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  #81  
Old Posted Jun 11, 2004, 5:53 PM
wrightchr wrightchr is offline
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i really hope not Dave...it will be corruption at it's worst if this sceme goes through. piss poor on PSU's part! they have an obligation to the residents of Carlisle, and to Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to remain an institution that is represenative of the student body it serves. closing up shop and moving opperations to a centralized campus will furter degrade the diversity and outreach of the institution. i can't see how anyone who has an understanding in logic and history would seek to move a school with it's roots in a community, almost as old as this country. DSL is one of America's oldest institutions and it deserves to stay right where it is.
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  #82  
Old Posted Jun 11, 2004, 10:47 PM
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  #83  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2004, 6:16 PM
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A MUCH better plan IMO.

Penn State proposes 2 campuses for school

Dickinson board to study last-minute deal

Saturday, June 12, 2004
BY ELIZABETH GIBSON
Of Our Carlisle Bureau

CARLISLE - Just as members of The Dickinson School of Law's governors board were ready to say whether the school should be rebuilt in Carlisle or move to State College, Penn State President Graham Spanier suggested they do both.

In a surprising last-minute offer, Spanier gave the board a proposal for a two-campus operation. He said it would be the nation's first unified law school with two locations.

Spanier said the proposal was put together just days ago, but promises to be ground-breaking.

"This is going to be on the forefront of legal education nationally," Spanier said.


The idea of a dual campus had surfaced earlier but that plan called for the main law campus and student body to be in State College and a public law center that would cater more to local and state officials to be housed in Carlisle.

Gov. Ed Rendell joined Spanier in presenting the plan to the board yesterday, and Rendell pledged $10 million toward a renovation of Dickinson's Carlisle campus.

Ten million dollars in state money, $10 million from Penn State and $5 million gained through locally sponsored grants and donations would be used to renovate Carlisle's Trickett Hall to house 300 students, 20 professors and a full program enhanced by continued public law internships.

University Park would get a $60 million law school facility that would hold 450 students, 30 faculty and a law program that would highlight chances for students to specialize their law degree in business, finance, science and other areas.

Both campuses would be equipped with the latest technology for interaction, thereby rendering the distance between the campuses insignificant, Spanier said.

Students would have the chance to split their study time between Carlisle and State College, he said.

Board Chairman LeRoy Zimmerman said he would urge his board to support the proposal.

"I think they're very interested in it," Zimmerman said.

He said the board has a lot of questions about how faculty, administrators and other law school resources would be shared between the two campuses. No member has dismissed the proposal, he said.

"There are many issues that need to be threaded through," Zimmerman said.

As a result of the development, the board won't be ready to make a decision on the proposal today, he said.

Nearly every board member, including Homeland Security Director Tom Ridge, was expected to attend the board's meeting today.

But, instead of casting a landmark vote as had been expected, members will begin to sift through the pros and cons of a two-campus school.

The proposal would set aside seven months of local furor over the possibility of losing the law school to State College.

It could also bring to an end academic arguments over whether law students benefit more from the plentiful internship opportunities they get in and around Carlisle than they would from being exposed to many new areas of research and study on a large university campus.

"I think it's a win-win in every aspect," Zimmerman said.

"It's almost historic in terms of the opportunities it presents," said Dickinson Dean Philip McConnaughay.

"It will be of enormous benefit to our law school, our students and our community," he said.
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  #84  
Old Posted Jun 13, 2004, 2:33 AM
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I just noticed that there is even more development downtown!!! Did you see/hear about it yet, Chris? Harrisburg Hospital (Pinnacle Health) is building a nice laboratory services bldg. in the new ER parking lot and construction has already begun. The rendering is on the sign, and it looks to be at least 3-4 stories. I didn't look too hard, though, because I was at the red light and it turned green right away LOL. Next time I am down there I will stop and take a real good look, though.

It's funny, they just spent all that money when they moved the ER from the front to the back of the building (SMART move btw). Now they are tearing the lot up already LOL

So much good stuff going on down there/in the area!!! :carrot:
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  #85  
Old Posted Jun 13, 2004, 3:27 PM
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Law school to stay in Carlisle

Board to consider dual-campus proposal

Sunday, June 13, 2004
BY ELIZABETH GIBSON
Of Our Carlisle Bureau

CARLISLE - A plan to move The Dickinson School of Law out of Carlisle ended yesterday.

The school's board of governors voted unanimously in a closed-door session to consider building a second, $60 million law campus in State College while upgrading the Carlisle site for about $25 million. That decision is expected to be made by Aug. 15.

"The decision to close Dickinson in Carlisle is off the table. The school is not moving," said Tom Ridge, Homeland Security director and a Dickinson board member, after yesterday's three-hour meeting.

The board meeting had been expected to end with a vote on whether Dickinson would stay in Carlisle or move to State College. Penn State President Graham Spanier changed the agenda when he put a two-campus proposal on the table Friday night.

That followed months of a moving-or-staying debate, during which some of the board's 35 members had lobbied others to reject the proposal to move to State College.

Spanier denied that withdrawing the original proposal was a loss for Penn State.

"It's a plan B that I think turns out to be the best plan," Spanier said.

He also denied charges from many alumni and local officials that despite promises to keep Dickinson in Carlisle, Penn State had planned to move Dickinson to State College since the schools announced their merger in 1997.

"None of us ever contemplated we would be at this point," Spanier said.

Discussions opened up in November to improve the law school or move it because the campus needs renovations and its national ranking has slipped.

