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Old Posted Jan 27, 2017, 10:25 PM
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GUATEMALA CITY 2016 – 2 days in Central America's largest city

Population: 2 110 000 (metro 4 500 000)
Capital of Guatemala
Department: Guatemala City
Language: Spanish
Founded: 1776
Tallest building: Torre Premier Club (102m)
Area: 692 km² (metro 2 126 km²)
Elevation: 1 500 m
Year visited: August 2016
http://worldtravelimages.net/Guatemala_City.htm

Centro Cultural Miguel Ángel Asturias, National Theatre 42 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Guatemala City is the capital of Guatemala and the largest city in the country, and the whole Central America. It is situated in the inland, surrouded by green mountains in the valley Valle de la Ermita, 1.5km above the sea, not far from the border to the El Salvador.

Guatemala City, or Ciudad de Guatemala in Spanish, was founded in 1776. During the Spanish colonial times it was a small city, though it was temporarily the capital of Central America, since Antigua was destroyed in an earthquake in 1775. The current city was built around and above the 9000 year old maya city, Kaminaljuyu. Not much of it is preserved today, but its ceremonial core can be found in a park with the same name. There are today no less then 10 universities in the city. There is an active volcano, Pacaya, only 30km southwest of the city. Its latest eruption was in 1965.

The city is huge, and consist of 21 different zones that are very different in character; Zona 1, that is the city centre, mainly consists of historical heritage buildings from the Spanish colonial times. The Plaza Mayor de la Constritucion is the most important square in the country. It is very large and consists of two parts; Parque del Centenario and Plaza de las Armas; here you find the neo-classic Metropolitan Cathedral (Catedral Metropolitana, built 1815), the National Palace (Palacio Nacional, the government building in baroque/renaissance/fascist in style that formerly also was the presidential residence, built in 1943), a huge Guatemalean flag and the National Library (Biblioteca Nacional). You also find a part of 6A Avenida that is a long pedestrian street, nice with expensive brand stores and malls like the colourful Plaza Vivar. It passes the Parque Concordia and the monumental Ministerio de Gobernación (Ministry of Interior) building. Zona Viva is a very modern business district with highrise buildings in glass and steel, luxury hotels, office buildings and shopping malls. It is the safest district in the city, and has good roads and pavements. To the southeast of Zona Viva is Zona Pradera, that features the city's largest mall, Pradera Concepción and even more modern office buildings and highrises. While there are suburbs for the rich and upper middle class with large private residences, many high in the mountains, and shantytowns, some of them huge, surrounded by good roads, malls and supermarkets, there are large shantytowns were you don't evern find basic supplies and the simple houses seem to fall apart anytime, all around the city.

In Centro Civico (Civic Center), just south of the historical city centre, you find large and tall monumental government buildings, most of them white and grey in modernist style, wide avenues, and large plazas with impressive fountains and sculptures. There are also many beautiful old churches in the central parts of the city. Plaza Municipal and Plaza Espana are mayor squares in the modern part of the central city. Between Zona Viva and the city centre you find Torre del Reformador, a tower that looks a bit like a simplified and much lower Eiffel Tower. The tower is built right above 6A Avenida, Guatemala City's main boulevard. In this area, where you also find fastfood restaurants and car repair shops, but the most interesting sight is probably the beautiful church Iglesia Yurrita, and the mansion next to it, Casa Yurrita. Both these buildings are light red and resembles Gaudi's amazing architecture.

As you know have learned, Guatemala City, is an extremely diverse city. There are definately more rich and middle class people then in El Salvador, but the poor areas are also bigger. Students from the middle class go to modern universities with the latest computres, and their parents drive expensive European cars, while the houses in shantytowns, that are filled with criminal gangs, barely hold together, and it is not obvious there are even tap water. So the contrasts are huge! In general, Guatamela, at least in the captial, is more developed then El Salvador with roads, modern buildings, expensive cars etc.

