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  #2801  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2017, 6:19 PM
ue ue is offline
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The "buddy" thing also happens in Alberta, especially among blue collar and middle class white people. Maybe it's due to Atlantic Canadian diaspora in Alberta, particularly in those socioeconomic groups?
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  #2802  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2017, 6:53 PM
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Is there even a French word for "truck"? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
...camion...
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  #2803  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2017, 8:03 PM
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...camion...
We have a word for everything, don't we?
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  #2804  
Old Posted Mar 4, 2017, 4:44 AM
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Originally Posted by FFX-ME View Post
...camion...
Here both anglophones and francophones will use "transport." But "camion" can mean a pickup truck or a long truck.
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  #2805  
Old Posted Mar 4, 2017, 12:59 PM
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Originally Posted by ue View Post
The "buddy" thing also happens in Alberta, especially among blue collar and middle class white people. Maybe it's due to Atlantic Canadian diaspora in Alberta, particularly in those socioeconomic groups?
You will also hear "buddy" down here in this area as well. I really don't think it's just a Maritimes thing.
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  #2806  
Old Posted Mar 4, 2017, 7:25 PM
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The list is a mix of regional and local idioms, idioms that are common elsewhere in Canada, and items that would probably be better classified as poor grammar.

I like "stunned". The softer form is to call somebody stunned, but you might call them a stunned b**** or a stunned c***.

A couple more:

bird -> penis. It still takes me a minute when I hear somebody say "I flipped him the bird" to remember what they are actually referring to.
goler -> incestuous hick. Not a nice term.

I find English in Atlantic Canada to be a bit more idiomatic and evocative. I miss that a bit here.
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  #2807  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2017, 8:30 PM
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Yeah people say buddy in Vancouver all the time too. Using it as a placeholder for a name (I was driving and buddy cut me off) is pretty rare, but it's very common when used similarly to dude or bro.

I've heard a few people say "holy mackerel" but they all tend to be older people.

I can't wrap my head around the inhaled affirmative at all. I've been sitting here inhaling quickly for a few minutes now and I just don't understand

Also, you can say bird to mean penis here too. That one came straight from Trailer Park Boys.
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  #2808  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2017, 9:56 PM
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I notice that when Newfoundlanders say the full name of their province, they tend to omit the "and". At least, they say it so quickly that I can't decipher it.

For instance, Newfoundland and Labrador becomes "NewfoundlandLabrador", as if it's all one word or hyphenated. Maybe I'm just crazy.

People definitely say "buddy" all the time here to refer to somebody not present, usually as part of a story. "So then buddy _____ and it was so hilarious!" It's almost exclusively working class guys you'll hear saying this. I also think this is more common with younger groups rather than older.
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  #2809  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2017, 2:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by someone123 View Post

I find English in Atlantic Canada to be a bit more idiomatic and evocative. I miss that a bit here.
I think you just put your finger on something.
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  #2810  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2017, 5:49 PM
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This thread came to my mind when I was watching the Junos... I had heard of Ruth B but I really didn't know anything about her. I just automatically assumed she was from Toronto until she opened her mouth to speak, at which point I knew right away she was from somewhere in Western Canada. Turns out she's from Edmonton.

I can't put my finger on the distinctive features of her accent, but something about it jumped out.
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  #2811  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2017, 8:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BretttheRiderFan View Post
I notice that when Newfoundlanders say the full name of their province, they tend to omit the "and". At least, they say it so quickly that I can't decipher it.

For instance, Newfoundland and Labrador becomes "NewfoundlandLabrador", as if it's all one word or hyphenated. Maybe I'm just crazy.

People definitely say "buddy" all the time here to refer to somebody not present, usually as part of a story. "So then buddy _____ and it was so hilarious!" It's almost exclusively working class guys you'll hear saying this. I also think this is more common with younger groups rather than older.
We say the and, definitely. It's just really short.

Newfinlandin' Labrador.
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  #2812  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2017, 1:18 AM
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Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
We say the and, definitely. It's just really short.

Newfinlandin' Labrador.
Newfinlannalabbadar is how Danny Williams says it.
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  #2813  
Old Posted May 14, 2017, 1:37 PM
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So, this week I heard someone being interviewed on CBC Radio say "normalcy" as though it had four syllables (nore-MAL-a-see) rather than three (NORE-mal-see). It reminded me a bit of the way many people pronounce "erudite" with four syllables (AIR-ee-uh-dite) rather than three (AIR-uh-dite or AIR-yuh-dite).

I don't think that either of those four syllable pronuciations would be exclusively Canadian, but I wonder if there are many other words where people routinely add non-esistent syllables?
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  #2814  
Old Posted May 16, 2017, 3:24 PM
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Has anyone listened to the accents on the real house wives of Toronto? they sound.. Stereotypically Canadian. I never remember the accent being like that in Toronto, I used to watch much music in the early 2000's and the VJ's all sounded like they could be from California.
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  #2815  
Old Posted May 16, 2017, 3:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kwoldtimer View Post
So, this week I heard someone being interviewed on CBC Radio say "normalcy" as though it had four syllables (nore-MAL-a-see) rather than three (NORE-mal-see). It reminded me a bit of the way many people pronounce "erudite" with four syllables (AIR-ee-uh-dite) rather than three (AIR-uh-dite or AIR-yuh-dite).

I don't think that either of those four syllable pronuciations would be exclusively Canadian, but I wonder if there are many other words where people routinely add non-esistent syllables?
You mean like new-kyull-lurr?
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  #2816  
Old Posted May 16, 2017, 7:31 PM
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You mean like new-kyull-lurr?
Not exactly (the mangled pronunciation has the same number of syllables).
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  #2817  
Old Posted May 18, 2017, 2:51 AM
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Ar-tic for arctic also bugs me.
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  #2818  
Old Posted May 18, 2017, 3:31 AM
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Ar-tic for arctic also bugs me.
Feb-you-airy is forbidding in the ar-tic. All you can do is sit in the house staring at the pitchers on the walls.
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  #2819  
Old Posted May 18, 2017, 12:30 PM
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Feb-you-airy is forbidding in the ar-tic. All you can do is sit in the house staring at the pitchers on the walls.
Or go read a book in the libary.
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  #2820  
Old Posted May 18, 2017, 12:45 PM
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Or go read a book in the libary.
That would be fustrating.
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