Ridge praised the decision to keep the school in Carlisle and said board members would keep an "open mind" as they consider the latest option.

"This is a great law school, both for the education it offers and the opportunities it provides," he said. In the midstate, students have access to county, state and federal courts as well as job opportunities at the many law firms, he said.

The new plan would educate 300 Dickinson students at Trickett Hall in Carlisle and 450 students at a law facility in State College.

The board of governors' meeting was closed to the public, but board members said later that the talks inside Trickett Hall were not heated.

"Lawyers don't necessarily yell and scream. There were long speeches with lots of words filled with emotion," board member Jason Kutulakis said.

He said Ridge did not deliver prepared remarks. "He participated. He asked questions," Kutulakis said.

There was a feeling of celebration after the vote and one of relief that the board and Penn State are "united in going forward with what's best for students," he said.

The Patriot-News and The Sentinel of Carlisle have tried to open board meetings to the public since last fall. The newspapers have asked the state Supreme Court to permit an appeal of a Commonwealth Court decision that allows the board to meet behind closed doors.

Outside the meeting, some board members who opposed a move said they think the new plan is a compromise that can work -- with revisions.

Despite mixed feelings about the importance of national ranking, members said opportunities with a two-campus school could boost Dickinson's third-tier rating. They welcomed a plan that would meet the school's goals without uprooting it, but said they would insist on a guarantee that Dickinson could not be transplanted.

"There'd have to be a lot of safeguards built into the arrangement," board member Hubert X. Gilroy said.

Member Robert M. Frey, who was chairman of Dickinson's trustees when the school merged with Penn State, said he still has questions. But he's sure the campus with the greatest number of students will be perceived as the main campus, he said.

Board Chairman LeRoy Zimmerman said the arrangement would not resemble law schools like Widener University School of Law, which has a branch campus in Harrisburg.

He is to choose board members this week who will study the plan and give a report this summer. But he said it has already been decided that there would be one budget for both schools, which would "take care of the issue of whether [Carlisle] would be a second-class place."

Dean Philip McConnaughay said the two programs would have to be equal to boost rankings. He said Dickinson would be rated using one consolidated report that reflected both schools.

If one campus had fewer resources than the other, "it would sink the ship," he said.

McConnaughay said the 15-to-1 student teacher ratio proposed under the two-campus plan is an improvement over Dickinson's current 19-to-1 ratio.

Gov. Ed Rendell pledged $10 million toward renovating Dickinson's Carlisle campus. That would be matched by $10 million from Penn State. Local grants and financing could raise $5 million or more.
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  #86  
Old Posted Jun 13, 2004, 3:29 PM
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They better not push too hard about this.


Plan doesn't satisfy state, local leaders

Sunday, June 13, 2004
BY JOE ELIAS
Of Our Carlisle Bureau

CARLISLE - The latest proposal for The Dickinson School of Law didn't sit well with local officials, who are concerned about the long-term impact a dual campus would have on Carlisle.

State Sen. Hal Mowery, R-Cumberland, had hoped Dickinson's board of governors would keep the law school in Carlisle, rather than moving all or part of it to State College. Instead, the board is sitting on a proposal that would renovate the Carlisle site and build a campus in State College.

"There are just an awful lot of frustrations in going for a dual campus, as I see it," Mowery said.

He said he is concerned that the proposed $25 million in state funding to renovate Dickinson would be in jeopardy if the school opens a second campus.

"That money was for the law school to stay here, not a second campus," Mowery said. "That would put a kink in the whole thing."

Gov. Ed Rendell has since promised $10 million in state funding for Dickinson's Carlisle campus if a second school is created.

While state Rep. Will Gabig, R-Carlisle, said he is pleased the law school will not move from Carlisle, he said he is skeptical of what a second campus would mean in the long term.

"I don't think a double campus makes sense," he said. "Sooner or later it's going to come down to one or the other."

Carlisle Mayor Kirk Wilson said the last-minute proposal by Penn State President Graham Spanier didn't ease his mind at all.

"I don't feel any better about this than I did a few days ago," Wilson said. "Nothing has really changed."

A local task force of business and community leaders issued a statement saying it was "potentially supportive" of the dual campus concept, provided the two campuses are treated equally academically and financially.

Frank Rankin, Carlisle Borough Council president, said he is "perplexed" by the proposal and wants to hear more details about how it would work and the impact on the Carlisle campus.

"I'm pleased that Dickinson will stay in Carlisle," Rankin said. "But for how long and at what strength? Those are the big questions I'm sure will be on everybody's mind."

Wilson questioned the process. "Since the beginning, President Spanier and the law school dean had an agenda," he said.

Spanier has said the dual campus concept would allow students to take advantage of opportunities available to them at Penn State's main campus and answer any concerns of the Carlisle community.
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  #87  
Old Posted Jun 13, 2004, 3:37 PM
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Remember the article I posted earlier in the week about this? Well here's some good news!!!


Council suspends dining permit fee

Sunday, June 13, 2004
From staff reports

CARLISLE - The town's restaurant owners won't have to pay anything to put their tables on the sidewalks anymore.

Borough Council has dropped the $50 annual fee for outside dining permits.

"Elimination of this might encourage more establishments to open their doors outside," council President Franklin Rankin said. "That might attract more people."

Restaurants still will have to secure sidewalk cafe permits, at no cost.

**********

And more Carlisle news:

*Normally I wouldn't post something like this, but because of some of the dates of these structures, I find it simply amazing.

