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  #81  
Old Posted Mar 31, 2017, 7:36 PM
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Originally Posted by SpongeG View Post
okay cool.

so outside of those few routes i don't think one can get from alberta or manitoba to the states by passenger train. The west of the US is pretty rural and sparse except for the seattle - vancouver corridor. There are no big significant equivalent cities on the US side for cities like Calgary, Regina or Winnipeg to have a relationship with, within a reasonable travel time or distance of under 200 km.

But how about religious ties? I know a few Mormons here in BC who have fairly strong ties with Utah, for example they send their kids to University there and some end up marrying Americans and then there are the whole polygamists ties between BC and Utah. I think Alberta has some of the same thing with mormons too, don't they have a big temple in Lethbridge?

There's definitely a stronger Mormon connection in the deep south of Alberta. The most famous temple is in Cardston, which is 25 km or so from the border. If you tie back to immigration, there are definitely historical US connections in southern AB. The imports from Southern Ontario struggled making a go of the dryland farming and so people with more experience were brought in from the states.

As to the general thread, despite some general cultural similarities that run N-S on the continent, IMO Candian-ness a canadian cultural regions are generally more pronounced. The substantial settlement of most of Canada occured quite differently than that in the states. There areas where you might see a decent amount of cross border commerce in certain industries, but I'd hesitiate to call most of the Cultural/Economic regions.
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  #82  
Old Posted Mar 31, 2017, 8:26 PM
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I'm not sure if this has been posted yet.


Who's Your City: Top 10 Megaregions
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/whos-you...0-megaregions/

5. Tor-Buff-Chester
Where: It runs from Toronto through Buffalo, N.Y., and Rochester, N.Y.
Population: 22 million
Economy: $530 billion
Leading sectors: Arts, finance, film, information technology
Key creative-class jobs: R&D project manager, investment banker, marketing executive

A more appropriate name for this region might be “Tor-Buff-looMon-tawa,” because this mega stretches much farther than its three anchor cities: from Waterloo and London, Ontario; eastward to Ottawa, Montreal, and Quebec City; and down to Syracuse, N.Y., Ithaca, N.Y., and Utica, N.Y., in the south. It makes this international mega the fifth-largest region in North America and the 12th-largest in the world.

10. Cascadia

Where: It stretches from Medford, Ore., and Portland, Ore., through Seattle, and into Vancouver, British Columbia
Population: 9 million
Economy: $260 billion
Leading sectors: Software, e-commerce, global retail, tourism
Key creative-class jobs: Aerospace and forestry engineer, software developer
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  #83  
Old Posted Mar 31, 2017, 8:45 PM
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Those numbers for economy don't look right. How can a region of 22 million only have a $530 billion GDP or one of 9 million only have a $260 billion GDP? Seattle's GDP on its own is higher than $260 billion.
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  #84  
Old Posted Mar 31, 2017, 9:30 PM
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Ya $260 GDP for Cascadia is definitely not correct.

2014 Metro GDP numbers, all in USD:
  1. Seattle: $301 billion
  2. Portland $159 billion
  3. Vancouver $110 billion

So at the very least it's $570 billion for Cascadia, not including the secondary cities. I can't find GDP numbers for upsate but I would expect the Quebec, Ontario, NY corridor to be around double that.
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  #85  
Old Posted Mar 31, 2017, 9:32 PM
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Originally Posted by TorontoDrew View Post
I'm not sure if this has been posted yet.


Who's Your City: Top 10 Megaregions
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/whos-you...0-megaregions/

5. Tor-Buff-Chester
Where: It runs from Toronto through Buffalo, N.Y., and Rochester, N.Y.
Population: 22 million
Economy: $530 billion
Leading sectors: Arts, finance, film, information technology
Key creative-class jobs: R&D project manager, investment banker, marketing executive
I lived in Southern Ontario for 25 years and I've never been to Rochester, NY. I actually only knew two or three Torontonians who ever went, and they went because they're urban nerds who were interested in Rust Belt urban exploration.

