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  #3721  
Old Posted Aug 7, 2017, 12:41 AM
khabibulin khabibulin is offline
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Originally Posted by Loco101 View Post
LOTS of people here use their garden hoses to clean driveways or water the lawn even when we're getting lots of rain. Luckily there is no shortage of water here.
My point exactly. When water is not metered (as in your area), people will use more of it than if it was metered.
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  #3722  
Old Posted Aug 7, 2017, 12:50 AM
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we have more water than we need.
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  #3723  
Old Posted Aug 7, 2017, 2:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Loco101 View Post



-we have flat rates for water and no water meters here. My water and sewer bill comes out to somewhere between $900 - $1000 per year and it has gone up a lot in the last number of years.

.
I was thinking more in terms of larger cities for this and other stuff like transit. Montreal and Quebec City vs. Toronto and Ottawa.

My flat rate for water is IIRC around 150 bucks a year. Most people I know in Ottawa pay between 60-100 bucks a month I think.

Transit passes are significantly cheaper in Montreal vs. Toronto, and even in Gatineau vs. Ottawa.
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Last edited by Acajack; Aug 7, 2017 at 2:04 PM.
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  #3724  
Old Posted Aug 7, 2017, 2:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Loco101 View Post

-support payments for children: I believe it is based entirely on income. We don't get anything because our household income is too high. I do like those types of payments that support those with low or no income.

.
Yes, but the figure I gave was for the highest income bracket. Even Montreal Canadiens players and Céline Dion are eligible for about 700 bucks per kid per year in Quebec.

Lower income brackets get more. Sometimes significantly so.
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  #3725  
Old Posted Aug 7, 2017, 2:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Loco101 View Post
I knew about tuition, daycare and auto insurance. I've heard about people in Quebec having trouble finding subsidized daycare. But in Timmins it isn't easy to find daycare that you pay for directly.

.
It can get dicey sometimes but basically everyone I know with kids ended up getting a spot eventually. And I know a lot of people.

BTW if you go for private non-subsidized daycare in Quebec you get about 50% of it back on your tax return directly. You get the 25% that the feds give everywhere in Canada plus you get another 25% (maybe a bit more) kicked in by Quebec. So if you pay 5000 bucks for daycare per kid you get 2500 back. There is a maximum you can claim but it's fairly high - about 7500 per kid or something. (Note that the subsidized daycare system has an effect of driving down private daycare prices here.) Again, this is for the highest income bracket. Other lower brackets are eligible for higher refund percentages.

There are a number of other pluses for Quebec families: bigger top-ups for maternity and paternity, a slightly longer list of free vaccinations for kids, free dental and eye care for kids, etc. In all cases they are universal as opposed to just for low-income earners.
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  #3726  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2017, 12:06 AM
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[QUOTE=Acajack;7871665]Lots of places have their own jargon.

I remember in my youth in Kingston ON the word for hydro was "PUC" - for the city's electricity provider, the Public Utilities Commission. So when looking for an apartment you'd read stuff like "2 BR incl heat and PUC".

Also in most of Quebec (everywhere except Gatineau AFAIK) apartments are described as 1 1/2, 2 1/2, 3 1/2, 4 1/2, and referred to as "un trois et demi", "un quatre et demi", etc.

The "half" is the bathroom. And the kitchen and living good as one each. So a "3 1/2" is a one-bedroom apartment in the rest of the country.

In Gatineau you see signs that say "1 CAC" or "1 ch. à c." instead.[/QUOTE

Oddly enough now that I said this I see ads and signs for a 3 et demi and a 5 et demi in one day here in Gatineau
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  #3727  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2017, 7:49 PM
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Some good news for the Burin Peninsula.

Husky confirms living quarters for White Rose project will be built in Marystown

Quote:
Husky Energy has confirmed that the living quarters for the West White Rose extension project will be constructed in Marystown by Kiewit Offshore Services.

It's the latest sign of growing momentum for the $3.2-billion offshore oil project, which will bring much-needed economic activity to the Burin Peninsula and Placentia region.

"We're very delighted," said Rick Farrell, president of Local 20 of Unifor-Marine Workers' Federation.

"Twenty-one months with no work. Our members now can have something to look forward to, hopefully before this year is out."

Husky also announced this week that the concrete gravity structure, or CGS, will be constructed at an industrial site in Placentia by a partnership that includes Newfoundland-based Pennecon Ltd. The other partners include SNC-Lavalin and Dragado Canada.

Longest period of inactivity

The yard in Marystown has been quiet since late 2015, when work on a 3,500 tonne module for the Hebron project was completed.

Farrell called it the longest stretch of inactivity at the Marystown shipyard and fabrication facility since it opened.

