denver, given its growing economy, falling vacancies, desirable downtown, etc. Good to see some progress.

But man, gotta work on those parking requirements. It's probably a lot more spaces than the residents will want.

Q2 2013 start? Amazing process you have....in my city we'd have drawings like this a year before construction, from the design review and land use entitlement process.
We have this discussion *a lot* over in our little Denver thread world. The City *has* reduced parking requirements, fairly dramatically. And yet, almost without exception, every building under construction is providing significantly more than the minimum required. Part of that might be to blunt neighborhood opposition. But a lot of it is, I think, just what the market is demanding before they'll ever be able to lease/sell units. (Our intra-city non-auto transportation options are still quite limited - that, plus I assume most folks want a car for recreational pursuits... I don't know. But my instinct is that if developers are providing parking they're not required to, they must feel like they have to.)

We don't really have a "design review" process per se, except for in historic districts or other special circumstances.
     
     
  #5  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 6:22 PM
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Originally Posted by bunt_q View Post
We have this discussion *a lot* over in our little Denver thread world. The City *has* reduced parking requirements, fairly dramatically. And yet, almost without exception, every building under construction is providing significantly more than the minimum required. Part of that might be to blunt neighborhood opposition. But a lot of it is, I think, just what the market is demanding before they'll ever be able to lease/sell units. (Our intra-city non-auto transportation options are still quite limited - that, plus I assume most folks want a car for recreational pursuits... I don't know. But my instinct is that if developers are providing parking they're not required to, they must feel like they have to.)

We don't really have a "design review" process per se, except for in historic districts or other special circumstances.
If they're doing more than required...I'm shocked. It's understandable that the majority will have cars, but not all. The edges of Downtown must have a lot of people who only walk most days, and have other options for the occasional trip where transit doesn't go. This works very well in lots of cities with similar "head for the mountains" lifestyles.

It sounds like a great opportunity for a developer....build a similar project but do 200 spaces instead of 385. Save $5,000,000 or $10,000,000, set rents a little lower....
     
     
  #6  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 6:37 PM
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I've heard from several City planners that lenders will not support projects in Denver without a certain number of parking spaces per unit because there is no "evidence" that the market will support it. What we need is a couple of developers who can go rogue and find creative financing to get a project built with less than 1 space per unit to show it can be successful before the banks will start backing it. I'm not sure when or if that will ever happen.
     
     
  #7  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 6:47 PM
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Originally Posted by rla82 View Post
I've heard from several City planners that lenders will not support projects in Denver without a certain number of parking spaces per unit because there is no "evidence" that the market will support it.
That sounds entirely possible. It's not a risk I would advise any developer to take.

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Originally Posted by mhays View Post
If they're doing more than required...I'm shocked. It's understandable that the majority will have cars, but not all. The edges of Downtown must have a lot of people who only walk most days, and have other options for the occasional trip where transit doesn't go. This works very well in lots of cities with similar "head for the mountains" lifestyles.

It sounds like a great opportunity for a developer....build a similar project but do 200 spaces instead of 385. Save $5,000,000 or $10,000,000, set rents a little lower....
It's not just about going to the mountains, etc. We still don't have a downtown grocery store. Walgreens is still your best bet for buying toilet paper downtown. Basic services and shopping are still completely lacking. The unfortunate fact is that today, living in downtown Denver without a car is extremely inconvenient, and requires a serious sacrifice. It's not a choice that many "choice" buyers will make. And let's be honest, if you can afford new construction pricing, you can afford a car. The only reason you would choose not to have one, and put yourself through that level of inconvenience, is to make a statement. There are some of those people, but not many. I would never consider a unit that didn't have a dedicated parking space - it just wouldn't be a smart decision for a young professional to make in Denver. We don't quite have the critical mass yet. But it's coming.
     
     
  #8  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 6:57 PM
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My larger concern is the new trend of 5 floors of above-grade parking beneath a residential tower. In the future when there IS lower demand for parking how are those floors retrofitted into anything viable? Though certainly more expensive, the City could be requiring below-grade parking for these new towers. That may make it less viable to construct a 20-story building, but 5- and 6-story buildings fill in the gaps in our fabric just as well and can create just as nice of a city (if not better, i.e. European models).
     
     
  #9  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 6:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bunt_q View Post
It's not just about going to the mountains, etc. We still don't have a downtown grocery store. Walgreens is still your best bet for buying toilet paper downtown. Basic services and shopping are still completely lacking. The unfortunate fact is that today, living in downtown Denver without a car is extremely inconvenient, and requires a serious sacrifice. It's not a choice that many "choice" buyers will make. And let's be honest, if you can afford new construction pricing, you can afford a car. The only reason you would choose not to have one, and put youoming.rself through that level of inconvenience, is to make a statement. There are some of those people, but not many. I would never ever consider a unit that didn't have a dedicated parking space - it just wouldn't be a smart decision for a young professional to make in Denver. We don't quite have the critical mass yet. But it's coming.
Agreed. If you are living near central downtown it's not going to be the easiest when you need to just head to the store real quick. Luckily these people will have a King Soopers very much so within walking distance on Speer, but you have to cross Speer. Anything else you need, you still gotta head to the neighborhoods. There is nothing of the sort in 'city center'. When I lived in Cap Hill, I went without a car for about a year and it wasn't too bad yet still very tedious at times.