Carlisle honors historic preservationists

Sunday, June 13, 2004
BY DAN MILLER
Of Our Carlisle Bureau

CARLISLE - If you want to know what historic preservation ought to look like, Carlisle has some suggestions.

The Borough Council on Thursday presented the 2003 Historic Preservation Awards to several owners of property in the historic district. The awards recognize the best examples of historic preservation in the district over the past year.
  • Paul and Deb Snyder received the Residential Award for an addition to their home at 201 E. Pomfret St. The Snyders received a preservation award last year for renovations to the multifamily building at 200 E. Pomfret St., across the street from their home.
  • John and Louise Broujos received the Non-Residential Award for restoring the Ephraim Blaine house at 4 N. Hanover St. The borough also recognized architectural consultant Stephen O. Smith and contractor/artisan Peter C. Eckelt for their contributions to the restoration.
  • Mary C. Roell received the Signs Award for her Bedford Street Antiques business at 44 N. Bedford St.
  • A special award was presented to Christian S. Allen for overall maintenance of historic features at 57 W. Pomfret St.
Award recipients have been picked each year since 1990 by the Carlisle Historical and Architectural Review Board. The board recommends to council on applications from owners seeking to make changes to the outside of their properties in the historic district. Council approval is required for such changes.

"The work that people do on their historic buildings in the historic district is very important for the appearance of downtown Carlisle and for Carlisle's overall development as an all around healthy community," said James D. Flower Jr., board chairman.

Flower said how competitive the awards are depends on the quality of historic preservation work being done in the district from year to year.

While all the projects being recognized demonstrate quality, he said, the Broujos' work stands above them all.

"That's just a remarkable restoration," Flower said.

The Broujos property, home of Broujos & Gilroy law offices, until last year housed three separate addresses -- 4, 6 and 8 N. Hanover -- and was known by a late addition Colonial Revival storefront. Although workers at first intended just to repair the facade, the major renovation was undertaken after Eckelt discovered two steel I-beams inserted during a 1930s renovation were potentially faulty.

Smith helped to restore the building to its 1794 appearance, including replacing two storefront windows with brick piers and three windows to match the 18th century look.
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  #88  
Old Posted Jun 13, 2004, 3:59 PM
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Anybody going to the Brewer's Fest this weekend? I know you won't be, harrisburger, as you are not of age yet. :nono:

SOMETHING'S BREWING

Harrisburg beer maker barrels ahead

Sunday, June 13, 2004

Ruff, ruff, ruff ... and the sound of 16 toenails moves across a concrete floor in your direction. You have opened the gray steel door of a large white warehouse, but it's not the site of the Harrisburg dog show.

Try Troegs Brewing Co. in Harrisburg. The first of many friendly greetings is from a German shorthaired pointer named Porter, punctuating the family oriented culture at the brewery.

Brothers Chris and John Trogner, Cumberland Valley High School graduates, started Troegs in Harrisburg seven years ago. Last year, the company produced about 5,500 barrels of beer and expects to reach 7,000 this year.

The brothers started the business with a Krones bottling machine, a few employees and the dream of creating beers that reflected their lifestyle. Beers with more flavor and character than a traditional brew.

"We are more of the artisan bakers compared to the Goliath mass-produced beer," Chris Trogner said.

In 1997, the company was able to produce 150 to 200 cases of beer a week. Today, after selling enough beer to purchase a couple of secondhand machines to boost productivity, it bottles 90 to 120 bottles per minute, three to five days a week, yielding 600 to 700 cases weekly.

Chris heads the marketing and sales department. John taught the trade to brewer Chris Brugger, whom they found working in a home-brew store in Carlisle.

John, a multitasking brewer, welder, plumber and electrician, spends most of his time overseeing the bottler, which he calls "the heart and soul of brewing," and on maintenance of the equipment.

Chris, 30, and John, 32, have fun coming up with names and sketches for new creations, such as Troegenator, Doublebock and The Mad Elf, a seasonal brew.

Their newest employee is Dan Gerstner, a microbiologist who worked for the state Department of Agriculture for 10 years.

Working as a machinist by day, Gerstner stops in to help with quality control, which Chris said "is one of the first steps we needed to continue growing."

WHAT'S GOING ON

Troegs Breweing Co. will bring the microwbrewing industry to town for the Harrisburg Brewer's Fest.
  • When - Saturday (19th) from 4-9 p.m.
  • Where - Locust St., between 2nd and 3rd streets.
  • Who - 34 breweeries from across the mid-Atlantic region will be represented, along with live music from Quagmire Swim Team, Fink's Constant and God Bless Our Mobile Home.
  • Benefit - Proceeds from the event will go to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation of Central Pennsylvania.
  • Tickets/Information - Reserved tickets are $25, and tickets at the door cost $30. Tcikets may be purchased online at www.troegs.com or by calling (717) 671-4000.
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  #89  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2004, 4:05 PM
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sweet articles Dave...i've been out of town until this morning, so it's nice to catch up on everything. i heard the DSL is staying i'm very happy about that decision; however, the two campus idea has merit, but i'm still worried this is a ploy to build a centralized campus and slowly divert funds, resources, and eventually ALL the students from Carlisle to PSU. i hope that is not their (Spanier and PSU) intention. but it seems as if the university and law school are considering more interfaces with curriculm, which is what i suggested they do with the 60+ million in funds.

