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  #61  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2018, 8:16 PM
BigDipper 80 BigDipper 80 is offline
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Originally Posted by Centropolis View Post
i noticed that last time i was in cincy/no-ky. i've not really seen it anywhere else that i can recall, other than maybe very infrequently in louisville and maybe st. louis. but rarely.

oh...pretty sure i've seen that in london/uk, funnily enough!
I lived up in the attic of one of those Cincinnati row houses for a semester in college... it's quite a challenge trying to jerry-rig an air conditioner to pull in air from one of those tiny cornice windows!
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  #62  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2018, 12:21 AM
sterlippo1 sterlippo1 is offline
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fantastic! Cincinnati packs a lot into a midsize American city.
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  #63  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2018, 3:47 PM
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The_Cincinnati_Kid The_Cincinnati_Kid is offline
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Great set, I love seeing pics from a fresh set of eyes/new visitor to the city. I'm heading back for a few weeks this summer for a family reunion and will spend the bulk of my time bouncing around the basin.
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  #64  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2018, 8:57 PM
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I think a lot of the Over-The-Rhine buildings were effectively vacant and abandoned before the neighborhood was gentrified. Likely even some of the ones which had stores occupying their first story had upper stories which were unused except for storage.
This. OTR was essentially a drug-den with mostly vacant buildings until the mid-2000's. It's population density was that of a western Kansas town until recently. Cincinnati has many depopulated neighborhoods that are structurally dense yet mostly empty (West End and Camp Washington come to mind immediately). Think of OTR like Disneyland's Main Street USA for crackheads...until the current gentrification-wave.
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  #65  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2018, 9:04 PM
eschaton eschaton is online now
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Originally Posted by ColDayMan View Post
This. OTR was essentially a drug-den with mostly vacant buildings until the mid-2000's. It's population density was that of a western Kansas town until recently. Cincinnati has many depopulated neighborhoods that are structurally dense yet mostly empty (West End and Camp Washington come to mind immediately). Think of OTR like Disneyland's Main Street USA for crackheads...until the current gentrification-wave.
With the rehabbed buildings, are almost all of them used for residential, or are small offices moving in on the upper stories as well? If it has a pretty big office component it would help explain why the densities remain relatively low.
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  #66  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2018, 9:20 PM
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OTR has added 300,000 square feet of office space in the past 5-ish years so it's a general mix. The larger buildings turning office; the smaller ones/weird footprints turning residential. Initially in the early 2000's, it was entirely residential with 1st floor retail.
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  #67  
Old Posted May 23, 2018, 4:25 PM
jmecklenborg jmecklenborg is offline
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Originally Posted by destroycreate View Post
Wtf I can't believe they demolished so much of that. What a crime.
Much of the left side of the photograph was in the flood plain so was always low-class since there was a 1-in-5 chance that the area would flood each spring. A flood wall was built in 1948 but at the same time Ohio changed its municipal taxation law from a property tax-based system to one centered around a municipal earnings tax. This enabled cities to earn revenue from non-residents and motivated the cities to tear down their poorest neighborhoods and replace them with commercial activity. So taxes quite literally motivated Ohio's cities to tear themselves down and depopulate.

My grandmother lived down the hall from the city's head lawyer from the 1950s. In his obituary he cited the legal work necessary to tear down 5,000 properties to be his life's greatest accomplishment.
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  #68  
Old Posted May 27, 2018, 4:47 PM
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Originally Posted by destroycreate View Post
Ok wow...I'm blown away by the architecture there. I'm surprised it was that ornate given it's the midwest; Chicago/Milwaukee/Minneapolis architecture, while pleasant, isn't nearly as fanciful looking.

What exactly is the cliffnotes reason(s) that Cincinnati isn't bigger and better today than it could be?
cincinatti was probably america's first frontier boomtown. i guess all booms have a bust at some point. you can thank 1800s german stonemasons and bricklayers for all of that intricate detail too. also, shhhh. covington is one my off the radar retirement destinations! great thread.
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  #69  
Old Posted May 31, 2018, 10:13 PM
Buckeye Native 001 Buckeye Native 001 is offline
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Originally Posted by pdxtex View Post
cincinatti was probably america's first frontier boomtown. i guess all booms have a bust at some point. you can thank 1800s german stonemasons and bricklayers for all of that intricate detail too. also, shhhh. covington is one my off the radar retirement destinations! great thread.
To add to that, Cincinnati lives and dies by the Ohio River. I'm greatly simplifying this, but essentially, Cincinnati lost out big by failing to capitalize on the switch from riverboats to trains.
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  #70  
Old Posted May 31, 2018, 10:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Buckeye Native 001 View Post
To add to that, Cincinnati lives and dies by the Ohio River. I'm greatly simplifying this, but essentially, Cincinnati lost out big by failing to capitalize on the switch from riverboats to trains.
well, i think cincinnati did try, as did st. louis...both places were organically developing just fine and both had a reasonable number of railroads (and importantly...banks)...and then a suffocating torrent of capital opened to practically *only* chicago partially because the other two self-sufficient big transport and banking hubs of the midwest were too close to the south. i'm sure cincinnati had some big railroads planned (and was a larger, richer banking hub early on) and st. louis had a railroad to the pacific planned very early on...and it's immortalized in the stained glass in union station...it just kept running out of money. chicago, however, was handed a blank check by the east coast.
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Last edited by Centropolis; May 31, 2018 at 10:52 PM.
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