But if I were to live in CBD [which I changed my mind about], that would be a bigger nightmare because of the lack of 'common amenities'. I'm not counting 20th and Chestnut being a 'downtown' grocer. That's still in a neighborhood. I will count a 15th and Welton area a real downtown grocer even though Target is claiming that territory.

As Bunt said, we're getting there. Slowly but surely. These people will at least have a nearby grocer but if you need to go to the hardware store, etc you're hoping in your car. Once we start getting on this inter-city rail thing it'll hopefully get better. We're adding close to 7,000 units right now and almost every unit will have a car, what's that going to do with our traffic. [but that's a different discussion on a different thread]
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  #10  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 7:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rla82 View Post
My larger concern is the new trend of 5 floors of above-grade parking beneath a residential tower. In the future when there IS lower demand for parking how are those floors retrofitted into anything viable? Though certainly more expensive, the City could be requiring below-grade parking for these new towers. That may make it less viable to construct a 20-story building, but 5- and 6-story buildings fill in the gaps in our fabric just as well and can create just as nice of a city (if not better, i.e. European models).
Parking podiums are my pet peeve. I understand underground parking is much more expensive. I wonder too, when we do get to the point where we can go completely car-free, what's going to happen to these podiums. Public parking wouldn't be half bad either since that's another issue we're going to start running into soon.

What's worse than those though? The prefabricated parking structures for the 5-story developments that are 1/3 the size and just as tall as the 5-story developments. These are also becoming a trend and it makes me quiver. Luckily they're kind of ish hidden sort of..
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  #11  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 7:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rla82 View Post
My larger concern is the new trend of 5 floors of above-grade parking beneath a residential tower. In the future when there IS lower demand for parking how are those floors retrofitted into anything viable? Though certainly more expensive, the City could be requiring below-grade parking for these new towers. That may make it less viable to construct a 20-story building, but 5- and 6-story buildings fill in the gaps in our fabric just as well and can create just as nice of a city (if not better, i.e. European models).
Storage units. Or maybe we can use them as holding pens for the homeless and the hipsters.
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  #12  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 7:06 PM
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Originally Posted by RyanD View Post
Parking podiums are my pet peeve. I understand underground parking is much more expensive. I wonder too, when we do get to the point where we can go completely car-free, what's going to happen to these podiums. Public parking wouldn't be half bad either since that's another issue we're going to start running into soon.

What's worse than those though? The prefabricated parking structures for the 5-story developments that are 1/3 the size and just as tall as the 5-story developments. These are also becoming a trend and it makes me quiver. Luckily they're kind of ish hidden sort of..
At least those are mostly wrapped by the residential portions. Theoretically they could be dismantled in the future and turned into common areas (thinking quite broadly here). I may be cynical, but the way we are building towers in Denver isn't adding to our public realm and they are mostly just urban fortresses with "fantastic views of the mountains" (until the next tower goes up and everyone cries foul).
     
     
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Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 7:09 PM
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"If you can afford new construction, you can afford a car"? This strikes me as very odd. Not having a car is how many of us can afford new construction, or can afford more square footage than otherwise. Saving $8,000 per year (or whatever) is a good reason not to own one beyond the "statement."

No supermarket? What happened to the Safeway that was somewhere near the Civic Center, or so I vagely recall? And what about corner stores and "1/3 supermarkets"? Denver's core population should at least support that.

Do professionals need a car? Sure, many do. But I work with a lot of six-figure construction people who bike or take transit to work, and maybe rent the occasional ZipCar for their more distant jobsite visits. Likewise, some leading developers live in buildings with no parking at all. And architects might be the most idealistic of all on average.
     
     
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Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 7:11 PM
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Originally Posted by rla82 View Post
My larger concern is the new trend of 5 floors of above-grade parking beneath a residential tower. In the future when there IS lower demand for parking how are those floors retrofitted into anything viable? Though certainly more expensive, the City could be requiring below-grade parking for these new towers. That may make it less viable to construct a 20-story building, but 5- and 6-story buildings fill in the gaps in our fabric just as well and can create just as nice of a city (if not better, i.e. European models).
They usually can't be. Ramps are permanent, and garages tend to have extremely low floor-to-ceiling heights.

PS, RyanD, those new units shouldn't add much to traffic...if they already work Downtown the biggest result will be shorter commutes, and better mode splits if they no longer drive. As for the 7,000 figure, I've seen a number around half that...what's the 7,000, geographically and timewise?
     