He expects 200 to 300 workers will be needed to construct the living quarters over a period of between 18 to 24 months.

It's all welcome news for the province's construction industry, which is shedding jobs at a rapid rate as major project investment declines from a recent historic high.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfou...town-1.4240533
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  #3728  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2017, 8:41 PM
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Bombardier Aims C Series for Europe-U.S. Routes After London City Boost

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Bombardier Inc. is pitching its C Series jetliner for trans-Atlantic operations as the Canadian planemaker pursues a new wave of orders, buoyed by the start of flights from London City airport.

The European routes operated by Deutsche Lufthansa AG’s Swiss arm should demonstrate the plane’s abilities to potential buyers and open up the possibility of service to the U.S. that would establish its long-haul credentials, C Series program head Rob Dewar said in a telephone interview. The narrow-body jet offers double the range, 25 percent more capacity and a quieter noise footprint than other planes at London City, where flights are limited by a short runway and stringent environmental curbs, Dewar said.

The appeal of the C Series -- which comes in two sizes in a range of 100 to 150 seats -- may be enhanced by further flights from London City to be offered by U.K. startup Odyssey Airlines and Geneva-based charter specialist PrivatAir, which have ordered 10 and five aircraft respectively. The biggest model can be outfitted with as many as 160 seats in a so-called high-density configuration.

Bloomberg
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  #3729  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2017, 8:42 PM
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Consumer Sentiment Soars as Canadians Shrug Off Rate Increases

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A rising currency and a red-hot labor market has sent Canadian consumer confidence to the highest in three years.

The Bloomberg Nanos Canadian Confidence Index -- a gauge based on telephone polling -- climbed to 60.5 in the week ended Aug. 4, the highest since July 2014 and close to a record.

“While the normalization of interest rates is likely to have a negative impact on household balance sheets, a stronger Canadian dollar could be perceived as another sign of a healthier economy,” said Robert Lawrie, a Bloomberg economist based in New York.

Canada is in the midst of one of its strongest growth spurts since the 2008-2009 recession, with the expansion accelerating to an above-3 percent pace over the past four quarters. That’s the fastest among G-7 countries and double what the central bank considers is Canada’s capacity to grow without fueling inflation.

The pick-up in growth includes an increase in jobs of 387,600 over the past year, the biggest 12-month gain since 2007.

Bloomberg
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  #3730  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2017, 9:54 PM
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Regina experiences driest July in 130 years

Saskatchewan's Agriculture affected causing an early half-sized harvest, less water & hay for livestock.

On a bonus, there have been very few mosquitos,
but unfortunately with the ground drying, cracking and shifting, its causing electrical fires in power lines..

Maple Creek's average day-time-high in July was 31C

Video Link
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  #3731  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2017, 11:54 PM
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Damn....that's not going to do well for the many families who work in Regina off agriculture......
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  #3732  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2017, 8:54 PM
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Last edited by ainvan; Aug 10, 2017 at 10:06 PM.
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  #3733  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2017, 9:02 PM
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That doesn't make sense.

How can Quebec, with a GDP 6X larger than Manitoba's have one quarter of Quebec's payouts but Manitoba equalization equals 11.7% while Quebec's is 50%?
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  #3734  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2017, 9:46 PM
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  #3735  
Old Posted Aug 15, 2017, 6:15 PM
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Fuck. In the Economist.

A dodgy dam in Canada’s east

Newfoundland and Labrador has a history of backing ill-conceived projects

Quote:
...

In June the provincial government revealed that the project, including a transmission line to Newfoundland, would cost C$12.7bn ($10bn) to build, more than double the original estimate of C$5bn. To pay for that, electricity rates will nearly double to 23.3 cents per kilowatt hour by 2022, twice what Canadians now pay on average. Indigenous groups that live near the dam and other people downstream worry that rotting vegetation in the reservoir will release mercury and that the construction convoys will damage roads. Three Inuit protesters were arrested in July for blocking the lorries.

Ever since Newfoundland and Labrador joined Canada in 1949, con men and credulous politicians have pushed misguided projects to reduce its dependence on natural resources. Joey Smallwood, the province’s first premier, put public money into more than a dozen ventures that went bust, including a rubber-boot factory, a cotton mill, a chocolatier and a “high-end” knitwear-maker. The Come-by-Chance oil refinery, which cost taxpayers C$42m, declared bankruptcy three years after it opened in 1973. A hydroponic cucumber greenhouse, popularly known as Peckford’s Pickle Palace (for the premier who backed it with C$22m of taxpayers’ money), went bust in 1989. The history of failed investments has left the province’s government with Canada’s biggest public debt as a share of GDP. Wayne Johnston called his novel about the province, published in 1998, “The Colony of Unrequited Dreams”.