i noticed the new laboratory going on at 2nd and chestnut streets a while back, but i think it's only gonna be 2 levels high. i could be wrong though. i think this is just another step in consolidating services at HBG Hosptial, so PinnacleHealth can vacate Poly Clinic eventually. it's been a long term goal for the hospital to strip Poly Clinic and move services and hospital beds to other facilities. i know the mayor has been trying to come up with new ideas for redevelopment of the poly clinic campus, including part of the new university. also, hacc has just added on-site services at poly clinic, so maybe it will continue to be around in the near distant future. IMO i think this area needs more hospitals, not less of them.

i'm going to the brewersfest...i already bought tickets for my girlfriend and i. i'm hoping to get some of my friends to go as well. i'm sure some of them will...maybe get something to eat afterwards or do the bar crawl scene DT should be interesting...i might be walking home to Camp Hill...lol. are you going Dave?
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  #90  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2004, 9:19 PM
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I was wondering where you were at, Chris. I agree on your points with PSU. Here is yet another article on it from today's paper:


Proposal to split law school questioned

Resource drain feared in law-school splitting plan

Monday, June 14, 2004
BY MARY KLAUS
Of The Patriot-News

CARLISLE - As a Penn State graduate, Robert Michaels considers State College a good party town "with a student atmosphere and lots of nightlife."

As a Dickinson School of Law third-year student, Michaels doesn't want to see half of his law school moving to Penn State's main campus.

"There's a fear among students that splitting the law school will drain resources in Carlisle in favor of State College," he said yesterday.

The law school's Board of Governors voted over the weekend to consider building a second, $60-million law campus in State College by 2008, while also upgrading The Dickinson School of Law here for about $25 million.

The board will vote on the proposal by Aug. 15.

Earlier, the board had considered moving the law school to State College. Penn State President Graham Spanier had said a move to State College would enhance the law school's academic reputation, and it would be easier to build a modern facility.

The proposal to move the law school to State College is now off the table, board members said.

The new proposal emerged over the weekend, just as the board was expected to vote on whether the law school would move. The law school -- which is not affiliated with Dickinson College -- merged with Penn State in 2000.

A dozen people interviewed in Carlisle yesterday agreed that the school should stay in Carlisle and not be split between the borough and State College.

"I'm concerned that if the school is split, the Penn State main campus would draw energy and resources from the law school here," said Pamela Lubold of Harrisburg, who works at the Governor's Office of General Counsel. "Over time, under a unified system, Carlisle could be the red-headed stepchild syndrome."

At the Weis Markets store, David Bowermaster of Carlisle said the law school has "a good presence" in the borough and should stay so that students are close to the state Capitol.

"State College is in the middle of the mountains, said Ken Evans of Carlisle, another shopper. "Don't split up the law school."

"There are more opportunities for internships here with the courthouse and with Harrisburg," said Linda Moll of Carlisle. "Splitting the law school won't save money. I can't imagine anyone who wants to be an attorney going to State College."

Bob Horner of Hampden Twp. was photographing CowParade cows with his family.

"There's something to be said about smaller campuses," he noted. "The law school fits into this town and is close to Harrisburg, where the students can get law experiences."

It makes sense to have "one law school in one place, Carlisle," said Amy Johnson of Enola.

Ken Punt of Carlisle expressed concern that Penn State officials "down the road" would close the law school here.

Sister Mary Cronin of Annville and Sister Jo Ann Siesko of Steelton, who were in the borough looking at the cow sculptures, discussed the plan.

"Maybe this could be the main law school campus and State College would be a satellite campus," Cronin said. Siesko discussed advantages of keeping the law school, "close to Harrisburg and the state Supreme Court."

Jennifer Sultzaberger of New Cumberland, who just completed her second year at The Dickinson School of Law, called the school "a great asset" to Carlisle.

Michaels, the third-year student, said if law students take their first year in State College, then have the choice between staying there or coming to Carlisle, many might stay in State College.

"But Carlisle is the county seat, is near Harrisburg and closer to Washington," he said. "It has more professional opportunities. State College isn't even a county seat."

He also said the law school fits into Carlisle. "People here are bending over backward to keep the law school here. We're wanted and welcome. State College hasn't made any overtures to get us there."
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  #91  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2004, 9:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wrightchr
i noticed the new laboratory going on at 2nd and chestnut streets a while back, but i think it's only gonna be 2 levels high. i could be wrong though. i think this is just another step in consolidating services at HBG Hosptial, so PinnacleHealth can vacate Poly Clinic eventually. it's been a long term goal for the hospital to strip Poly Clinic and move services and hospital beds to other facilities. i know the mayor has been trying to come up with new ideas for redevelopment of the poly clinic campus, including part of the new university. also, hacc has just added on-site services at poly clinic, so maybe it will continue to be around in the near distant future. IMO i think this area needs more hospitals, not less of them.
Yeah, you are dead on about Pinnacle and their plans with Poly. I know that Pinnacle has already moved a lot out of the bldg. In fact, they lease a lot of it out now.

I agree re: the hospitals. I say add more or expand (and I mean really expand) on the current ones. For a while there last year, almost every hospital in the area was on divert because they were filled to the max.

Quote:
i'm going to the brewersfest...i already bought tickets for my girlfriend and i. i'm hoping to get some of my friends to go as well. i'm sure some of them will...maybe get something to eat afterwards or do the bar crawl scene DT should be interesting...i might be walking home to Camp Hill...lol. are you going Dave?
LOL I had something going on that (I guess I should say "this" b/c it is almost here) weekend, but I think I am going to go to the Brewersfest instead. I'll keep you posted, and maybe we could use the opportunity to finally meet in person.