If these are the ties that Toronto has to Rochester, I can only imagine how strong the ties are between Montreal and Utica.
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  #86  
Old Posted Mar 31, 2017, 9:36 PM
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Originally Posted by hipster duck View Post
I lived in Southern Ontario for 25 years and I've never been to Rochester, NY. I actually only knew two or three Torontonians who ever went, and they went because they're urban nerds who were interested in Rust Belt urban exploration.

If these are the ties that Toronto has to Rochester, I can only imagine how strong the ties are between Montreal and Utica.
If these are the ties that make Rochester and Toronto a "megaregion", than Winnipeg can definitely grouped with Minneapolis. I'm sure close to half of Manitobans go to Grand Forks, Fargo and Minneapolis annually.

Last edited by balletomane; Mar 31, 2017 at 11:42 PM.
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  #87  
Old Posted Mar 31, 2017, 10:22 PM
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Originally Posted by hipster duck View Post
I lived in Southern Ontario for 25 years and I've never been to Rochester, NY. I actually only knew two or three Torontonians who ever went, and they went because they're urban nerds who were interested in Rust Belt urban exploration.

If these are the ties that Toronto has to Rochester, I can only imagine how strong the ties are between Montreal and Utica.
I've lived in Southern Ontario my whole life and funny enough, Rochester is actually the only city in the US I've ever been to. Drove there for a concert, crashed in a cheap motel, drove back. Maybe a total of 16 hours in the United States, half of them sleeping.

I'm a strange Canadian.. I've travelled extensively around Europe, having spent multiple days apiece in England, Scotland, Ireland, France, Germany, Poland, Czechia, and Croatia, but I've never really been to the USA.
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  #88  
Old Posted Mar 31, 2017, 10:27 PM
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Originally Posted by leftcoaster View Post
ya $260 gdp for cascadia is definitely not correct.

2014 metro gdp numbers, all in usd:
  1. seattle: $301 billion
  2. portland $159 billion
  3. vancouver $110 billion

so at the very least it's $570 billion for cascadia, not including the secondary cities. I can't find gdp numbers for upsate but i would expect the quebec, ontario, ny corridor to be around double that.
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  #89  
Old Posted Mar 31, 2017, 11:43 PM
balletomane balletomane is offline
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Originally Posted by hipster duck View Post
I lived in Southern Ontario for 25 years and I've never been to Rochester, NY. I actually only knew two or three Torontonians who ever went, and they went because they're urban nerds who were interested in Rust Belt urban exploration.

If these are the ties that Toronto has to Rochester, I can only imagine how strong the ties are between Montreal and Utica.
Maybe its a case were more Rochesterians would visit Toronto as opposed to the reverse, Toronto being a much bigger city and all.
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  #90  
Old Posted Mar 31, 2017, 11:48 PM
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Originally Posted by balletomane View Post
Maybe its a case were more Rochesterians would visit Toronto as opposed to the reverse, Toronto being a much bigger city and all.
People in Montréal go to Plattsburgh.

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  #91  
Old Posted Apr 1, 2017, 12:26 AM
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Originally Posted by GreaterMontréal View Post
People in Montréal go to Plattsburgh.

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Being only an hour apart from each other, Plattsburgh and Montreal are surely much more integrated than Toronto and Rochester, which are 3 hours apart.
I'm not familiar with the regional economics, but Plattsburgh being the location of "Montreal's US airport", would be reason enough for Montrealers to go to Plattsburgh, yes?
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  #92  
Old Posted Apr 1, 2017, 1:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeftCoaster View Post
Ya $260 GDP for Cascadia is definitely not correct.

2014 Metro GDP numbers, all in USD:
  1. Seattle: $301 billion
  2. Portland $159 billion
  3. Vancouver $110 billion

So at the very least it's $570 billion for Cascadia, not including the secondary cities. I can't find GDP numbers for upsate but I would expect the Quebec, Ontario, NY corridor to be around double that.
GDP and economy are different though.
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  #93  
Old Posted Apr 1, 2017, 1:40 AM
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Originally Posted by balletomane View Post
Being only an hour apart from each other, Plattsburgh and Montreal are surely much more integrated than Toronto and Rochester, which are 3 hours apart.
I'm not familiar with the regional economics, but Plattsburgh being the location of "Montreal's US airport", would be reason enough for Montrealers to go to Plattsburgh, yes?
Other than cheap US flights (to a select few destinations) and shopping (now hurt by the falling Canadian dollar), I'd be surprised that most Montrealers would even consider going to Plattsburgh. Why would they bother with the hassle of the border?

