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  #141  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2017, 2:42 PM
Yofie Yofie is offline
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Originally Posted by Martin Mtl View Post
/\ It doesn't change the point you're making, but just to be accurate, Montreal-Boston is 5 hours. I do it often enough to know.
Depends on how fast one drives and/or how long one stops on the highway each time. The way my family and I drive, at 100-120 km/h, it takes 6 hours or maybe just a drop less (not counting traffic jams or stopping at the border).
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  #142  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2017, 2:45 PM
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These are good points, although I do find that Ottawa has slowly but surely drifted towards Toronto's orbit, and away from its traditional alignment with Montreal.
I guess, then, that in the era when Montreal was larger than Toronto (up until the 1970s or so), a division of the Quebec City-Windsor corridor into two separate and discrete megalopolises (Toronto/southern Ontario and Ottawa/Montreal/Quebec City) would have made more complete sense than nowadays?
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  #143  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2017, 3:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Yofie View Post
Depends on how fast one drives and/or how long one stops on the highway each time. The way my family and I drive, at 100-120 km/h, it takes 6 hours or maybe just a drop less (not counting traffic jams or stopping at the border).
It's just less than 500 km from downtown to downtown though. With minimal stops and a bit of luck at the border you should be able to do it in about 5 hours.
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  #144  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2017, 3:11 PM
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Drawing a blank here. I just gauge it by the fact that you no longer here about people driving to Montreal for dinner, as you did when I moved to Ottawa in the early '80s.
Really? It seems to me that Montreal has evolved more into "the big city of Quebec/French Canada" as opposed to "the/a big Canadian city" in recent decades. As a result most people in Ottawa are less likely to have family or connections in Montreal, or to move there for various reasons, than they used to.

And that similar links to Toronto have ramped up.

Also the provinces (all of them, not just ON and QC) have tended to grow more powerful over time and have become increasingly self-contained entities when it comes to how their residents live their lives. This also pushes Ottawa more into Toronto's orbit.
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  #145  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2017, 3:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Yofie View Post
I guess, then, that in the era when Montreal was larger than Toronto (up until the 1970s or so), a division of the Quebec City-Windsor corridor into two separate and discrete megalopolises (Toronto/southern Ontario and Ottawa/Montreal/Quebec City) would have made more complete sense than nowadays?
Yes and no.

What would make more sense is a shaded area over Ottawa where it's partly in Montreal's colour, and partly in Toronto's colour.

But once you get past the outskirts of Ottawa going east (or even cross the river going north into Gatineau), Toronto and the Golden Horseshoe don't exert that much influence anymore.

Montreal-Quebec City as part of a single megalopolis with Toronto as its heart doesn't make much sense.
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  #146  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2017, 3:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Montreal-Quebec City as part of a single megalopolis with Toronto as its heart doesn't make much sense.
I was never talking about a single megalopolis, with Toronto/the Golden Horseshoe as its heart, encompassing Montreal/Quebec City. (Though many geographers have talked about it as such.) I like to think of two megalopolises, one with Toronto as its heart and one with Montreal as its heart, that happen to be next to each other. Perhaps Kingston is the traditional boundary between those two, and that boundary has been expanded in recent decades to include Ottawa also (as per the posters here saying that Ottawa has gravitated away from Montreal and towards Toronto).
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  #147  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2017, 3:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Yofie View Post
I was never talking about a single megalopolis, with Toronto/the Golden Horseshoe as its heart, encompassing Montreal/Quebec City. (Though many geographers have talked about it as such.) I like to think of two megalopolises, one with Toronto as its heart and one with Montreal as its heart, that happen to be next to each other. Perhaps Kingston is the traditional boundary between those two, and that boundary has been expanded in recent decades to include Ottawa also (as per the posters here saying that Ottawa has gravitated away from Montreal and towards Toronto).
This is basically what has been described as the Quebec-Windsor Corridor since the 1970s IIRC.
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  #148  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2017, 3:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Really? It seems to me that Montreal has evolved more into "the big city of Quebec/French Canada" as opposed to "the/a big Canadian city" in recent decades. As a result most people in Ottawa are less likely to have family or connections in Montreal, or to move there for various reasons, than they used to.

And that similar links to Toronto have ramped up.

Also the provinces (all of them, not just ON and QC) have tended to grow more powerful over time and have become increasingly self-contained entities when it comes to how their residents live their lives. This also pushes Ottawa more into Toronto's orbit.
I can't say I've ever heard anyone here comment on that, or indicate that it makes a difference to their choice of places to visit. You still get random positive observations about good places to visit in Montreal (ie the tourist perspective). The decline of family connections is likely a factor, however.
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  #149  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2017, 4:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Yofie View Post
Depends on how fast one drives and/or how long one stops on the highway each time. The way my family and I drive, at 100-120 km/h, it takes 6 hours or maybe just a drop less (not counting traffic jams or stopping at the border).
Have you done it recently though? They just completed Freeway 35 from St-Jean-sur-Richelieu all the way to ... I don't recall exactly where (Pike River?) but it's getting really close to junction with the divided highway 133 in Philipsburg.

That's got to shave quite a bit of time from the trip.

Also, the wait at customs really matters - I recall the 133/I-89 customs are pretty bad. To go to Boston from the Townships, I always leave the freeway one exit before the border, and go through the old customs in the villages of Stanstead and Derby Line. It's MUCH faster. The big customs on the interstate (A-55/I-91) are horrible; long wait times, unfriendly agents.
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  #150  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2017, 4:21 PM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
Have you done it recently though? They just completed Freeway 35 from St-Jean-sur-Richelieu all the way to ... I don't recall exactly where (Pike River?) but it's getting really close to junction with the divided highway 133 in Philipsburg.

That's got to shave quite a bit of time from the trip.
I have to admit that I haven't gone to Boston in the past year and a half or so, but when I last passed through the border area along I-89/QC-133 this past January, as well as in the past year or two, A-35 had already been extended up to a certain point around Pike River. There was thus only a bit of the 3-lane QC-133 to go through (less than before).
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