Here's some more development news in the area. I was wondering what they were going to do w/ this land since it has been on the market for quite a while...

Townhomes proposed for Carlisle Pike

Monday, June 14, 2004
BY CHRIS A. COUROGEN
Of The Patriot-News

After several years of unsuccessfully trying to market it as a commercial site, developers are hoping to build townhomes at Waterford Square.

Engineer John Murphy of Alpha Consulting Engineers last week told Silver Spring Twp. officials that the 20.5-acre tract along the Carlisle Pike east of Cumberland Drive would hold 120 townhomes.

Homes in the development would be priced in the $150,000 to $200,000 range. The marketing effort would target empty-nesters -- older adults with no children at home, Murphy said. It would not likely have a big impact on the Cumberland Valley School District population, Murphy told the supervisors.

Murphy said the owners, Cornerstone Development, have been unable to sell lots for commercial development.

According to the firm's real-estate broker, Bill Gladstone of CIR, the median strip between the east- and west-bound lanes of the Carlisle Pike in that area makes access difficult.

Although access might be improved when the planned New Kingston bypass is completed, that would mean letting the parcel lie vacant for several more years, Gladstone told the supervisors.

Murphy reminded the supervisors that when the commercial plan was proposed, the school district had indicated it preferred residential development on the plot because of its proximity to the high school.

Because the current development plan was approved under the township's old zoning ordinance, residential use would be permitted, Murphy said.

Cornerstone has not prepared detailed plans for the proposed development. Murphy said he wanted to get a sense of the supervisor's sentiments for or against the project.

"If you kick us out of here today, we won't bring in a plan," he said.

Although the supervisors indicated concern over the lower tax revenues and higher demand for services that residential development would bring, they seemed willing to consider such a change.

When Murphy pressed for an informal nod of approval, Supervisor Chris Latta told him, "This board is open-minded and reasonable."

"Then you're not kicking us out of the room," Murphy said, laughing, in response.
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Old Posted Jun 14, 2004, 9:28 PM
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Hooray!!! This will set us up for even more construction that will seem to never end. :carrot: *Of course I do like the last plan in bold the best, though.

Midstate highway projects readied

$294 million in work to be OK'd in August

Monday, June 14, 2004
BY FRANK COZZOLI
Of The Patriot-News

Pennsylvania's 12-year Transportation Plan won't be completed until August, but the major projects planned for the Harrisburg region are all but approved.

On Friday, the Harrisburg Area Transportation Study's technical committee recommended approval of $294 million in projects for 2005 through 2008.

The plan includes:
  • $5 million to begin preliminary engineering to widen Interstate 83 from the Eisenhower Interchange to Interstate 81.
  • $7 million to study and install more Intelligent Highway System technology, such as message boards and closed-circuit television, around the beltway.
  • $2.5 million to expand the intersection of Paxton and Cameron streets in downtown Harrisburg.
The Transportation Improvement Program was developed over 11 months by HATS' planning staff and the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation.

HATS' Coordinating Committee is to vote on the program June 25, two days after the public comment period ends. The plan is revised every two years.

The updated plan is to be approved Aug. 5 when the state Transportation Commission meets in Johnstown. It is $57 million leaner than the current transportation plan.

The reduced spending can be traced to the lack of a federal transportation bill and any funding it would include, said Terry Adams, planning and programming coordinator for PennDOT's District 8 office.

Some projects are close to construction, including the $85.8 million job to revamp and widen the interchange of routes 15 and 581 on the West Shore.

That work, which includes a diamond interchange for Route 15 at Zimmerman Drive in Lower Allen Twp., is to begin in 2006.

The program also includes maintenance on 38 bridges, Adams said.

The plan to build a full interchange for Route 581 at Trindle and St. John's Church roads in Hampden Twp has been delayed.

Because of funding constraints, preliminary engineering on the project won't begin until 2007, Adams said.

The project would add an on-ramp from Trindle Road to Route 581 west, and an off-ramp from Route 581 east.

Planning was made tougher by the absence of a federal transportation bill, officials said. The latest one, the Transportation Equity Act -- 21st Century, expired last fall.

That forced planners to estimate how much money the region could expect to receive during the next four years. Adams said modest increases are expected.

So far, public involvement has been lacking. Thursday night, no one showed up during an open house at the Cumberland County Planning Commission office.

Kirk Stoner, director of the planning commission, questioned how that could happen in a county where transportation is a hot-button issue.

That meeting, and three others for this week, were advertised in the legal ads of The Patriot-News. Stoner suggested taking additional steps to notify the public to get them to the open houses.

"Let's just not meet a bureaucratic requirement; let's do it right," Stoner said.

Any public comments will be attached to the plan when it is presented to the Coordinating Committee.
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Old Posted Jun 14, 2004, 9:30 PM
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What a wonderful, wonderful project!!!


SCI-TECH

School to add pupils, staff

Monday, June 14, 2004
BY JOHN LUCIEW
Of The Patriot-News

Sci-Tech High, Harrisburg's experimental first-year math and science school, seems to have done the impossible.

It finished classes on Friday at Rowland School and left its 140 students wanting more.

A few are even counting the days until school resumes on Aug. 30.

"Next year is when all the good stuff is going to come," gushed Tyler Hargrove, 15.

That's when the Sci-Tech program doubles in size, to 300 students, and moves into its new building downtown, a refurbished, three-story, glass-enclosed academy filled with modern labs. **See pics of the progress in the Construction Threads section in P&C**

When it does so, the long-troubled Harrisburg schools will have about 15 students from outside the city who will pay tuition to attend Sci-Tech.