There are also lots of markets many of them old fashioned and a bit rundown, but charming. Near Plaza Mayor you find the most wellknown one, Mercat Central (the Central Market), a bohemic underground market, underneath a plaza. You will find a lot of modern roads and malls in the city. The largest mall is Pradera Concepion in Zona Pradera, and the newest mall is Oakland Mall in Zona 10. Plaza Fontabella in Zona Viva resembles a small Italian city. Paseo Cayala is the most impressive one, since it is an outdoor shopping center and residential area that is built like a Spanish town, complete with stores, restaurants, cafés, roads, upper floor apartments and a church, all in heritage style! Paseo Cayala is situated a bit away from the city centre, it is very classy, safe and all buildings are white there.

We visited Guatamala City as a two day trip at the end of our two and a half week long trip to El Salvador. We stayed at the comfy 4.5 star highrise hotel Holiday Inn in the safe and modern Zona Viva district. Right opposite the hotel was the brand new Hard Rock Café, that we visited twice. It's large neon guitar sign adds even more international atmosphere to this modern district. There are also other districts with skyscrapers and modern hotels. There are many tall buildings, but the tallest ones are only just over 100m tall.

MY EXPERIENCE, SAFETY AND TRANSPORTATION:

We had the opportunity to visit Guatemala City as a 2.5 day long trip fro El Salvador. It took about 7 hours by the cheap luxury bus Pullmantur to get there from San Salvador, from where we flew back to Europe.We were only two persons that went there, without any guide or locals to guide us, so I had to make a lot of planning before we arrived, in the last minute since the trip to Guatemala wasn't planned from the beginning. With only 2 days to spend, we chosed between visiting the popular historical city Antigua (situated just a few km from GC) and the capital, but as usual we ended up in the big city.

Guatemala is dangerous, only slightly less dangerous then El Salvador. We travelled by the very modern and luxurious, yet cheap, Pullmantur buses that took about 5 hours from San Salvador. The large double decked bus featured black leather seats, air condition, two bus maids, meals, toilet, headphones, TV displays that showed movies, and toned windows. It stopped right in front of our hotel, the Holiday Inn, so we didn't have to worry about walking around in this dangerous city with our bags looking for the hotel, or be fooled by a taxi driver (that likely wouldn't happen but we didn't know that at that point). It is very advisable to stay at this hotel if you go by Pullmantur (that we highly recommend), and to make plans for everything before entering the city. Only use the green buses, and taxis. The green buses,are modern, new and safe, drive on special lanes and stops at gated bus station, guarded by policemen that also help elderly and disabled people. The system is called Transmetro and works as a metro system, but for buses above ground. Just mind that rush hours can be really hard at times! Absolutely avoid the red buses! These are used American school buses, owned by private companies and transformed into local buses, just like in ES, but that is not the problem. The problem is the very high crime rate, the many robbings and killings on these buses that often are used by poor people and drive to shady areas. It is also a bit dangerous since people ride on the outside of the buses. The green and the red buses are like day and night.

But it felt safe enough to go without any guide, we got there by bus and were not walking around at dark, except for in Zona Viva where we stayed, that is the most modern and safe area in the city. During our walk in the old town we took special precaution. We saw some heavy armed policemen outside a Burger King restaurant we visited, and then noticed there are outside most large stores and restaurants, just like in ES.

We also walked around in the area around Torre del Reformador and Plaza Espana. Some locals tried to talk to us at the main square, Plaza Mayor, may be they were just curious but we didn't want to get into trouble so we pretended to not knowing any English or Spanish.

Taxis are small but they drive civilized. The drivers were pollite, the trips were extremely cheap and the cars are really small. There are 3 big companies, white, yellow (drive on taxameter but a bit more expensive) and blue. We didn't get fooled by the price as in many cities in Europe for example.

The international airport, La Aurora, is situated close to Zona Viva in the south part of the city.

Between 1960 and 1996 there was a violent internal armed conflict in Guatemala, that might be the source to much of the chaos in the country. Except for crime there are also threats from the nearby volcano, Pacaya (last eruption 1965), earthquakes, corruption heavy traffic, bad roads and pollution. Several blocks were torn down in a huge sinkhole in 2007, that got much attention in media. With that said, we didn't experience any trouble during our visit.

HEALTH:

We stayed at a first class hotel, and mostly went to modern restaurants and cafés so we couldn't say if they had the same problem with water and toilets as in El Salvador, but we got the impression it was better, at least in the capital. We had no problems with the zika virus during our visit.

