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  #41  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2017, 9:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Franco401 View Post
Saint John is fairly unique among Canadian cities its size in that it doesn't have a "downtown". The Central Business District is referred to as Uptown Saint John due to its position at the top of a hill. There's never been a "downtown",...
Uptown, in this case, really means the same thing, just a different term for it.

The concept and useage of "up" and "down" in geography is interesting. It usually relates well to North and South conventions, also to rivers and travel on the ocean. Many Canadian cities happen to have water and the ports to the south, (New York is somewhat similar with Lower Manhatten being downtown), further reinforcing the concept of "downtown", as being south and next to the ocean, often on lower land, and the oldest part of the city which also became the downtown commercial area. These conventions aren't always the case however; In Nfld., you go "up" to St. John's from other areas of the province (even though it is south), but when you get there, you are also "downtown". You also go "up" to Toronto from Nfld. and the Maritimes, but when you get there you may also be "downtown". Vancouver's downtown qualifies as being next to the port and near the ocean, and on lower land, but is North and West, although its seperation from the rest of the city further identifies its status.

Last edited by Architype; Apr 20, 2017 at 9:52 PM.
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  #42  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2017, 10:22 PM
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I really feel like the red section should cross the DVP to Carlaw and extend to Danforth. Hell it's going to have 2 DRL stops located in it. Also Cabbagetown is a no brainer as part of downtown.
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  #43  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2017, 11:00 PM
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The city of toronto's definition of the downtown area has always been the best in my books. I do prefer the older boundaries than the updated version.

I believe the older boundaries were The Don, Davenport, the lake and, Bathurst above Queen extending to Dufferin below Queen. The revised version is just Bathurst from the Lake to Davenport.
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  #44  
Old Posted Apr 21, 2017, 1:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Architype View Post
The concept and useage of "up" and "down" in geography is interesting. It usually relates well to North and South conventions, also to rivers and travel on the ocean. Many Canadian cities happen to have water and the ports to the south, (New York is somewhat similar with Lower Manhatten being downtown), further reinforcing the concept of "downtown", as being south and next to the ocean, often on lower land, and the oldest part of the city which also became the downtown commercial area.
Yes, and "downtown" does work as a directional in Toronto. North is also uphill and there's a bit of a psychological element to going "up the hill" above Dupont, just as there is crossing the Don River.
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  #45  
Old Posted Apr 21, 2017, 1:20 AM
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The "advantage" to using Bathurst for the boundary of the west, Don River as the boundary for the east and north of St. Clair (or specifically the Belt Line Trail) is its simplicity. The east gets a geographic marker, North Toronto doesn't "interfere with" the west end. Only question is where do the Annex, Rosedale and Yonge-St. Clair fit? Downtown maybe fits within the central area.
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  #46  
Old Posted Apr 21, 2017, 1:49 AM
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Originally Posted by MonkeyRonin View Post
I see it just working something like this - with the red area corresponding to the Downtown core and the green being a sort of "Greater Downtown" (give or take the boundaries a bit):

I pretty much agree with this and like the idea of distinguishing between downtown and surrounding central neighbourhoods. I suppose a rule of thumb IMO is if I feel like I'm in a neighbouhood then I'm probably not downtown. Cabbagetown, Kensington, Riverside, Annex, Niagara, etc... these are all distinct areas where the neighbourhood feel dominates.
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  #47  
Old Posted Apr 22, 2017, 4:05 AM
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I just calculated the population for what called the downtown core, covering Bathurst/University to Jarvis, Davenport to the lake.*

In the 2016 census, there were 121,669 people in this area of 6.6 square km or 2.5 square miles.

I haven't bothered to do the "official" Bathurst to Don defintion, which covers 17 square km or 6.5 square miles, which is fine as a greater downtown but a little large to be the downtown core or "downtown" for comparative purposes IMO.

* Census tracts 11-15, 34-35, 62-63, 88, 89
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  #48  
Old Posted Today, 12:30 AM
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So the Spadina to Roncy hipster belt is part of greater downtown?

It used to be that hipster/bohemian neighborhoods used to be on the edge of downtown (i.e. Gerrard St. in the 50s, Yorkville and the Annex in the 60s and 70s) but now they basically "own" the west end.

Last edited by Docere; Today at 12:41 AM.
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  #49  
Old Posted Today, 7:43 AM
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The western edge for downtown in Toronto is Spadina. For all the major east west streets try become more transitional west of Spadina.

In the east it is Sherbourne as nobody considers River street downtown. Parliament is a good comparable to Bathurst IMO for the east end. The transition points are important as less intensive uses and structures find a good place in these areas

City planners created the Bathurst to the Don River thing. On the ground it isn't what is there now. Locals from the old Boroughs also tend to get lazy and will call anything from High Park to the Don "downtown".

Toronto has a massive downtown as it is. Some parts I only ever see once or twice a year. I don't remember the last time I was at Avenue and Bloor for example.
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