In addition, there will be city students who transfer to Sci-Tech from private or parochial schools.

Every student will get a laptop computer as the school strives toward a paperless learning environment.

These and other changes were enough to excite Sci-Tech's inaugural class.

"We'll have better resources next year," said Asia Moore, 15. "We could have done so much better in the new building."

Indeed, Sci-Tech's first year sometimes had the feel of a dress rehearsal, a warm-up for bigger things to come.

It was a year of learning for students, teachers and administrators.

They found out what works -- the daring, experimental curriculum that allows students to literally wrap their hands around science.

And they found out what doesn't -- most students need intensive work on math skills to fully grasp science, especially the school's focus on teaching physics before other sciences.

Nevertheless, officials believe they're onto something. They say the school's hands-on approach, along with inviting scientists to the school and sending students to technology companies, science labs and hospitals, has awakened young minds.

"We're trying to get the students to see science is real," said Sci-Tech Director Lisa Waller. "It's something they can do."

Sci-Tech's new building, the former YWCA in the 200 block of Market Street, should enhance that academic awakening, Waller said.

The site remains under construction, but officials promise that the space will be ready for occupancy in July.

On a recent walk-through for teachers, the building looked anything but ready. The front remained a steel skeleton, with torn plastic blowing in the wind.

Inside, classrooms were taking shape. And two 1,200-square-foot labs were being outfitting with plumbing, gas, ventilation and fire-extinguishing systems.

The building also will house a business incubator that will be part of the planned Harrisburg University. Sci-Tech -- officially known as the Harrisburg University of Science and Technology High School -- is a joint venture between the university and Harrisburg School District.

As teachers strolled the building's dusty corridors amid the drone of power tools, they envisioned the possibilities, even as some groused about more practical concerns.

"Have they settled the parking issue yet?" asked one instructor, concerned about the lack of free parking downtown.

Another fretted over the paucity of storage space and the small size of the faculty rooms. "We don't have the time or the money to scan everything," said the teacher, referring to the school's move to a paperless system.

In fact, Harrisburg University President Melvyn D. Schiavelli didn't want any books in the school library, preferring that students use databases or the Internet.

Eventually, he made concessions to old-fashioned paper, said Sci-Tech Assistant Director Meg Burton. "You've got to have books," she said.

The building also will feature more courses and more teachers, as the faculty doubles, to 22. And, of course, more students.

But getting into the application-only program was tougher this time. There was more competition -- 400 applicants for 150 slots -- and a new eight-point criteria that takes into account everything from attendance, grades and assessment test scores to teacher recommendations.

"It's not just the top students," Burton said. "These are motivated students who want to go to college."

As for the school's first year, officials pronounced it a success. But it wasn't without what Waller delicately referred to as "challenges."

Sci-Tech lost about 15 students, or less than 10 percent of its class. Some moved. Some asked to go back to the high school. A few were sent packing by administrators.

"It wasn't the right fit for them," Burton said. "Either they found that out, or we figured it out."

Administrators were proud that there were just two in-school fights. Even these were just flash-point exchanges of a couple of punches, they said.

One fracas occurred as Mayor Stephen R. Reed was touring the school. The mayor, who has been overseeing the district since December 2000, was ready to call in police until school directors talked him out of it.

And it turned out that all that science and math -- with little art and no gym -- was a curriculum mix that needed to be adjusted. Students missed the other courses.

It's too late to change plans for the new building, but school officials are in talks with Fitness Firm, a health club in Strawberry Square, to permit students to use the facility. And art lovers will attend programs at the nearby Susquehanna Art Museum and Capital Area School for the Arts.

Even the act of getting to school will be different. Instead of yellow school buses, students will get free bus passes and ride Capital Area Transit.

Considering all the work that must be accomplished before classes resume, the summer promises to be short.

Administrators and teachers will have at least a dozen meetings, including one today, to prepare for the switch to the building. And students again will be taking weeks of enrichment classes offered at HACC.

"We have no vacation," said Waller.

As Sci-Tech closed the books on its first year, there was a sense of satisfaction mixed with the inescapable feeling that the best was yet to come.

"We've done all we could for our students this year," said Waller. "But we know we can do better."
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  #94  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2004, 4:04 AM
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great posts again Dave...you are on top of the news

as for area transportation projects and HATS...i can name numerous improvements that will be taking place within the next few years, including:

the 21st street/camp hill bypass intersection project should be underway within the next 6 months-1 year or so. that project is long overdue!

the widening of US 22 from penbrook to colonial park with improvements to progress ave/allentown blvd is also in the engineering phase.

northern and southern gateway projects....and numerous other highway/roadway widenings and rehabilitations and improvement projects.

the US 15/581 widening project has the most beneficial impact to the region though IMO...i will widen US 15 from market street in CH south to the new interchange by the capital city mall to 6 lanes. ramp improvements to 581 will also reduce congestion. this project will allow the interchange to become upgraded to interstate standards...which is not currently met because of the current interchange configuration. this means that PA 581 could be replaced with an interstate designation within the next few years. maybe the beltway will become I-483??? it's anybodys guess right now, but the idea has been floating around for some time and it has potential.

as for the new university...i heard that the old DT post office grounds are being considered for ground zero and development of the major buildings for the institution? i think i read that on a post you made before...or maybe in the paper??? not sure, but that area makes the most sense to me, because it's close to DT, the sci-tech high school, and would be reasonable for commuters/residential students alike. maybe we'll see some highrise residential dorms...similar to the communist block looking ones in state college lol. wouldn't that just add something to the skyline
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  #95  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2004, 6:20 PM
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<b>City wants sound rules eased
Liquor Control Board to hear pros, cons on bars' outdoor music </b>

Tuesday, June 15, 2004
BY JOHN LUCIEW
Of The Patriot-News

Harrisburg residents and business owners will get their say on downtown bar noise.

The Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board has scheduled a public hearing for 10 a.m. tomorrow in City Council chambers on a plan to once again relax noise enforcement on the city's Restaurant Row.

For the second straight year, Harrisburg has applied to the PLCB for the more lax enforcement that would give downtown bars broader latitude when it comes to outdoor music during the summer season.

Last summer, Harrisburg became the first city in the state to take advantage of an amendment to the state's liquor laws giving municipalities -- not the state -- the right to enforce their own rules when it comes to bar noise.

The more relaxed noise rules were in effect for a 60-day trial last year.

The biggest change was that downtown bars, clubs and restaurants could plug in outdoor speakers to provide what establishment owners and patrons called ambience for al fresco dining. Some critics called it noise.

Traditionally, PLCB rules have prohibited outdoor music at licensed establishments. But under the enforcement change, Harrisburg's noise ordinance would be in effect, tolerating sounds of up to 15 decibels above the ambient noise level on the street.

Once again, Harrisburg has applied for a seasonal enforcement change only, rather than requesting it be permanent.

A PLCB spokeswoman said the agency would review the testimony given at the hearing, then the three-member board would issue a decision shortly after that.
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  #96  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2004, 6:22 PM
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another freakin merger

<b>Camp Hill bank makes deal to merge</b>
Tuesday, June 15, 2004
BY TOM DOCHAT
Of The Patriot-News

Pennsylvania State Bank of Camp Hill would become part of Lancaster-based Sterling Financial Corp. under a $44 million merger announced yesterday.

Sterling plans to buy The Pennsylvania State Banking Co. in a stock and cash transaction that is expected to close late this year or early in 2005.

The deal would increase Sterling's geographic reach into the Harrisburg region and enable Pennsylvania State Bank to provide more services in estate and financial planning and wealth management.

Pennsylvania State Bank, which has four branches in Cumberland County and two in Dauphin County, would keep its name and charter as an affiliate of Sterling.

Sterling, with more than $2.3 billion in assets, operates a number of affiliate banks, including Bank of Lancaster County, Bank of Lebanon County and Bank of Hanover and Trust Co. It also offers leasing, insurance and wealth-management services.

"We are extremely pleased Pennsylvania State Bank is joining the Sterling Financial family," said J. Roger Moyer Jr., Sterling president and CEO. "We have felt for some time that the demographics in Cumberland and Dauphin counties are an ideal match for our community banking model, and to enter those areas with a quality, local bank that people know and trust is ideal."

Pennsylvania State Bank was founded in 1989 in Camp Hill and has grown to more than $200 million in assets at six branches and a commercial loan office in Cleona.

Thomas J. Sposito II, Pennsylvania State Bank's president and CEO, said he sees the Sterling acquisition "as an acceleration of our strategic plan" for the region. "Our goal is to be the community bank of choice in the Harrisburg area."

He said the Sterling deal would enable Pennsylvania State Bank to begin offering trust, insurance and wealth-management services, and allow it to handle larger commercial loans.

The acquisition should enable Pennsylvania State Bank to expand in the Harrisburg market, he added.

Sposito and the bank's current board of directors will remain in place after the acquisition is complete. One member of Pennsylvania State Bank's holding company will be added as a director of Sterling. The Pennsylvania State Bank holding company was formed at the end of last year.

The company employs 62 people. Sposito said a small number of jobs probably will be eliminated through the acquisition, but other jobs may be added. He said no branches will be closed, and no "customer contact" employees will be affected by the acquisition.

Under terms of the deal, Sterling will pay Pennsylvania State Bank shareholders $22 in cash for each of their shares, or the shareholders can exchange their stock for 0.83 of a share of Sterling stock. At least 70 percent of the Pennsylvania State Bank stock must be exchanged for Sterling shares, but the stock exchange will be capped at 75 percent of the Pennsylvania State shares.

The $22 cash price values the purchase at a 66 percent premium to Pennsylvania State's closing price of $13.25 a share last Thursday. Pennsylvania State stock, which is traded over the counter, closed yesterday at $20.52, up $7.27, or 55 percent.

Sterling shares, traded on the Nasdaq Stock Market, closed at $23.40, down $2.08, or 8.2 percent.

TOM DOCHAT: 255-8216 or tdochat@patriot-news.com
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Old Posted Jun 15, 2004, 6:36 PM
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well it's about to change...for the better IMO

<b>Paxtang rezones, permitting beer store</b>
Tuesday, June 15, 2004
BY MARY KLAUS
Of The Patriot-News

A divided Paxtang Borough Council has approved a commercial zoning change that would allow a barbecue restaurant and beer distributor in the 3600 block of Derry Street.

Council voted 4-3 to change the zoning of the property formerly owned and occupied by Dauphin Consolidated from commercial/office to commercial/retail.

Elizabeth Grace of Camp Hill, the property owner, and her husband, William, are planning a barbecue restaurant in the front of the building and a beer and beverage distributor in the back, William Grace told council. Grace's family owns Olde Towne Beverage in New Cumberland.