CLIMATE:

We visited in August. The air is also a lot better then in ES, since it is 1.5km high up in the sky it is much less humid. It was warm and sunny, but not unbearably warm. The first day, we arrived in the afternoon, it was grey and rained a bit. The rest of the trip it was sunny.

FOOD:

The food in Guatemala is generally very good. The food is quite similar to ES. Pupusas is the local food, and brown beans. They have special restaurants for pupusas, pupuserias. Guatemala has local fastfood brands, as Pollo Campello, a chicken chain that you also find a lot in El Salvador, as well as most of the international ones represented, as Burger King, Mc Donald's, Pizza Hut, Subway and Starbucks.'

CURRENCY:

The currency is qetzal. Keep in mind to change back to your local currency before you leave the country, because most countries refuse to switch qetzal, since it is such a weak currency, something we unfortunately had to experience! Most hotels, stores, restaurants and taxi drivers accept US dollars, as it is about to replace the quetzal, just like in ES. So it might be wise to just use US$ in Guatemala City!

Since it is a developing country, eveyrthing is very cheap in Guatemala.
The trip to Guatemala City was very exciting, interesting and highly recommended!
http://worldtravelimages.net/Guatemala_City.htm

Let’s start with Zona Viva, a safe and modern business district in this south part, as this was our first impressions of GC, and where our hotel was:
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Old Posted Jan 27, 2017, 10:29 PM
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ZONA VIVA:

Zona Viva, that is the main business, shopping and entertainment district in Guatemala City. It is situated in Zona 10 in the south part of the city and is very modern. It is bordered by Avenida La Reforma to the West and Diagonal 6 to the East. Here you find modern highrises, fancy stores, malls, luxury hotels, fastfood restaurants, bars, night clubs and good restaurants. The roads are in good condition, and it is one of the safest areas of Guatemala City, it is a great contrast to both the historical center and the nearby poor areas. La Aurora Airport, the international airport, is situated just a few blocks from Zona Viva (that could be seen from our hotel room). Many of the highrise hotels and office buildlings are illuminated, many with neon lights after dark. Condominio Geminis, Edificio Atlantis (glass buildings with an atrium that features a shopping galleria and an atrium), Dubai Center, Euro Plaza, Pacific Plaza, and Interamericas World Financial Center are some examples of office and apartment highrise complexes, many of them are twin towers. Due to the proximity to the airport, none of these highrises are taller then 20 floors. The last decades many of the highrises have arisen like swamps from the ground, yet it is still a green and comfortable area, much less hectic then the central parts. You find exclusive boutiques, wellknown brand stores, and restaurant and fastfood chains like Hard Rock Café, Mc Donald's, Burger King and Starbucks as well as Pizza Grizzly with it's significant bear sculpture at the entrance.
Westin Camino Real and Real Intercontinental are the most prominent highrise luxury hotels in Zona Viva. Radisson, Clarion, Mercure, Hilton Garden Inn, Holiday Inn (were we stayed, read review at the bottom of the text) are other large hotels.
There are several nice, large and modern shopping malls in Zona Viva . Plaza Fontabella is a special fashionable mall, partly outdoors, with colourful buildings in Italian style built around courtyards. It is quite new and was built in neo-colonial style. Among its features is a vintage Citroën 2CV, and a London phone box, placed by Saul's Café. Oakland Mall (click here) is the newest and most upscale shopping mall, it has 170 stores on 6 floors and is sitauted right at the East boundary of Zona Viva. The mall features a waterfall (that seemed impossible to find), an aquarium, lost of escalators, atriums with glass enclosed elevators, a merry-go-round, a mobile train for children, large panorama windows, A Siman department store (chain from El Salvador), several restaurants and a foodcourt (where we had breakfast). A vintage VW bus can be found at Saul's Café.
Holiday Inn Guatemala, the hotel where we stayed, is also situated in Zona Viva. It was idealic since the luxurious yet cheap Pullmantur bus (highly recommended) from El Salvador stopped right at the hotel. Right opposite the hotel was Dubai Center with the new 2-storey Hard Rock Café, that we visited twice. It is significant for its large neon guitar sign. The hotel is a 4-star white highrise hotel with 18 floors, built in 1997, it's exterior is illuminated in green light after dark. The double room on floor 12 was great with amazing views of Zona Viva, the airport, other parts of the city and the mountains. The marble bathroom was large and light and the air condition worked well. The only downpart for some people might be that it is close to the airport and commercial flights passed very often close to the hotel, personally I think it added to the international feeling. Service was ok, but nothing special. The lobby was typical modern with dark wood panels, the hotel features a souvenir shop, two ATMs, a restaurant and a Barista café.