Churchill Falls, upriver from and much bigger than Muskrat Falls, is the biggest nightmare. A private firm, the British Newfoundland Development Corporation, built it on time and on budget and sold it in 1974 to the province’s government. The problem is the contract that the government signed with its neighbour, Quebec. It obliges Newfoundland and Labrador to sell electricity at C$2 per MWh, a fraction of its current market price, until 2041. The arrangement, which Newfoundland and Labrador agreed to in part because Quebec was the nearest customer, will yield a profit of C$26bn for Quebec’s government, which sells electricity to the United States. Newfoundland and Labrador will pocket just C$2bn over the life of the project. The province has tried repeatedly to break the deal in court and lost every time. Canada’s Supreme Court will hear an appeal, the third to the highest court on various aspects of the dispute, later this year.

None of these ventures freed the province from its dependence on commodities such as lumber and iron ore and their volatile prices. Over-fishing caused the cod industry to collapse in 1992. Offshore oil production, which began in 1997, sustained the economy until 2014, when oil prices plunged. At the same time, thousands of unemployed oil workers returned to Newfoundland and Labrador from Alberta, where an energy boom had also ended.

...
https://www.economist.com/news/ameri...gy-dam-canadas
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  #3736  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2017, 12:29 AM
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In the news today, it appears Hydro-Qc is likely to be selling $8 billion worth of electricity to Ontario over the next two decades. (That deal would amount to 6% of Ontario's power consumption.)

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/201...-ligne-de-mire

If Ontario wants even more maybe we could consider getting some of the Muskrat Falls output and selling that on the other side of the Ottawa River...?
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  #3737  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2017, 3:04 AM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
In the news today, it appears Hydro-Qc is likely to be selling $8 billion worth of electricity to Ontario over the next two decades. (That deal would amount to 6% of Ontario's power consumption.)

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/201...-ligne-de-mire

If Ontario wants even more maybe we could consider getting some of the Muskrat Falls output and selling that on the other side of the Ottawa River...?
I'm all for Ontario buying electricity from Hydro-Québec since it's a great deal and from renewable sources.

I've always wished that Northern Ontario would have its own hydro system and grid. It insane that we are punished by paying high rates for mistakes made in the South. And we have much colder Winters. The recent reduction in rates mandated by the Liberal government have actually happened and my bill has been quite a bit lower. But how long will that last?
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  #3738  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2017, 10:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
In the news today, it appears Hydro-Qc is likely to be selling $8 billion worth of electricity to Ontario over the next two decades. (That deal would amount to 6% of Ontario's power consumption.)

http://www.journaldemontreal.com/201...-ligne-de-mire

If Ontario wants even more maybe we could consider getting some of the Muskrat Falls output and selling that on the other side of the Ottawa River...?
How cute! Ontario gets to double play for power that it helped build. Would Quebec have been able to build the power system they did without equalization? Doubt it, the capital spent would have been covering day to day functions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Loco101 View Post
I'm all for Ontario buying electricity from Hydro-Québec since it's a great deal and from renewable sources.

I've always wished that Northern Ontario would have its own hydro system and grid. It insane that we are punished by paying high rates for mistakes made in the South. And we have much colder Winters. The recent reduction in rates mandated by the Liberal government have actually happened and my bill has been quite a bit lower. But how long will that last?
Speaking of Quebec this man has learnt well! It's well known that southern Ontario subsidizes just about everything in the north and yet he cries fowl on one aspect where perhaps the north would be better off without it. That's the Quebec model to a tea. Subsidize us but do not dare touch what we are good at! Brilliant!
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  #3739  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2017, 12:53 PM
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Originally Posted by DrJoe View Post
How cute! Ontario gets to double play for power that it helped build. Would Quebec have been able to build the power system they did without equalization? Doubt it, the capital spent would have been covering day to day functions.]
Hydro-Québec was funded by issuing in 1963 over $300 millions worth of bonds on american markets and thus did not use any governmental money. In 1984, everything was refunded. With this capital, the society could buy all the privately-owned electricity prod. and distribution companies.
But you're free to believe whatever/whoever you want. It's Canada, eh !

End of the parenthesis.
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  #3740  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2017, 1:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Laceoflight View Post
Hydro-Québec was funded by issuing in 1963 over $300 millions worth of bonds on american markets and thus did not use any governmental money. In 1984, everything was refunded. With this capital, the society could buy all the privately-owned electricity prod. and distribution companies.
But you're free to believe whatever/whoever you want. It's Canada, eh !

End of the parenthesis.
Everything in Quebec is paid for by equalization. Don't you ever forget it.

Even the beer you had last night!
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