Several Paxtang residents spoke against the change. Ellen Kern of the 3600 block of Derry Street called Olde Towne Beverage "quite nice. But it is in the business section, not across the street from residential properties."

Dawn Deaner of the 3600 block of Brisban Street said that Paxtang "is used to a Wicker East [type of business] where one person can generate $1,000 and help with taxes to the borough. But a beer distributor would not generate that much."

William Grace replied that his New Cumberland business does $1 million in sales annually and has had "a low impact on the community."

Former Councilman William Smith, who has lived in the 3700 block of Derry Street for 66 years and has his law office there, urged council to vote against rezoning.

Doug Reynolds of the 3600 block of Brisban Street suggested a middle ground.

"If the residents are interested in protecting the character and nature of that area, the ordinance does not do that but could," he said. "It could require restrictions to the area. If you want [to have] retail [zoning] and to shape the future, the ordinance should be looked at more closely to insure that it is done."

Paxtang Mayor William Parker told council that he checked with New Cumberland police officials on the Grace business there, and "there have been no crime incidents with the business located there."

Council President James R. Schmidt said some residents want to keep Paxtang unchanged while others want ordinances that allow businesses such as construction companies "and have it continue to look like Paxtang. This has been the dilemma for council. You can't make everyone happy."

He said he voted yes "for the good of the borough."

Also voting for the change were council members John R. Ninosky, F. Joe Spackman and Keldeen Stambaugh. Voting against it were Karen Benjamin, George Murphy and Frank Krautheim.

Benjamin said she voted against rezoning after attending two hearings in which several residents spoke against it and none for it.

"The change means that a commercial district that had allowed offices, financial institutions, funeral homes and similar businesses now can have retail stores and food industries," she said. "The borough had started a community planning process. I wish we gave that a chance to work more."

MARY KLAUS: 255-8113 or mklaus@patriot-news.com
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  #98  
Old Posted Jun 15, 2004, 9:17 PM
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EastSideHBG EastSideHBG is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wrightchr
great posts again Dave...you are on top of the news

as for area transportation projects and HATS...i can name numerous improvements that will be taking place within the next few years, including:

the 21st street/camp hill bypass intersection project should be underway within the next 6 months-1 year or so. that project is long overdue!

the widening of US 22 from penbrook to colonial park with improvements to progress ave/allentown blvd is also in the engineering phase.

northern and southern gateway projects....and numerous other highway/roadway widenings and rehabilitations and improvement projects.

the US 15/581 widening project has the most beneficial impact to the region though IMO...i will widen US 15 from market street in CH south to the new interchange by the capital city mall to 6 lanes. ramp improvements to 581 will also reduce congestion. this project will allow the interchange to become upgraded to interstate standards...which is not currently met because of the current interchange configuration. this means that PA 581 could be replaced with an interstate designation within the next few years. maybe the beltway will become I-483??? it's anybodys guess right now, but the idea has been floating around for some time and it has potential.
Thank you, Chris, I try to be. Not an easy job, though LOL It's funny, I remember the days when I would have 1-2 big news posts per week. Now it's everyday. Again I say GO HBG!!! :carrot:

As for the projects you listed, they are MUCH needed as you said. I-483...hmmm, that has a nice ring to it. We are almost approaching the territory of Baltimore/DC with all of these beltway numbers.

Quote:
as for the new university...i heard that the old DT post office grounds are being considered for ground zero and development of the major buildings for the institution? i think i read that on a post you made before...or maybe in the paper??? not sure, but that area makes the most sense to me, because it's close to DT, the sci-tech high school, and would be reasonable for commuters/residential students alike. maybe we'll see some highrise residential dorms...similar to the communist block looking ones in state college lol. wouldn't that just add something to the skyline
Yeah I read that in the news and then I posted it, so who knows where exactly you heard it from LOL The only thing I can see becoming a problem is A) parking (a biggie) and B) future expansion. When I think of Poly's campus, I already think "school". The DT Post Office, kind of. But I picture something smaller there and/or something that will run out of room in no time. I am 50/50 on the issue to be honest with you and I would be happy with either location with an ever so slight nudge to DT for the obvious reasons (student pop., even more businesses will open in that immediate area, etc.).
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Old Posted Jun 15, 2004, 9:24 PM
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Okay, about the noise article. I have a lot to say on this, but I will keep it brief.

I was the first to yell "NIMBY!!!" everytime someone spoke up about the noise there. "If you don't like noise than don't live DT," I would say. But then I actually stopped and listened one night. Damn I can see these people's points now LOL It is L O U D down there, and the outdoor stuff at independent establishments isn't even really going on as much as it was last year. I would like to see the city have control of enforcing the rules when it comes to this, but I just want them to make sure they do enforce it, as it can (does) tend to get a little out of hand down there.

Good news for Paxtang!!!! It's a small step, but a big one in the grand scheme of things. It just goes to show how PA gov'ts aren't viewing alcohol as puritan-esque as they used to. Beer in grocery stores??? I can see it happening very soon...
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Old Posted Jun 16, 2004, 3:52 AM
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Originally Posted by EastSideHBG
Good news for Paxtang!!!! It's a small step, but a big one in the grand scheme of things. It just goes to show how PA gov'ts aren't viewing alcohol as puritan-esque as they used to. <b>Beer in grocery stores??? I can see it happening very soon... </b>
WOOHOO

by the way, if you are going to the brewersfest this weekend let me know. we can meet up and toss back a few...lol.
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