Zona Viva 46 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Holiday Inn, our hotel
Zona Viva 49 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Westin Camino Real

Zona Viva 50 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Zona Viva 42 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Zona Viva 45 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Zona Viva 53 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr
Zona Viva 68 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Zona Viva 70 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

http://worldtravelimages.net/Guatema..._Zona_Viva.htm
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Old Posted Jan 27, 2017, 10:36 PM
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MORE ZONA VIVA:

Zona Viva 75 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Zona Viva 78 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Zona Viva 79 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Zona Viva 91 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Zona Viva 92 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Zona Viva 93 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Zona Viva 94 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Zona Viva 97 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Zona Viva 03 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Zona Viva 10 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Zona Viva 14 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Zona Viva 22 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Zona Viva 23 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Zona Viva 13 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Zona Viva 26 by worldtravelimages.net, on Flickr

Zona Viva 29 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Zona Viva 37 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Zona Viva 38 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Zona Viva 39 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Zona Viva 40 by Nightsky, on Flickr

http://worldtravelimages.net/Guatema..._Zona_Viva.htm
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Old Posted Jan 28, 2017, 12:17 AM
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Nice ones mate!

It's a part of the world that really fascinates me, but also a part where I feel one has to compromise a tad too much due to safety concerns..

Did the crime risk feel limiting on your travels? ( no secret us Scandinavians stand out most places )
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Old Posted Jan 30, 2017, 1:22 AM
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Thanks a lot for comments!

Quote:
Originally Posted by FREKI View Post
Nice ones mate!

It's a part of the world that really fascinates me, but also a part where I feel one has to compromise a tad too much due to safety concerns..

Did the crime risk feel limiting on your travels? ( no secret us Scandinavians stand out most places )
I think the safety has improved in Guatemala and El Salvador the latest 10 years. We didn't see any violence during the two days we visited GC, but armed guards were everywhere. Anyway, it didn't feel that dangerous walking in the historical downtown (that I'll show later), during the day, but we had to be careful. Zona Viva, the modern business district where our hotel was, and the shopping malls, felt safe, even after dark. It's a shame that so many people visit the capital just to take the bus to Antigua or other places. We only had two days to spend as a trip from El Salvador, so we chosed to concentrate at the capital, as I like big cities, and it is more rare to visit.
GC is really a fascinating city with a lot to see, beautiful churches, monuments, parks and even some nice maya museums that I will show you later. We used taxis (very cheap and safe) and the new, modern and safe Transmetro bus (only 10 cents a ride) to get around.
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Old Posted Jan 30, 2017, 11:18 PM
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HARD ROCK CAFÉ opposite our hotel in Zona Viva:
Hard Rock Café, Zona Viva 03 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Hard Rock Café, Zona Viva 09 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Hard Rock Café, Zona Viva 15 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Hard Rock Café, Zona Viva 01 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Hard Rock Café opposite our hotel in Zona Viva.

HOLIDAY INN GUATEMALA, our hotel, a 4-star highrise hotel:

Holiday Inn Zona Viva 39 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Holiday Inn Zona Viva 80 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Holiday Inn Zona Viva 35 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Holiday Inn Zona Viva 01 by Nightsky, on Flickr
The luxorious yet affordable Pullmantur bus we arrived with from San Salvador, that stopped right at the hotel.
Holiday Inn Zona Viva 02 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Holiday Inn Zona Viva 04 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Holiday Inn, our hotel.