     
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Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 7:11 PM
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Originally Posted by rla82 View Post
At least those are mostly wrapped by the residential portions. Theoretically they could be dismantled in the future and turned into common areas (thinking quite broadly here). I may be cynical, but the way we are building towers in Denver isn't adding to our public realm and they are mostly just urban fortresses with "fantastic views of the mountains" (until the next tower goes up and everyone cries foul).
Except most of the tower on podium designs do have ground-floor retail and other amenities. That does go a long way towards addressing the issue of engaging the public realm. Potential retrofitting if/when automobile use significantly declines is one issue, but Denver has done a lot to prevent the possibility of the street-level of new buildings being non-engaging.
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Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 7:12 PM
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Originally Posted by mhays View Post
"Do professionals need a car? Sure, many do. But I work with a lot of six-figure construction people who bike or take transit to work, and maybe rent the occasional ZipCar for their more distant jobsite visits. Likewise, some leading developers live in buildings with no parking at all. And architects might be the most idealistic of all on average.
Unfortunately we also have crap for car-sharing services in Denver. It exists, but it could be so much more robust (i.e. ZipCar).
     
     
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Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 7:24 PM
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Originally Posted by mhays View Post
PS, RyanD, those new units shouldn't add much to traffic...if they already work Downtown the biggest result will be shorter commutes, and better mode splits if they no longer drive. As for the 7,000 figure, I've seen a number around half that...what's the 7,000, geographically and timewise?
I'll take a crack at that. In 2012 there were about 3,800 residential units under construction or recently completed within 1.5 miles of downtown Denver with another 3,200 proposed. So, there's the good possibility of adding 7,000 units in a 1.5 mile radius in a four- year time span (2011-2014).

As for their commuting patterns, there is a good chance that lot of these residents are reverse commuters who live in the city center and commute out to the suburbs. A lot of these people are choosing to live downtown for the lifestyle, not because it's closer to their places of employment.
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  #18  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 7:27 PM
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Originally Posted by mhays View Post
They usually can't be. Ramps are permanent, and garages tend to have extremely low floor-to-ceiling heights.

PS, RyanD, those new units shouldn't add much to traffic...if they already work Downtown the biggest result will be shorter commutes, and better mode splits if they no longer drive. As for the 7,000 figure, I've seen a number around half that...what's the 7,000, geographically and timewise?
Why the assumption that everyone works downtown? Everyone I know (myself included) is forced to reverse commute these days. (Another discussion we have frequently in our Denver thread.) Downtown isn't even our largest employment center, and certainly not the fastest growing.

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Originally Posted by mhays View Post
No supermarket? What happened to the Safeway that was somewhere near the Civic Center, or so I vagely recall? And what about corner stores and "1/3 supermarkets"? Denver's core population should at least support that.
I assume you're talking about the Safeway up at 20th and Washington? I'm not sure you have a good feel of distances in Central Denver. But that is not a walk, that's a drive or a bus ride (which is terribly inconvenient). Downtown Denver and the downtown neighborhoods have an enormous footprint. Good for bike sharing in summer - terrible for non-auto modes the rest of the year. You'd think we'd support a lot of things, but so far, retail has been painfully slow to materialize.

I'm not saying what "should" be, I'm just telling you what is. Everybody who lives in Central Denver drives to Glendale Target to shop (to the point that it's a bad joke), drives to Glendale 24-Hour Fitness, drives to Cherry Creek, drives to King Soopers... drive a lot of places. Maybe there *are* other options, but if people aren't using them, then they're probably not very good options. Certainly not for people who value their time.
     
     
  #19  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 7:32 PM
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Originally Posted by wong21fr View Post
I'll take a crack at that. In 2012 there were about 3,800 residential units under construction or recently completed within 1.5 miles of downtown Denver with another 3,200 proposed. So, there's the good possibility of adding 7,000 units in a 1.5 mile radius in a four- year time span (2011-2014).
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays View Post
PS, RyanD, those new units shouldn't add much to traffic...if they already work Downtown the biggest result will be shorter commutes, and better mode splits if they no longer drive. As for the 7,000 figure, I've seen a number around half that...what's the 7,000, geographically and timewise?
Just to back up Wong..


http://denverinfill.com/blog/2012/11...continues.html

I reverse commuted back in '09 and now I'm reverse commuting again. Trust me, it's much worse getting back into downtown... It's starting to get noticeable which is scaring me a bit.
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  #20  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 7:35 PM
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It's starting to get noticeable..
It's not just starting to get noticeable. Check traffic stats, it's very real. Our peak traffic is bi-directional. (At least to the south and northwest/Boulder, where the bulk of professional employment is. To the north and west - bedroom burbs - there's still a more traditional commuter pattern.)
     
     
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