IMO, people tend to gravitate towards larger cities than to smaller places, unless you have a cottage or something of the like.

For instance, I'd expect that more people from Windsor go to Detroit than the other way around, excepting those in the 19-20 age group who want to party.

Or to use another example, not many Torontonians (aside from Leafs fans who want tickets they can afford) go to Buffalo. Toronto has everything you might need/want in a city without the hassle of driving 150ish kilometers down the QEW. Now, if you're talking Torontonians going to New York City, that's a different ballgame.
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  #94  
Old Posted Apr 1, 2017, 1:50 AM
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Originally Posted by wave46 View Post
Other than cheap US flights (to a select few destinations) and shopping (now hurt by the falling Canadian dollar), I'd be surprised that most Montrealers would even consider going to Plattsburgh. Why would they bother with the hassle of the border?

IMO, people tend to gravitate towards larger cities than to smaller places, unless you have a cottage or something of the like.

For instance, I'd expect that more people from Windsor go to Detroit than the other way around, excepting those in the 19-20 age group who want to party.

Or to use another example, not many Torontonians (aside from Leafs fans who want tickets they can afford) go to Buffalo. Toronto has everything you might need/want in a city without the hassle of driving 150ish kilometers down the QEW. Now, if you're talking Torontonians going to New York City, that's a different ballgame.
This is not entirely true in the case of Winnipeg. Many Winnipeggers go to Grand Forks for shopping for a weekend trip. Young families also often go there because the nearest waterpark is located there, a Canad Inns, for a weekend getaway. Oddly, few people from Grand Forks come up to Winnipeg, but this is probably because they'd go to Fargo or Minneapolis instead.
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  #95  
Old Posted Apr 1, 2017, 2:05 AM
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Originally Posted by balletomane View Post
This is not entirely true in the case of Winnipeg. Many Winnipeggers go to Grand Forks for shopping for a weekend trip. Young families also often go there because the nearest waterpark is located there, a Canad Inns, for a weekend getaway. Oddly, few people from Grand Forks come up to Winnipeg, but this is probably because they'd go to Fargo or Minneapolis instead.
Winnipeg might be the exception then? It has been my experience that unless you're going to see family/do something outdoorsy or specific to the region, that people tend to leave the smaller city/town to go to a bigger one.

I could see how the US border would impair people from going north to Winnipeg - a lot of Americans do not have passports and won't bother with the hassle of getting one to go to Winnipeg. Easier just to go to Minneapolis.
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  #96  
Old Posted Apr 1, 2017, 2:10 AM
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Winnipeg might be the exception then? It has been my experience that unless you're going to see family/do something outdoorsy or specific to the region, that people tend to leave the smaller city/town to go to a bigger one.

I could see how the US border would impair people from going north to Winnipeg - a lot of Americans do not have passports and won't bother with the hassle of getting one to go to Winnipeg. Easier just to go to Minneapolis.
Winnipeg may be the exception to the rule. Most other major Canadian cities have a larger American city not too far away that they have a degree to integration with or they are too far from the border (like Alberta and Saskatchewan's principal cities) to have any relevant cross-border integration.
I'm sure a good number of Winnipeggers have been to Grand Forks more times than they've been to Regina, the nearest Canadian CMA.
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  #97  
Old Posted Apr 1, 2017, 9:07 AM
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Originally Posted by balletomane View Post
Being only an hour apart from each other, Plattsburgh and Montreal are surely much more integrated than Toronto and Rochester, which are 3 hours apart.
I'm not familiar with the regional economics, but Plattsburgh being the location of "Montreal's US airport", would be reason enough for Montrealers to go to Plattsburgh, yes?
Yes.
Montreal / Saint-Jean / Plattsburgn NY and Burlington VT are linked in many ways. The main one being the airports.