VIEWS FROM OUR ROOM:
Views from Holiday Inn, Zona Viva 18 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Views from Holiday Inn, Zona Viva 19 by Nightsky, on Flickr
La Aurora International Airport

Views from Holiday Inn, Zona Viva 24 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Views from Holiday Inn, Zona Viva 26 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Views from Holiday Inn, Zona Viva 27 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Views from Holiday Inn, Zona Viva 28 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Views from Holiday Inn, Zona Viva 29 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Views from Holiday Inn, Zona Viva 30 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Views from Holiday Inn, Zona Viva 32 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Traffic jam.
Views from Holiday Inn, Zona Viva 15 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Views from Holiday Inn, Zona Viva 16 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Views from Holiday Inn, Zona Viva 17 by Nightsky, on Flickr

http://worldtravelimages.net/Guatema..._Zona_Viva.htm

http://worldtravelimages.net/Guatemala_City_skyline.htm
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Old Posted Feb 10, 2017, 4:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FREKI View Post
Nice ones mate!

It's a part of the world that really fascinates me, but also a part where I feel one has to compromise a tad too much due to safety concerns..

Did the crime risk feel limiting on your travels? ( no secret us Scandinavians stand out most places )
This is not Salvador where he's been too, though. Some of these tiny Central American countries are actually fairly safe, even when you're a supposedly nice looking blond Danish man.

I think Costa Rica's safe for instance. Maybe more than French Guiana where there's quite a bit of crime, unfortunately, and it's definitely a nice place to visit.

Also, Colombia's getting safer and safer today, and they all say Cartagena's a historic gem, with lots of Miami style development too. But this might be growing overly touristy like some French, Italian or Spanish places.

If you can afford a trip, go ahead, take your chance anyway! Just get informed about accurate safety data. Information by your foreign affairs ministry might be something to begin with.
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Old Posted Feb 11, 2017, 1:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mousquet View Post
This is not Salvador where he's been too, though. Some of these tiny Central American countries are actually fairly safe, even when you're a supposedly nice looking blond Danish man.

I think Costa Rica's safe for instance. Maybe more than French Guiana where there's quite a bit of crime, unfortunately, and it's definitely a nice place to visit.

Also, Colombia's getting safer and safer today, and they all say Cartagena's a historic gem, with lots of Miami style development too. But this might be growing overly touristy like some French, Italian or Spanish places.

If you can afford a trip, go ahead, take your chance anyway! Just get informed about accurate safety data. Information by your foreign affairs ministry might be something to begin with.
It depends on where you go. Crime rate is really high in Guatemala City and everywhere you see armed guards. We didn't want to walk around in the old town after dark, but the modern Zona Viva, where our hotel was, felt very safe. Even though it is only blocks away from shantytowns.
Parts of San Salvador is dangerous, but not the whole city. People even have their doors open in the evening to cool their houses in the safer areas! Small towns on the countryside in El Salvador felt very safe, even after dark! It is probably more likely that you will get robbed in the "safe" European or American city where you live, at least if you live in Sweden.
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Old Posted Feb 13, 2017, 12:30 AM
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EDIFICIO DE CORREOS:

Edificio de Correos 04 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Edificio de Correos 05 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Edificio de Correos 06 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Edificio de Correos 03 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Edificio de Correso, former post office, now cultural school.

http://worldtravelimages.net/Guatemala_City_Oldtown.htm
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Old Posted Feb 13, 2017, 8:58 PM
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6A Avenida, Old Town 80 by Nightsky, on Flickr

6A Avenida, Old Town 83 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Bingo is popular in Guatemala and El Salvador.

6A Avenida, Old Town 84 by Nightsky, on Flickr

6A Avenida, Old Town 01 by Nightsky, on Flickr

6A Avenida, Old Town 03 - Pasaje Rubio by Nightsky, on Flickr
6A Avenida, Old Town 04 - Pasaje Rubio by Nightsky, on Flickr
Pasaje Rubio, a small but beautiful shopping arcade where we stopped at a an ecological café.

6A Avenida, Old Town 06 - Pasaje Rubio by Nightsky, on Flickr
The café, popular among hipsters.

6A Avenida, Old Town 07 - Pasaje Rubio by Nightsky, on Flickr

6A Avenida, Old Town 11 by Nightsky, on Flickr

6A Avenida, Old Town 13 by Nightsky, on Flickr

6A Avenida, Old Town 14 - Plaza Vivar by Nightsky, on Flickr


PLAZA VIVAR shopping mall:

6A Avenida, Old Town 16 - Plaza Vivar by Nightsky, on Flickr

6A Avenida, Old Town 18 - Plaza Vivar by Nightsky, on Flickr

6A Avenida, Old Town 19 - Plaza Vivar by Nightsky, on Flickr

http://worldtravelimages.net/Guatemala_City_Oldtown.htm
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Old Posted Jan 28, 2017, 11:04 PM
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Old Posted Jan 29, 2017, 1:14 AM
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Nice pictures
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Old Posted Jan 29, 2017, 7:27 AM
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why is there a telus in guatamala?
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Old Posted Jan 29, 2017, 7:58 AM
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Nice pics!

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why is there a telus in guatamala?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telus_International
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Old Posted Jan 29, 2017, 6:54 PM
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Nice pictures.
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Old Posted Jan 30, 2017, 1:20 AM
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Old Posted Jan 31, 2017, 6:51 PM
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PLAZA MAYOR DE LA CONSTITUCION:

Plaza Mayor de la Constitucion is the most important square of Guatemala City, the political heart of Guatemala and the heart of the Old Town. It is very large and consists of two parts; Parque del Centenario, that is more like a park and the main square, Plaza de las Armas; here you find several beautiful historical buildings;

Catedral Metropolitana (Metropolitan Cathedral), was built 1782-1871 neo-classic/baroque style. The cathedral, also called Santa Iglesia, has two towers and a white baroque interior, long but quite narrow with beautiful chandeliers. It has withstood numerous earthquakes. The 12 pillars in front of the cathedral were built to commemorate the people who died during the internal armed conflict that lasted 1960 and 1996. At first we didn't manage to get in to the stone cathedral, but it turned out it was siesta. We managed to enter the cathedral after the siesta was over.
Palacio Nacional (the National Palace) is the government building, built in 1943 in baroque/renaissance in style with fascist elements. It is also called Palacio Verde and was formerly also was the presidential residence. The building is the origin of all roads in Guatemala, and has a spot known as Kilometro Cero (Zero Kilometer). It is also museum and is used for important acts of the government. There were several plans for the palace that were abandoned but in 1932, President General Jorge Ubico published the basis for the design that was built, by architect Rafael Pérez de León. Unfortunately it was closed to public the day we visited so we couldn't see the beautiful interior. The guards told us it would be open again the next day, but that was the day when we had to depart.
A huge Guatemalean flag, Portal El Comercio, a historical outdoor shopping arcade and the National Library (Biblioteca Nacional, a grey modernist building built in 1957 with maya inspired interior) can also be found at Plaza de la Constitución as the square often is called. There are also some grey 60s modernist highrises around the square.
A part of the main thouroughfare 6A Avenida, that is a long pedestrian street with important historical sites and brand stores, begins at Plaza Mayor.
Mercado Central is the Central Market, just on the backside of the cathedral, one block from Plaza Mayor. It is mostly situated underground, it is somewhat neglect but charming, nice and colourful. Around the market there are many colouful buildings with small stores.

Plaza Mayor de la Constitución 19 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Plaza Constitucion with Catedral Metropolitana.
Plaza Mayor de la Constitución 20 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Palacio Nacional de la Cultura, National Palace 01 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Palacio Nacional de la Cultura, National Palace 02 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Palacio Nacional.
Plaza Mayor de la Constitución 06 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Plaza Mayor de la Constitución 11 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Plaza Mayor de la Constitución 13 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Plaza Mayor de la Constitución 14 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Plaza Mayor de la Constitución 16 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Plaza Mayor de la Constitución 23 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Plaza Mayor de la Constitución 25 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Plaza Mayor de la Constitución 26 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Plaza Mayor de la Constitución 27 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Catedral Metropolitana, the most famous church in Guatemala City.

http://worldtravelimages.net/Guatema...laza_Mayor.htm
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  #19  
Old Posted Jan 31, 2017, 6:52 PM
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Nightsky Nightsky is offline
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MORE FROM PLAZA MAYOR DE CONCEPCIÓN, HISTORIC DOWNTOWN:

Plaza Mayor de la Constitución 28 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Plaza Mayor de la Constitución 29 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Palacio Nacional, national palace.
AROUND THE SQUARE:
Plaza Mayor de la Constitución 30 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Plaza Mayor de la Constitución 38 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Plaza Mayor de la Constitución 36 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Plaza Mayor de la Constitución 40 by Nightsky, on Flickr
This street looks quite rural to be in the heart of Central America’s biggest city, doesn’t it?