There is a lot of canadian shopping on the other side of the border in Plattsburgh or on Church St., Burlington. Students are coming here in Mtl for the party or the studies. There's economic cooperation (The Excellence Triangle between Plattsburgh, Burlington and Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu), trans-border tourism (Richelieu / Lake Champlain bikeways, the Lake Champlain Cyclist Circuit and the Grand Tour cycliste Desjardins - yearly sports events). The Lake Placid Winter Olympic Games were another good example of cooperation between Canada and the U.S.A. for example for sports facilities and transportation of the tourists (with the CP and the Canadian Atlantic, from Montreal). The american-side ski resorts (White Face, Smuggler's Notch, Jay Peak...) are very popular amongst Montrealers, very common destinations for a day or a weekend. The natural parks too (Green Mountains, Adirondaks, Ausable Chasm...) The 3 cities also share a common radio station, WBTZ 99.9 FM. specialized in alternative music. The Champlain Valley Wine Trail is also popular (QC's Haut-Richelieu region, VT and Upstate NY). Quebec is, today, Vermont's first commercial partner. Hydro-Quebec provides electricity to a large part of this state also. There is also a strong cooperation for the quality of Lake Champlain waters, which is menaced today however.

There's also history : the whole Lake Champlain area was settled and fortified by the French/Canadiens for the defense of Ville-Marie. Lots of these historic places became parks in today's U.S.A ; fort Sainte-Anne, Fort Saint-Frédéric (Crown Point), Fort Carillon (Ticonderoga), Fort de la Bêtise (Montgomery). They are the natural counterparts to Quebec's forts Chambly, Sainte-Thèrèse, Saint-Jean and de l'île-aux-Noix (Lennox), along the Richelieu river. There were epic naval battles in this corridor : the Lake Champlain Battle (1814), the fort Saint-Jean siege (from Sept. 6 to Nov. 3, 1775), the Île-aux-Noix battles (1760, 1775, 1812)...

Canada's main trade corridor was Montreal - Saint-Jean - Lake Champlain - Hudson Canal - Hudson river - NYC for a long time, which explains why Canada's first railroad was built between Montreal and Saint-Jean in 1836, why Saint-Jean had American customs and consulate quite early, and also the latter construction of Chambly canal.

Last edited by Laceoflight; Apr 1, 2017 at 9:42 AM.
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  #98  
Old Posted Apr 1, 2017, 11:54 AM
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Originally Posted by wave46 View Post
Other than cheap US flights (to a select few destinations) and shopping (now hurt by the falling Canadian dollar), I'd be surprised that most Montrealers would even consider going to Plattsburgh. Why would they bother with the hassle of the border?

IMO, people tend to gravitate towards larger cities than to smaller places, unless you have a cottage or something of the like.

For instance, I'd expect that more people from Windsor go to Detroit than the other way around, excepting those in the 19-20 age group who want to party.
Or to use another example, not many Torontonians (aside from Leafs fans who want tickets they can afford) go to Buffalo. Toronto has everything you might need/want in a city without the hassle of driving 150ish kilometers down the QEW. Now, if you're talking Torontonians going to New York City, that's a different ballgame.
There is a lot of back and forth between both cities, its not just one sided. Go to any good restaurant in Windsor, and you will find lots of Americans. Windsor/Detroit is much more integrated than any other border region, as it is essentially one big metro that happens to be split by an international border. Much different from cities that are more than an hour away from each other.
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  #99  
Old Posted Apr 1, 2017, 12:54 PM
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What degree of integration is there between smaller communities that lie immediately across the border from one another like,
Emerson-Pembina (MB/ND) pop. 1,000
Baudette-Rainy River (ON/MN) pop. 2,000
Fort Frances-International Falls (ON/MN) pop. 14,000
Edmunston-Madawaska (NB/ME) pop. 20,000

Because these cross-border communities are similar in size to one another, does this mean they would have little interaction, except the fact that they could wake up in the morning and wave hello to their southern neighbours?
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  #100  
Old Posted Apr 1, 2017, 1:03 PM
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Southern Essex county (Leamington, Kingsville and Pelee Island) is pretty connected to the Ohio Islands and Sandusky. There is ferry service between all of them, and lots of cottages in Essex County are owned by Ohio residents. There is also a lot of pleasure boating in the region going back and forth. The wine region of Essex County is also very popular for Ohio residents to enjoy, being so close!
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