Plaza Mayor de la Constitución 41 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Plaza Mayor de la Constitución 46 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Plaza Mayor de la Constitución 48 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Plaza Mayor de la Constitución 56 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Plaza Mayor de la Constitución 61 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Plaza Mayor de la Constitución 01 by Nightsky, on Flickr
National Library.
Plaza Mayor de la Constitución 02 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Maya details at the library building.

Plaza Mayor de la Constitución 03 by Nightsky, on Flickrs
Back to the Metropolitan Cathedral.

INSIDE THE METROPOLITAN CATHEDRAL:
Catedral Metropolitana, cathedral at Plaza Mayor 15 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Catedral Metropolitana, cathedral at Plaza Mayor 02 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Catedral Metropolitana, cathedral at Plaza Mayor 08 by Nightsky, on Flickr

Catedral Metropolitana, cathedral at Plaza Mayor 5 by Nightsky, on Flickr
Dome of the cathedral.

http://worldtravelimages.net/Guatema...laza_Mayor.htm
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  #20  
Old Posted Feb 3, 2017, 3:05 PM
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Nightsky Nightsky is offline
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HISTORIC DOWNTOWN:
- 6A Avenida, 12 Calle, Edificio de Correos, Plaza Vivar, Parque Concordia, Ministerio de Gobernación

The Historic Downtown of Guatemala City is situated around Plaza Mayor de la Constritución and to the south of the square, around the pedestrian part of 6A Avenida, the city's main road. Notable buildings along 6A Avenida is the colourful 6-storey 70s looking shopping mall Plaza Vivar, the yellow shopping arcade Pasaje Rubio in old style with nice cafés, the beautiful red Hotel Royal Palace, Church of Santa Clara (Rectoria de Santa Clara, a large blue/white baroque church with an impressive baroque interior), Church of San Francisco (Iglesia de San Francisco, a small beige baroque church with a simple white interior), Centro Cultural de España (Teatro Cine Lux) and Ministerio de Gobernación (Ministry of Interior, also Policía Nacional Civil de Guatemala ), a large palace like beige 5-storey building with renaissance elements. There are also many fastfood restaurants, restaurants, cafés and brand stores along this road. One block to the east of 6A Avenida, you find one of Guatemala City's most beautiful landmarks: Edificio de Correos, the main Post Office building, two brown historic buildings connected by an arch above the road, opened in 1949, that is in good shape with beautiful Gaudi like decorations. The street that leads there, 12 Calle, is a bit shady with obscure types, so beware! Unfortunately the post office was closed just a few days prior to our visit, so we couldn't visit the interior. The reason was that the post was privatized, and the Canadian company that owns it didn't get their contract delayed! Thre is an art school in the building as well. Parque Concordia, a small elevated park, is situated one level above 6A Avenida. Here you find people relaxing and the statue of Guatemala's famous writer, poet, journalist and diplomat Enrique Gómez Carrillo. 7A Avenida is the parallel road to 6A, that has less sights.

During our visit there was a large student's parade with young students playing in colourful uniforms playing various instruments in a walking orchestra along the pedestrian street. They were also dancing and juggling. The sound was alarming from the orchestra's instruments (drums, horns etc), but was very colourful and a unique culturally interesting experience.

6A Avenida, Old Town 38 by Nightsky, on Flickr


Parade at 6A Avenida:
6A Avenida, Old Town 39 - parade by Nightsky, on Flickr

6A Avenida, Old Town 40 - parade by Nightsky, on Flickr
6A Avenida, Old Town 41 - parade by Nightsky, on Flickr
6A Avenida, Old Town 42 - parade by Nightsky, on Flickr
6A Avenida, Old Town 44 - parade by Nightsky, on Flickr

6A Avenida, Old Town 46 - parade by Nightsky, on Flickr

http://worldtravelimages.net/Guatemala_City_Oldtown.htm
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